Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 15:29

But he answered and said to his father, ‘Look! For so many years I have been serving you and I have never neglected a command of yours; and yet you have never given me a young goat, so that I might celebrate with my friends;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Inheritance;   Jealousy;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Joy;   Penitent;   Prodigal Son;   Readings, Select;   Salvation;   Self-Righteousness;   Young Men;   Thompson Chain Reference - Prodigal Son;   Son;   The Topic Concordance - Losing and Things Lost;   Salvation;   Seeking;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Murmuring;   Parables;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Goat;   Parable;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Farming;   Food;   Grace;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Ethics;   Gospel;   Pharisees;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Parable;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Zipporah;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Friend, Friendship;   Harmony of the Gospels;   Imagery;   Jesus, Life and Ministry of;   Luke, Gospel of;   Parables;   Prodigal Son;   Repentance;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Food;   Love, Lover, Lovely, Beloved;   Parable;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Animals;   Brotherhood (2);   Children of God;   Debt, Debtor (2);   Father, Fatherhood;   Goat ;   Gospel (2);   Justice (2);   Love (2);   Luke, Gospel According to;   Man (2);   Parable;   Religious Experience;   Righteous, Righteousness;   Sanctify, Sanctification;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Kid;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Fare;   Food;   Forgiveness;   Kid;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for November 6;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Never - a kid - It is evident from Luke 15:12, that the father gave him his portion when his profligate brother claimed his; for he divided his whole substance between them. And though he had not claimed it, so as to separate from, and live independently of, his father, yet he might have done so whenever he chose; and therefore his complaining was both undutiful and unjust.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

A kid - A young goat. This was of less value than the calf; and he complains that while his father had never given “him” a thing of so little value as “a kid,” he had now given his other son the “fatted calf.”

Make merry with - Entertain them give them a feast. This complaint was unreasonable, for his father had divided his property, and he “might” have had his portion, and his father had uniformly treated him with kindness. But it serves to illustrate the conduct of the scribes and Pharisees, and the folly of their complaint.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-15.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

But he answered and said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, and I never transgressed a commandment of thine; and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends.

The distorted views of the selfish soul are evident in this verse. The older brother had received the double portion of the divided estate (Luke 15:12); and he was in fact the owner of the whole estate (Luke 15:31), therefore it was his duty to have given to the father, not the other way around. If this elder brother had wanted to share a banquet with his friends, it was surely within his power to have done so; but as a matter of obvious fact, he did not wish to share anything with anybody, even resenting the slaughter of the fatted calf for the return of his brother.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-15.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he answering, said to his father,.... Commending himself, and reflecting on his father:

lo, these many years do I serve thee; for though he was called a son, yet differed little from a servant; he was of a servile disposition, and under a spirit of bondage; he served his father, not in the Gospel, but in the law, moral and ceremonial; in the letter of it, and not in the newness of the Spirit; externally, and not internally; from fear, and not from love; with mercenary views, and not freely; with trust in, and dependence on his service, seeking justification and eternal life by it, and not with a view to the glory of God; and this he had done "many years"; from his youth upwards, as the Pharisee in Matthew 19:20 whereas his younger brother had never served him, but his own lusts; and yet as soon as ever he was come home, before he could enter upon service, this entertainment was made for him, and which he therefore resented: moreover, he does not say I have served thee, but "I do"; denoting the continuance and constancy of his service; and intimating that his life had been, and was one continued series of obedience:

neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment; which though true of the elect angels, can never be said of any of the sons of men; and which shows, that he had never been under a work of the Spirit of God, who convinces of sin; and had never seen himself in a true light, in the glass of that law, he pretended to serve God in; that he was a stranger to the plague of his own heart, and was a self-deceiver, and the truth of grace was not in him: he could not be a good man, for so to say, is contrary to the experience of all good men; to their groans, complaints, and confessions; to their prayers, for fresh application of pardoning grace; and to the observation of all wise and good men in all ages; and most fully proves him to be, a Pharisee:

and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends; some by a "kid", or "goat", as Theophylact, understand a persecutor, as Saul was of David, and Ahab of Elijah; and so means that God had not delivered up such an one into his hands; or took him away by death, that he might have some peace and rest, amidst his labours and service; and others understand this of the Jews, desiring Barabbas, a goat, and not Jesus, the Lamb of God; but his meaning seems to be, that he had never received any favour in proportion to the services he had done; and so charges his father with ingratitude.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-15.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment — The words are not to be pressed too far. He is merely contrasting his constancy of love and service with the conduct of his brother; just as Job, resenting the charge of hypocrisy by his friends, speaks as if nothing could be laid to his charge (Job 23:10-12), and David too (Psalm 18:20-24). The father attests the truth of all he says.

never  …  a kid — I say not a calf, but not even a kid.

that I might make merry with my friends — Here lay his misapprehension. It was no entertainment for the gratification of the prodigal: it was a father‘s expression of the joy he felt at his recovery.

thy son  …  thy living — How unworthy a reflection on the common father of both, for the one not only to disown the other, but fling him over upon his father, as if he should say, Take him, and have joy of him!

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Do I serve thee (δουλευω σοιdouleuō soi). Progressive present tense of this old verb from δουλοςdoulos (slave) which the elder son uses to picture his virtual slavery in staying at home and perhaps with longings to follow the younger son (Robertson, Grammar, p. 879).

Transgressed (παρηλτονparēlthon). Second aorist active indicative of παρερχομαιparerchomai to pass by. Not even once (aorist) in contrast with so many years of service (linear present).

A kid (εριπονeriphon). Some MSS. have εριπιονeriphion diminutive, a little kid. So margin of Westcott and Hort. B has it also in Matthew 25:32, the only other N.T. passage where the word occurs.

That I might make merry (ινα ευπραντωhina euphranthō). Final clause, first aorist passive subjunctive of the same verb used in Luke 15:23, Luke 15:25.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-15.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Kid ( ἔριφον )

Some read the diminutive, ἐρίφιον , “a little kid.” In any event a contrast is intended between the kid and the fatted calf.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-15.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he answering said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment: and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends:

Lo, so many years do I serve thee — So he was one of the instances mentioned Luke 15:7. How admirably therefore does this parable confirm that assertion! Yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends - Perhaps God does not usually give much joy to those who never felt the sorrows of repentance.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-15.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

But he answered and said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee1, and I never transgressed a commandment of thine2; and [yet] thou never gavest me a kid3, that I might make merry with my friends4:

  1. Lo, these many years do I serve thee. Literally, I am thy slave.

  2. And I never transgressed a commandment of thine. He speaks with the true Pharisaic spirit (Luke 18:11,12; Romans 3:9). His justification was a proud as the prodigal's confession was humble.

  3. And [yet] thou never gavest me a kid. Much less a calf.

  4. That I might make merry with my friends. He reckons as a slave, so much pay for so much work, and his complaint suggests that he might have been as self-indulgent as his brother had he not been restrained by prudence.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-15.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

29 And he answering said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment: and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends:

Ver. 29. And yet thou never gavest me a kid] Much less a calf. Hypocrites hold God to be in their debt, and through discontent weigh not his favours, as being never without some ailment.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-15.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 15:29

Contracted Views in Religion.

I. In the conduct of the father, there seemed, at first sight, an utter departure from the rules of fairness and justice. Here was a reprobate son received into his favour on the first stirrings of repentance. What was the use of serving him dutifully, if there were no difference in the end between the righteous and the wicked? The elder brother's case seemed a hard one; and that, even without supposing him to feel jealous, or to have unsuitable notions of his own importance and usefulness. Apply this to the case of religion, and it still holds good. At first sight, the reception of the penitent sinner seems to interfere with the reward of the faithful servant of God. The words of the text are the expression of an agitated mind, that fears lest it be cast back upon the wide world, to grope in the dark without a God to guide and encourage it in its course.

II. The condescending answer of the Father in the parable is most instructive. It sanctions the great truth which seemed in jeopardy, that it is not the same thing in the end to obey or to disobey, expressly telling us that the Christian penitent is not placed on the same footing with those who have consistently served God from the first. "Son, thou art ever with me; and all that I have is thine;"—that is, "Why this sudden fear and distrust? Surely thou hast known me too long to suppose that thou canst lose by thy brother's gain. Thou art in my confidence. I do not make any outward display of kindness towards thee, for it is a thing to be taken for granted."

III. The elder brother had always lived at home; he had seen things go on one way, and, as was natural and right, got attached to them in that one way. But then, he could not conceive that they could possibly go on in any other way; when an occurrence took place for which he had hitherto met no precedent he lost himself, as being thrust suddenly out of the contracted circle in which he had hitherto walked. He was disconcerted and angry with his father. And so, in religion, we have need to watch against that narrowness of mind, to which we are tempted by the uniformity and tranquillity of God's providence towards us. Let us guard against discontent in any shape, and as we cannot help hearing what goes on in the world, let us guard, on hearing it, against all intemperate, uncharitable feelings towards those who differ from us, or oppose us.

J. H. Newman, Parochial and Plain Sermons, vol. 111., p. 182.


Reference: Luke 15:29.—Homiletic Magazine, vol. xiv., p. 291.


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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-15.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 15:29. Lo, these many years do I serve thee, &c.— This is the young man's own testimony concerning his dutifulness: in which respect it fully represented the self-righteous Pharisees. It is his testimony also concerning the returns which his father had made to him for his services; nevertheless his behaviour on this occasion, as well as that of his father, seems to fix on him the lie in both particulars. Indeed, this branch of the parable is finely contrived to express the high opinion which the Pharisees (here represented by the elder brother) entertained of their own meri

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-15.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

29.] ἰδ. τοσ. ἔτη δουλ. σοι, the very manner of speech of a Pharisee: as is the continuation— οὐδέπ. ἐντ. σου παρ. Could the Jewish nation be introduced saying this, even in the falsest hypocrisy?

ἐμοὶ οὐδέποτε ἔδωκας answers to the younger son’s δός μοι in Luke 15:12;—it is a separation of the individual son from his father, and, as there pointed out, the very root and ground of sin.

ἔριφον, of less value than a calf.

τ. φίλ. μου—who are these? this elder son also then has friends, who are not his father’s friends: see Matthew 22:16, τ. μαθητὰς αὐτῶν μετὰ τῶν ἡρωδιανῶν.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-15.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 15:29. τοσαῦτα ἔτη, these so many years) In antithesis to ὅτε, as soon as, in Luke 15:30.— δουλεύω, I serve) A confession of the slave-like spirit which influenced him. He does not add [in the spirit of Sonship], Father.— ἔδωκας, thou hast never given) much less wouldest thou kill [ ἔθυσεν, mactavit, Luke 15:27],— ἔριφον, a kid) much less the calf, Luke 15:27.— φίλων, my friends) In antithesis to πορνῶν, harlots, Luke 15:30.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-15.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 15:25".

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 15:29". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-15.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

никогда не преступал приказания твоего Едва ли это так, ведь здесь сын проявил очевидное неуважение к своему отцу, выраженное в его отказе участвовать в великой отцовской радости. Это вскрывает греховность слов всех религиозных лицемеров. Они не способны признать свои грехи и покаяться (см. пояснения к Мф. 9:12, 13; 19:16-20).Критическое замечание старшего сына отдает тем же духом, что и слова фарисея в 18:11.

ты никогда не дал мне и козленка По-видимому, все годы службы отцу им исключительно сильно двигала заинтересованность в том, что он может получить для себя. Для общественного мнения это самоправедное поведение сына было более приемлемо, чем распущенность младшего брата, но оно было не менее оскорбительным для отца, и в нем необходимо было покаяться.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-15.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“But he answered and said to his father, ‘Lo, these many years do I slave for you, and I never transgressed a commandment of yours, and yet you never gave me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends, but when this your son came, who has devoured your living with harlots, you kill for him the fatted calf.’ ”

The elder brother could not hold back his fury. He pointed out belligerently how for years he had slaved, and had never transgressed against any of his father’s orders, and yet when had his father ever thrown a party for him, or given him a kid so that he could invite his friends for a meal? But now that this worthless and dishonest son (note ‘this your son’, not ‘my brother’) had arrived back, who had cheated them and wasted so much of the family’s wealth on prostitutes (the worst thing he could think of at the time) what happened? The fatted calf was killed in order to celebrate his return. It did not seem fair.

We note how extravagant his argument is. For in fact the younger son’s friends had not been invited to the present celebration, and the probability is that if he himself had at some time wanted to invite his friends round he could have done so. He has patently manufactured a case in his own mind in order to make it seem as bad as possible. And we see how he saw his life, not as a joyful day by day life lived with his father as they worked together and enjoyed their privileges, but as a burden and a care and a trial, as something to be endured, the way in fact in which many religious people see it, especially those like the Pharisees. But before we criticise him too much we must remember that Jesus has drawn him like this in order that he might illustrate the Pharisees. It was probably one of the Pharisees’ strongest arguments, both to themselves and to others, that all their slaving to keep the commandments and to ‘do what God wanted’ would bring its own reward, a reward lost to those who did not live as they did. And that may well have been part of the reason for their antagonism against Jesus. He appeared to overlook all their hard efforts, and yet freely forgave those who had done nothing to deserve it. Like the elder brother they were unable to rejoice in the free grace of God to sinners. It did not seem fair. And it was in order to bring about a change in this attitude that Jesus was telling the parable. For He was as much concerned with bringing the Pharisees round to a new way of thinking, and to a sense of compassion, as He was to bringing the public servants and sinners to repentance.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-15.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

29.Do I serve thee—The word serve here is the service of a slave, and hence some have held it as characterizing the Pharisee’s devotion to God.

A kid—Far inferior to the fatted calf.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-15.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 15:29. Lo, for so many years do I serve thee. The legal idea comes out here, pleading what has been done.

I never transgressed a commandment of thine. The Pharisees virtually said this. The words of the elder son prove that his obedience in the past had not been hearty, and that he was now in opposition to his fathers will.

And yet thou never gavest me a kid. In contrast with ‘the fatted calf.’

With my friends, ‘respectable people,’ he implies, in contrast with ‘harlots.’ This proud, self-seeking, unaffection-ate son is now the lost son. Self-righteousness is dissatisfied with the reward it receives. The essential failure of Pharisaism is its want of love to God despite its external obedience.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-15.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 15:29. , a kid, not to speak of the fatted calf.— : he would have been content if there had been any room made for the festive element in his life, with a modest meeting with his own friends, not to speak of a grand family demonstration like this. But no, there was nothing but work and drudgery for him.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-15.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

I have never transgressed, &c. With what face could the Jews, represented here by the eldest son, say they have never transgressed the commandments of their father? This made Tertullian think that this was not the expression of the Jews, but of the faithful Christians; and, therefore, he interprets the whole parable as applied to a disciple of Christ. But we should recollect, that it is not uncommon for presumption to boast of what it never has done. The whole history of the Jews is full of numberless details of their prevarication and disobedience. (Calmet) --- A kid, &c. The Jews demanded a kid, but the Christians a lamb; therefore was Barabbas set at liberty for them, whilst for us the lamb was immolated. (St. Ambrose)

====================

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-15.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Lo. Greek. idou. App-133. Figure of speech Asterismos. App-6.

neither transgressed I, &c. This was the Pharisees" claim and boast. Compare Luke 18:11, Luke 18:12; Luke 18:18-21.

a kid. In contrast with "the fatted calf" (Luke 15:23). with. Greek. meta. App-104.

friends. Contrast with harlots (Luke 15:30.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he answering said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment: and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends:

And he answering said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment. These last words are not to be pressed beyond their manifest intention-to express the constancy of his own love and service as a son toward his father, in contrast with the conduct of his brother. So Job, when resenting the charge of hypocrisy, brought against him by his friends, speaks as if nothing whatever could be laid to his charge: "When he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold," etc. (Job 23:10-12). And David too (Psalms 18:20-24); and the Church, in a time of persecution for righteousness' sake (Psalms 44:17-22). And the father in the sequel of this parable (Luke 15:31) attests the truth of his son's protestation.

And yet thou never gavest me a kid ('I say not a calf, but not even a kid,') that I might make merry with my friends. Here lay his misapprehension. It was no entertainment for the gratification of the prodigal: it was a father's expression of the joy he felt at his recovery.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(29) Lo, these many years do I serve thee.—The very word “I serve,” as a slave serves, is eminently suggestive. The obedience had all along been servile, prompted by fear and hope, even as the slave’s obedience is. The language put into the mouth of the elder son is clearly meant to represent the habitual thoughts of the Pharisees. They are taken, as it were, after our Lord’s manner, as seen in the previous parables, at their own valuation of themselves. They are conscious of no transgressions; but in that very unconsciousness lies the secret of the absence of any sense of joy in being forgiven, of any power to sympathise with the joy of others, even of any satisfaction in the service in which they pride themselves. (Comp. Notes on Luke 7:47-50.) They are scandalised at the gladness which others feel when a penitent returns to God. It seems like an insult and wrong to themselves. Their life has been one of uniform obedience; they have performed their religious duties. Why is so much stir made about those who have fallen as they never fell?

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he answering said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment: and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends:
Lo
17:10; 18:9,11,12,20,21; 1 Samuel 15:13,14; Isaiah 58:2,3; 65:5; Zechariah 7:3; Matthew 20:12; Romans 3:20,27; 7:9; 10:3; Philippians 3:4-6; 1 John 1:8-10; Revelation 3:17
yet
7; 19:21; Malachi 1:12,13; 3:14; Revelation 2:17
Reciprocal: Genesis 34:5 - now his;  Judges 15:1 - a kid;  Matthew 19:20 - All;  Matthew 19:27 - what;  Matthew 25:24 - I knew;  Mark 2:17 - They that are whole;  Luke 15:2 - General

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 15:29". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-15.html.