Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 15:31

And he said to him, ‘Son, you have always been with me, and all that is mine is yours.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Inheritance;   Jealousy;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Joy;   Penitent;   Prodigal Son;   Readings, Select;   Salvation;   Self-Righteousness;   Young Men;   Thompson Chain Reference - Prodigal Son;   Son;   The Topic Concordance - Losing and Things Lost;   Salvation;   Seeking;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Parables;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Grace;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Ethics;   Gospel;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Parable;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Economic Life;   Harmony of the Gospels;   Imagery;   Jesus, Life and Ministry of;   Luke, Gospel of;   Parables;   Prodigal Son;   Repentance;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Love, Lover, Lovely, Beloved;   Parable;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Brotherhood (2);   Children of God;   Debt, Debtor (2);   Father, Fatherhood;   Gospel (2);   Justice (2);   Living (2);   Love (2);   Luke, Gospel According to;   Man (2);   Parable;   Religious Experience;   Righteous, Righteousness;   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Son, Sonship;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Have;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for November 6;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

All that I have is thine - See on Luke 15:28; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

All I have is thine - The property was divided. What remained was in reality the older son‘s. He was heir to it all, and had a right, if he chose, to use it. He had, therefore, no right to complain.

This instructive and beautiful parable was designed to vindicate the conduct of Jesus to show that it was right to receive sinners, and that the conduct of the Pharisees was unreasonable. The older son represents the Pharisees; the younger, the returning sinner, whether Jew or Gentile; and the father, God, who is willing to receive them. The parable had the designed effect. It silenced the adversaries of Jesus and vindicated his own conduct. There is not, perhaps, anywhere to be found a more beautiful and touching narrative than this. Every circumstance is tender and happily chosen; every word has a meaning; every image is beautiful; and the narrative closes just where it is fitted to make the deepest impression. In addition to what has been suggested, we may learn from this parable the following lessons:

1. That the disposition of a sinner is selfish. He desires to get all that he can, and is impatient of delay, Luke 15:12.

2. Sinners waste their blessings, and reduce themselves to a state of want and wretchedness, Luke 15:13. A life of sin brings on spiritual want and misery. It destroys the faculties, benumbs the mind, hardens the heart, abuses the beneficence of God, and makes us careless of him who gave us all that we have, and indifferent to the consequences of our own conduct.

3. Sinners disregard the future woes that will come upon them. The young man cared not for any calamities that might be the result of his conduct. He went on heedlessly - like every sinner to enjoy himself, and to squander what the toils of his father had procured for him.

4. Afflictions are often the means of bringing sinners to reflection, Luke 15:14. While his property lasted the prodigal cared little about his father. When that was gone, and he was in the midst of a famine, he thought of his ways. When sinners are in prosperity they think little about God. When he takes away their mercies, and they are called to pass through afflictions, then they think of their ways, and remember that God can give them comfort.

5. We have here an impressive exhibition of the wants and woes of a sinner.

(1)he had spent all. He had nothing. So the sinner. He has no righteousness, no comfort.

(2)he was far from God, away from his father, and in a land of strangers. The sinner has wandered, and has no friend. His miseries came upon him “because” he was so far away from God.

(3)his condition was wretched. He was needy, in famine, and without a friend. So the sinner. His condition is aptly denoted by that of the prodigal, who would gladly have partaken of the food of the swine. The sinner has taken the world for his portion, and it neither supplies the wants of his soul, nor gives him comfort when he is far away from his Father‘s home and from God.

6. The sinner in this situation often applies to the wrong source for comfort, Luke 15:15. The prodigal should at once have returned to his father, but he rather chose to become a servant of a citizen of that region. The sinner, when sensible of his sins, should return at once to God; but he often continues still to wander. He tries new objects. He seeks new pleasures and new friends, and finds them equally unsatisfactory. He engages in new pursuits, but all in vain. He is still comfortless, and in a strange, a famished land,

7. The repentance required in the gospel is a return to a right mind, Luke 15:17. Before his conversion the sinner was alienated from God. He was spiritually deranged. He saw not things as they are. Now he looks on the world as vain and unsatisfactory, and comes to himself. He thinks “aright” of God, of heaven, of eternity, and resolves to seek his happiness there. No man regards things as they are but he who sees the world to be vain, and eternity to be near and awful; and none acts with a “sane mind” but he who acts on the belief that he must soon die; that there is a God and a Saviour - a heaven and a hell.

8. When the sinner returns he becomes sensible of the following things:

(1)That he is in danger of perishing, and must soon die but for relief - “I perish with hunger.”

(2)that God is willing and able to save him - “How and to spare.” There is abundance of mercy for all, and all may come.

(3)he begins to cherish a hope that this may be his. God is willing, and he feels that all that is needful is for him to go to him.

(4)he resolves to go to God - “I will arise and go.”

(5)he comes to him willing to confess all his sins, and desirous of concealing none - “I will say, Father, I have sinned.”

9. True repentance is a voluntary act. It is not forced. It is the resolution of the sinner to go, and he cheerfully and cordially arises and goes, Luke 15:18.

10. A real penitent feels that his sins have been committed against God, Luke 15:18.

11. A true penitent also is willing to acknowledge his offences against his parents, brothers, friends, and all people, Luke 15:18.

12. A real penitent is humble, Luke 15:18. He has no wish to conceal anything, or to be thought more highly of than he “ought” to be.

13. God is willing to receive the true penitent, and has made the richest provision for his return and for his comfort. None need to hesitate to go. All who go, feeling that they are poor, and miserable, and blind, and naked, will find God willing to receive them, and none will be sent empty away.

14. The joy at the return of sinners is great. Angels rejoice over it, and all holy beings are glad.

15. We should not be envious at any favors that God may be pleased to bestow on others, Luke 15:32. He has given “us” more than we deserve; and if, by the sovereignty of his grace, he is pleased to endow others with more grace, or to give them greater talents, or to make them more useful, “we” have no cause to complain. We should rather rejoice that he is pleased to give such mercies to any of our race, and should praise him for the manifestation of his goodness, whether made to us or to other people.

16. The sensible joy when the sinner returns to God is often greater than that which may be felt “after” the return, and yet the real “cause” of rejoicing be no greater. In times of revival, the sensible joy of Christians may be greater than in ordinary seasons. Their graces are quickened, their zeal kindled, and their hopes strengthened.

17. If God is willing to receive sinners, if all holy beings rejoice, then how should Christians strive for their conversion, and seek for their return!

18. If God is willing to receive sinners “now,” then all should at once return. There “will” be a time when he will not be willing to receive them. The day of mercy will be ended; and from the misery and want of this wretched world, they will go down to the deeper miseries and wants of a world of despair where hope never comes; from whence the sinner can never return; and where the cheering thought can never enter the mind that in his Father‘s house there is bread enough and to spare, or where he must feel that if there “is,” it will be forever untasted by the wretched prodigal in the land of eternal famine and death.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-15.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And he said unto him, Son, thou art ever with me, and all that is mine is thine.

See under Luke 15:29. At the time Jesus spoke this parable, the issue of whether or not the Pharisees would give up their selfishness and enter, with the Gentiles, into the banquet prepared for all in the house of the Father, had not yet been determined; and fittingly, the parable closed with the elder son still outside, and the father still entreating. The dramatic scene is one of impending tragedy; for, in the last resolution of the problem, the elder son remained outside the house of joy and feasting.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-15.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he said to him, son,.... For so he was, as before observed, by creation, national adoption, and profession:

thou art ever with me; not in such a sense as Christ the Son of God was: nor can it design the gracious presence of God, or communion with him; for this man did not walk with God; and besides, this is more frequently expressed by God's being with his people, than by their being with him; nor are good men always with God, or God with them, in this sense; sometimes the phrase designs the saints being with God, or Christ, in heaven; but here it intends only attendance on public worship, in the place where the symbol of God's presence was, the temple; and the "ever" denotes the term of the legal dispensation, which in many branches of it, as circumcision, the passover, and other ordinances and statutes, is said to be for ever.

And all that I have is thine: which must be understood with a limitation; for it cannot mean, that he had all the perfections of God, as Christ the Son of God has; nor all spiritual blessings, as the adopted sons of God have; nor indeed any of them, but all the outward ordinances of the legal dispensation, which belonged to the Jews; particularly those that are enumerated in Romans 9:4 as the adoption, the glory, the covenants, the giving of the law, the service of God, the promises, their descent from the fathers, and the Messiah's descent from them; they had him in person among them, and his personal ministry, the word and ordinances of the Gospel; and had as much as they could have, or desire to have, in an external way.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-15.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Son, etc. — The father resents not the insult - how could he, after the largeness of heart which had kissed the returning prodigal? He calmly expostulates with him, “Son, listen to reason. What need for special, exuberant joy over thee? Didst thou say, ‹Lo, these many years do I serve thee?‘ In that saidst thou truly; but just for that reason do I not set the whole household a-rejoicing over thee. For thee is reserved what is higher still - a tranquil lifelong satisfaction in thee, as a true-hearted faithful son in thy father‘s house, nor of the inheritance reserved for thee is aught alienated by this festive and fitting joy over the once foolish but now wise and newly recovered one.”

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Son (ΤεκνονTeknon). Child.

Thou (συsu). Expressed and in emphatic position in the sentence. He had not appreciated his privileges at home with his father.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-15.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he said unto him, Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine.

Thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine — This suggests a strong reason against murmuring at the indulgence shown to the greatest of sinners. As the father's receiving the younger son did not cause him to disinherit the elder; so God's receiving notorious sinners will be no loss to those who have always served him; neither will he raise these to a state of glory equal to that of those who have always served him, if they have, upon the whole, made a greater progress in inward as well as outward holiness.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-15.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he said unto him, Son, thou art ever with me1, and all that is mine is thine2.

  1. Son, thou art ever with me. A privilege which the elder brother had counted as naught, or rather as slavery.

  2. And all that is mine is thine. The younger brother had the robe, ring, and shoes (Luke 15:22), but the elder still had the inheritance.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-15.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

31 And he said unto him, Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine.

Ver. 31. All that I have is thine] In thy conceit at least. Thou holdest thyself happy howsoever, and seemeth to have one foot already in the porch of paradise. Self-deceivers will needlessly set up their counter for a thousand pounds, and will not believe but their penny is very good silver. They lay claim to all, as the madman of Athens did to all the ships that came into that harbour, as his.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-15.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 15:31

What is the moral significance of the incident of the Elder Son?

I. It is, some writers tell us, to mark the contrast between the narrow, merciless heart of the self-righteous man, as compared with the comprehensive, all-forgiving love of our heavenly Father. He who had been most sinned against—he whose the property had been which a profligate son had wasted—was ready to forgive; the other, far less injured, had only words of discontent and anger for his father's large-hearted mercy. It is possible that this contrast was intended, but I am sure it is not the principal purpose of the incident.

II. To determine what that significance really is, let us consider in the first place what the series of parables would be without it. Let us suppose that this series ended with the loving—even enthusiastic—reception of the younger son a this father's house. Might not the thought then be suggested. "If it be true that a profligate who repents is more pleasing in the sight of God than one who has led a consistently virtuous life, is it not better that I should do as this young man did? "This was the thought which passed through the mind of the elder son. The father's reply seems to have been intended to correct an erroneous inference which might, not unnaturally, be drawn, and which the elder son did actually draw. It is in its tone rather soothing than reproachful, meant to correct a mistake, and so to remove the anger which this mistake had caused; but not, as far as I can see, condemning the anger as at all unreasonable under the mistake. The Author of these parables foresaw that men might draw from them the false but not unnatural inference, that God prefers deep sinfulness, followed by true repentance, to a continuance in welldoing. To prevent such a mistake, this very objection is put into the mouth of the elder son. And in the reply of the father is fixed the true position of the repentant sinner. He is received with forgiveness, with welcome, with joy; but he does not take, in the estimation of his heavenly Father, the place of him "who by patient continuance in welldoing seeks for glory and honour and immortality."

J. H. Jellett, The Elder Son and Other Sermons, p. 1.


References: Luke 15:31.—Preacher's Monthly, vol. i., p. 375; Sermons from Lent to Passiontide, p. 451; J. Ferrier, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxxii., p. 211; G. Matheson, Moments on the Mount, p. 115. Luke 15:32.—J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 10th series, p. 86. E. Cooper, Practical Sermons, vol. iii., p. 178. Luke 15—A. B. Bruce, The Training of the Twelve, p. 27; F. D. Maurice, The Gospel of the Kingdom of Heaven, p. 233. Luke 16:1.—J. E. Vaux, Sermon Notes, 2nd series, p. 18. Luke 16:1-8.—H. W. Beecher, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xi., p. 346; Preacher's Monthly, vol. vii., p. 377; C. Kingsley, Town and Country Sermons, p. 356. Luke 16:1-9.—Homiletic Quarterly, vol. i, p. 345. Luke 16:1-10.—H. Calderwood, The Parables, p. 266; A. B. Bruce, The Parabolic Teaching of Christ, p. 355. Luke 16:1-12.—Homiletic Quarterly, p. 503; Ibid., vol. vi., p. 34; Clergyman's Magazine, vol. iii., p. 19; R. C. Trench, Notes on the Parables, p. 427.



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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-15.html.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

31.] πάντοτε μ. ἐμ. εἶ, as a reason why no extraordinary joy should be shewn over him; other reasons might be assigned, and lie indeed in the background, suggested by his tone and words: but this is the soft answer to turn away wrath.

πάντα τὰ ἑμὰ σά ἐσ., because the portion of goods which remained was his.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-15.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 15:31. εἶπεν, He said) He makes a twofold reply to the elder son’s twofold complaint.— τέκνον, son) He addresses him by a loving title [Being filled with joy to overflowing on account of the return of His once-lost son.—V. g.]; nor does the Father immediately put away from Him (cast off) the envious brother.— πάντοτε, always) and it is not therefore necessary to rejoice with peculiar joy, as if something extraordinary had occurred: see Luke 15:7, at the end of the verse.— μετʼ ἐμοῦ, with Me) It is better to rejoice (enjoy one’s self) with the Father, than with a company of friends. See Luke 15:29 [ ἵνα μετὰ τῶν φίλων μου εὐφρανθῶ].— πάντα, all things) This expresses the pre-eminent and peculiar privilege of the Jewish people.— τὰ ἐμὰ, which belong to Me) There is therefore no need that thou shouldest seek external friendships.— σά ἐστι, are thine) For the younger brother had received his share; and the elder-born had the priority of succession to the Father’s goods. Many things may possibly belong to the children of God, of which they are not privileged to have now the full enjoyment (usufructus). Therefore the elder brother ought not to have complained that a kid had never yet been given to him.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-15.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 15:25"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 15:31". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-15.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

все мое твое Наследство уже было разделено (ст. 12). Буквально все, что имел отец, было собственностью старшего сына. И все же старший сын завидовал даже любви, которую отец проявил к блудному сыну. У фарисеев и книжников был свободный доступ ко всем богатствам Божьей истины. Они проводили свою жизнь, имея дело с Писанием и общественным богослужением, – но они никогда по-настоящему не владели ни одним из сокровищ, которыми пользуется кающийся грешник.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-15.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Thou art ever with me; so that thou hast the full enjoyment of the portion of the estate reserved for thee.

All that I have is thine; the younger son having received his portion of the estate, what remained would be now enjoyed by the other son, and fall to him when the father had done with it.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-15.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“And he said to him, ‘Son, you are ever with me, and all that is mine is yours.’ ”

His father then gently explained the situation. ‘Son.’ This was a tender and loving way of addressing him. He wanted his son to know how much he appreciated him. ‘You are ever with me.’ He also wanted him to know how much he appreciated his loyalty. He acknowledged that all his life he had been faithful, never going astray. ‘And all that is mine is yours.’ Far from begrudging him a kid he wanted him to know that everything that the family owned was his. Whether we are to see this as signifying that this had been made officially so at the time when the younger son received his portion, which seems probable, or whether it was to be seen as tacitly understood, it was as the father saw it. Thus he would lose nothing by his brother’s return. It was his right and it would not be taken from him.

It was also an assurance to all who heard Jesus that no one who had genuinely served God would lose out by it. If their hearts were right towards God then God would take account of all that they had done (Romans 14:10). Jesus recognised that there were at this stage genuine people among the Pharisees and Scribes and He was appealing to them. They would not lose their reward. God would reward faithful service. But let them not therefore be lacking in compassion and mercy. And He was putting up a case that no one could destroy. If any did lose out it would be as a result of their own fault.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-15.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

31.All I have is thine—Thou art still my son; thou hast not been disinherited; what I have is still within my reach as ever. The captious Scribes and Pharisees were still in Church relations ever with God. Yet they were forfeiting their organic sonship by being, like this sons angry because Jesus was calling the wanderers home. And mark that the son in the parable stays without; and without the parable leaves him. After the parable has thus fulfilled its immediate object, it may be applied to a great variety of equivalent cases. We may truly, then, say that the elder son is the Jews, and the younger the Gentiles; and that the return of the prodigal is the restoration of the Gentiles to the Church of God. The elder son, the Jews, is still angry and without; but he, too, may ultimately re-enter his father’s house in joy. The true lesson for these Pharisees is, that it is a poor and pitiful piety which wraps itself in a cold and selfish sanctity, and never smiles in gladness when sinners come home to God. And yet we must guard against the error of supposing that the repentant are dearer to God than the life-long Christian. For, as Philo the Jew says, “there ever remain in the souls of the repentant the scars and traces of ancient sins.”

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-15.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 15:31. Son. Still affectionate God has forbearing kindness toward the self-righteous and uncharitable.

Thou art ever with me. No occasion for extraordinary joy had arisen in his case.

All that is mine is thine. Only the portion of the elder son remained in the father’s hands.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-15.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Son =. Child. Greek. teknon. Affectionately reminding him of his birth. App-108.

ever = always. App-151.

all that I have. See Romans 9:4, Romans 9:5, and compare Matthew 20:14.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he said unto him, Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine.

And he said unto him, Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine. The father resents not the insult-how could he, after the largeness of heart which had kissed the returning prodigal? He calmly expostulates with him, 'Son, listen to reason. What need for special, exuberant joy over thee? Saidst thou not, "Lo, these many years do I serve thee"? Wherefore then set the whole household a rejoicing for thee? For thee is reserved what is higher still-the tranquil life-long satisfaction of thy father in thee, as a true-hearted faithful son in thy father's house; nor of the inheritance reserved for thee is anything alienated by this festive and fitting joy over the once foolish but now wise and newly recovered son.'

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-15.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(31) Son, thou art ever with me.—As applied to the Pharisees in its primary bearing, or to others like the Pharisees in its secondary, it appears at first sight as if the words were spoken from their own point of view, their own self-appreciation, and were therefore ironical. We need not, however, so take them. The words were literally true of the Pharisees, of Israel as a nation, of all who reproduce the Pharisee temper. All outward gifts that God could bestow, the covenants and the law, and the promises, outward ordinances of worship, and the instruction of wise men and scribes—these had all been given to Israel, as like blessings are offered now to all members of the visible Church of Christ, the great family of God. All that was wanted was the power to use these things rightly, as the Father wills, and therefore to enjoy them.

All that I have is thine.—More literally, all mine is thine.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he said unto him, Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine.
19:22,23; Matthew 20:13-16; Mark 7:27,28; Romans 9:4; 11:1,35
Reciprocal: Genesis 4:6 - GeneralMatthew 20:14 - thine

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-15.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

31.Son, (544) thou art always with me. This answer consists of two parts. The first is, that the first-born son has no reason to be angry, when he sees his brother kindly received without any loss to himself; (545) and the second is, that, without paying any regard to his brother’s safety, he is grieved on account of the rejoicing occasioned by his return. All my property, says he, is thine: that is, “Though thou hast hitherto carried nothing away out of my house, it has been no loss to the for all is reserved for thee undiminished.” (546) Besides, why art thou offended at our joy, in which thou oughtest to have shared? for it was proper that thy brother, who we thought had been lost, should now be congratulated on his safety and return. Those two reasons deserve our attention; for, on the one hand, it is no loss to us, (547) if God graciously receives into favor those who had been at variance with him on account of their sins; and, on the other hand, it is wicked hardness of heart not to rejoice, when we see our brethren returned from death to life. (548)

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 15:31". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-15.html. 1840-57.