Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 17:1

He said to His disciples, "It is inevitable that stumbling blocks come, but woe to him through whom they come!
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus, the Christ;   Wicked (People);   The Topic Concordance - Offense;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Stumbling block;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Jesus Christ;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Eschatology;   Tribulation, the;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Heresy;   Luke, the Gospel According to;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel of;   Offense;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Matthew, Gospel According to;   Offence;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Discourse;   Elect, Election ;   Fierceness;   Hindrance;   Impossibility;   Love (2);   Manuscripts;   Woe;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Stumbling Block,;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Forgiveness;   Impossible;   Keys, Power of;   Offence;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for May 7;   Every Day Light - Devotion for April 29;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

It is impossible but that offenses will come - Such is the corrupt state of the human heart that, notwithstanding all the influences of grace, and the promises of glory, men will continue to sin against God; and his justice must continue to punish. See on Matthew 18:6; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-17.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

In this chapter, the teaching of Jesus is continued by four definite pronouncements, which are perhaps highlights of an extensive discourse, the exact connection of which is difficult to discern, (Luke 17:1-10), the healing of ten lepers (Luke 17:11-19), and the teaching concerning the second coming of the Lord (Luke 17:20-37).

Between Luke 17:10 and Luke 17:11, Christ made a journey to Jerusalem for the purpose of raising Lazarus from the dead; and yet the only notice of that journey here is found in the words, "As they were on the way to Jerusalem" (Luke 17:11). The marvelous significance of this will be noted under that verse.

And he said unto his disciples, It is impossible but that occasions of stumbling should come; but woe unto him through whom they come. It were well for him if a millstone were hanged about his neck, and he were thrown into the sea, rather than that he should cause one of these little ones to stumble. (Luke 17:1-2)

This is the first of four sayings, held by many to be independent teachings of Jesus, unconnected with the discourse or circumstance in which Luke has placed them. Of course, if that is what they are, there can be no finding fault with such an arrangement by the sacred historian; because Mark also frequently reported such independent items of Jesus' marvelous teaching. This writer, however, strongly feels that there is a connection which will be noted in each of the four sayings.

Jesus had just finished the parable of Dives and Lazarus, which closed with the implication that Dives had influenced his five brothers to follow a sinful course, an error which he vainly sought to correct from the spirit world. Jesus quite logically moved to warn those yet living against such a sin. Spence agreed that "There does seem a clear connection here with the narrative immediately preceding."Luke 2p. 86">[1] After noting the opinions of many to the contrary, Geldenhuys also said, "It appears to us that there is a unity between the various pronouncements and that (although Luke does not say so) they were uttered on one and the same occasion."[2]

Hobbs thought the four sayings might be entitled "Four things of which the Christian should beware." These were enumerated by him as "the sin of tempting others (Luke 17:1-2), ... the sin of an unforgiving spirit (Luke 17:3-4), ... the sin of overlooking the power of faith in this (Luke 17:5-6), ... and the sin of supposing that one may merit salvation (Luke 17:7-10).[3] We fully agree with Hobbs that there are four pronouncements here, not merely two, as indicated by the paragraphing in the English Revised Version (1885).

The Pharisees, who were constantly on the fringe of every audience Jesus ever addressed, were at that very moment trying to cause the Twelve themselves to stumble; and Jesus spoke in the most stern manner against those who would pervert the faith of others.

Occasions of stumbling ... Bliss observed that the Greek word rendered STUMBLING "meant the trigger of a trap, contact with which would cause the trap to spring."[4] Therefore, although addressed to his disciples, this warning far exceeded anything that the Twelve might have needed. It is God's pronouncement of eternal wrath against those who lay a trap to destroy the faith of others.

One of these little ones ... is a characteristic reference of Jesus to those who are "babes in Christ," whose faith is young and weak.

Millstone ... The teaching here is that physical death is a far more desirable fate than that which is reserved for those whose intent is to destroy the faith of others. The millstone in view here weighed about forty pounds; and, although Matthew quoted the Lord as referring to "a millstone drawn by an ass," a much larger stone, those commentators who style that a contradiction must be kidding. A forty-pound stone around the neck would have the same effect as a stone ten times as large, if the wearer of either were thrown into the sea.

Luke 2p. 86">[1] H. D. M. Spence, The Pulpit Commentary (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1962), Vol. 16, Luke 2p. 86

[2] Norval Geldenhuys, Commentary on the Gospel of Luke (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1951), p. 431.

[3] Herschel H. Hobbs, An Exposition of the Gospel of Luke (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Book House, 1966), p. 245.

[4] George R. Bliss, An American Commentary on the New Testament (Valley Forge, Pennsylvania: The Judson Press, n.d.) p. 258.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then said he unto his disciples,.... In the Alexandrian copy, and in "three" of Beza's exemplars it is read, "his disciples"; and so read the Vulgate Latin, and all the Oriental versions; that is, Jesus said to his disciples what follows, as the Syriac and Persic versions express, and the latter reads, he said "again". About the time that he delivered the above parable concerning the rich man and Lazarus, he repeated to his disciples what he had before said to them on another occasion, Matthew 18:7

it is impossible but that offences will come; considering the decree of God, the malice of Satan, the wickedness of men, the corruption both of their principles and practices. The Ethiopic version renders it, "temptation will come"; that which will be trying to the faith of the saints, and a stumblingblock to weak minds, as reproach and persecution, errors, and heresies, and the evil lives of professors:

but woe unto him through whom they come; See Gill on Matthew 18:7

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-17.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Then said he unto the disciples, 1 It is impossible but that offences will come: but woe [unto him], through whom they come!

(1) The Church is of necessity subject to offences, but the Lord will not suffer them unpunished, if any of the least be offended.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-17.html. 1599-1645.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

It is impossible (ανενδεκτον εστινanendekton estin). See ουκ ενδεχεταιouk endechetai in Luke 13:33. Alpha privative (ανan -) and ενδεκτοςendektos verbal adjective, from ενδεχομαιendechomai The word occurs only in late Greek and only here in the N.T. The meaning is inadmissible, unallowable.

But that occasions of stumbling should come (του τα σκανδαλα μη ελτεινtou ta skandala mē elthein). This genitive articular infinitive is not easy to explain. In Acts 10:25 there is another example where the genitive articular infinitive seems to be used as a nominative (Robertson, Grammar, p. 1040). The loose Hebrew infinitive construction may have a bearing here, but one may recall that the original infinitives were either locatives -(ενιeni) or datives -(αιai). Τα σκανδαλαTa skandala is simply the accusative of general reference. Literally, the not coming as to occasions of stumbling. For σκανδαλονskandalon (a trap) See note on Matthew 5:29; and the note on Matthew 16:23. It is here only in Luke. The positive form of this saying appears in Matthew 18:7.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-17.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Impossible ( ἀνένδεκτον )

Inadmissible. Only here in New Testament. See on it cannot be, Luke 13:33.

Offences

See on offend, Matthew 5:29; and compare on Matthew 16:23.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-17.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

It is impossible but offences will come - And they ever did and do come chiefly by Pharisees, that is, men who trust in themselves that they are righteous, and despise others. Matthew 18:6 ; Mark 9:42 .
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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-17.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he said unto his disciples, It is impossible2 but that occasions of stumbling should come3; but woe unto him, through whom they come!
    SECOND GREAT GROUP OF PARABLES. (Probably in Perea.) G. CONCERNING OFFENSES, FAITH, AND SERVICE. Luke 17:1-10

  1. And he said unto the disciples. Jesus here ceases to speak to the Pharisees, and begins a new series of sayings addressed to the disciples, which sayings are, however, pertinent to the occasion, and not wholly disconnected with what he has just been saying.

  2. It is impossible. In a world where Pharisees abound (1 Corinthians 11:19).

  3. But that occasions of stumbling should come. See 1 Corinthians 11:19.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-17.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Unto him, &c.; that is, unto him who tempts or entices others to sin.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-17.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Then said he unto the disciples, It is impossible but that offences will come: but woe unto him, through whom they come!

Ver. 1. {See Trapp on "Matthew 18:6"} {See Trapp on "Matthew 18:7"}

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-17.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 17:1

I. We understand from such a sentence as this, what a true, calm judgment of life the New Testament furnishes. It tells us the worst; it does not gloss things over. Its writers and teachers are not carried away by enthusiasm. They do not paint the world, even as it is to be in the light of Christian truth as a Utopia, a happy dreamland of perfection. We remember who it was that pronounced this sentence. Not one who despaired of humanity, not a cynic to whom its weaknesses were matter for sarcasm, but one who, for all its vice and weakness, "so loved the world," and so hoped all things and believed all things of the world, that He came from heaven to live in it and to die for it. And yet, in spite of this, He could say calmly, "It is impossible"—so God had allowed it to be—and proceed to warn and to persuade and to work for men and with men, as though the necessary existence of temptation did not lessen human responsibility, or make impossible the preservation of innocence or the growth of holiness.

II. Notice two or three applications of our Lord's words. (1) A life of selfish enjoyment can hardly escape being a life through which offence comes. It is hard to live before others a life which is easier than theirs—more guarded and furnished with appliances of comfort and pleasure—without causing some harm to them, it may be by rousing envy, it may more easily be by setting before them a wrong ideal, strengthening in them the dangerous sense that a man's life consists in the abundance of the things that he possesses. (2) Our Lord's words give the key to one side of human sin and wretchedness. "It is impossible but that offences will come"—impossible but that one man's wickedness or folly should lead to sin and wretchedness in others; impossible even in a world Christian in name and profession; impossible even when men are trying in a sense and degree to live as Christians. It is a question that we must be always asking ourselves, whether we are so living as to help or to injure these near us—those who look up to us, those who breathe the same air with us, those who will in any way form a standard from our acts and character.

E. C. Wickham, Wellington College Sermons, p. 232.


Reference: Luke 17:3-5.—Good Words, vol. iii., p. 700.


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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-17.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 17:1. Then said he unto the disciples, Having been derided by the Pharisees as a visionary, and insulted on account of his doctrine concerning the pernicious influence of the love of money, our Lord took occasion to speak of affronts and offences, — Σκανδαλα, stumbling-blocks, provocations to sin; and though he represented such things as highly useful in respect of the exercise and improvement which they afford to holiness and virtue; and unavoidable by reason of the pride, anger, revenge, malice, and other jarring passions of men, he did not fail to set forth their evil nature in their dreadful punishment. To understand our Lord in the passage before us, it is necessary that we attend to an obvious distinction. All offences or temptations are not of the same nature; some of them are things in themselves sinful; others of them are things innocent: Jesus speaks of the first sort; nor has he denounced against the authors of them a greater punishment than they deserve; because to their own intrinsicmalignity such things have this added, that they prove stumbling-blocks to others; and so are of the most atrocious nature. When the other sort of offences happen to be mentioned, they are spoken of in milder terms: if the offence be given to a fellow-Christian, the person guilty of it is peculiarly blamed for wanting that love towards his brother, which the Christian religion enjoins. If it be given to a heathen, he is charged with being deficient in due concern for the glory of God: in the mean time, it must be observed on this head, that though the weakness of well-meaning persons,—who, by relying on our example, may be led to imitate us in things which they think sinful,—is a strong reason in point of charity, why we should forbear those actions, however innocent, (unless we are under the greatest necessity of doing them;) yet the perverseness of malicious minds, that are apt to misrepresent things, does by no means lay any obligations on a good man to forbear what he finds convenient for him, provided he himself knows it to be innocent; for the difference of the persons, who are apt to be affected by our example, greatly alters the case of offences, and our behaviour with relation to them. See the note on Matthew 18:5-6.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-17.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Two things are here observable, 1. The necessity of scandalous offences: It must needs be that offences come, if we consider men's corruptions, Satan's malice, God's permission and just judgment.

Observe, 2. The misery and mischief which comes by these scandals: Woe unto the world because of offences; woe to such as give the scandal: this is the woe of one denouncing: and woe to such as stumble at offences given; this is the woe of lamenting.

From the whole, note, 1. That scandals or offensive actions in the church of Christ will certainly happen, and frequently fall out among those that profess religion and the name of Christ: It is impossible but that offences will come.

Secondly, that scandalous and offensive actions from such as profess religion and the name of Christ, are baneful and fatal stumbling blocks to wicked and worldy men.

Thirdly, that the offences which wicked men take at the falls of the professors of religion, for the hardening of themselves in their wicked and sinful practices, is matter of just and great lamentation: Woe unto the world because of offences, Matthew 18:7

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-17.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

1.] τὰ σκ. is perhaps owing to some offence which had happened;—the departure of the Pharisees in disgust, or some point in their conduct; such as the previous chapter alluded to.

ἀνένδεκτόν ἐστιν = οὐκ ἐνδέχεται, ch. Luke 13:33.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-17.html. 1863-1878.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

Some very blessed Discourses of Christ are contained in this Chapter. The History of the Ten Lepers. Some of Christ's Prophecies.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/luke-17.html. 1828.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 17:1. ΄αθητὰς, disciples) as in ch. Luke 16:1.— ἀνένδεκτόν ἐστι) So οὐκ ἐνδέχεται, it is not a thing usual to happen [ προφήτην ἀπολέσθαι ἔξω ἱερουσαλήμ], ch. Luke 13:33 [lit. a thing not admissible in the common course of things].— ἐλθεῖν, come) especially through the instrumentality of the Pharisees. [And their deriding cavils, ch. Luke 14:14.—V. g.]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-17.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

LUKE CHAPTER 17

Luke 17:1,2 Christ teacheth to avoid giving occasions of offence,

Luke 17:3,4 and to forgive one another.

Luke 17:5-10 The power of faith, and defect of merit toward God in

our best services.

Luke 17:11-19 Christ healeth ten lepers,

Luke 17:20,21 showeth the spiritual nature of the kingdom of God,

Luke 17:22-37 and instructs his disciples concerning the coming

of the Son of man.

Ver. 1,2. See Poole on "Matthew 18:6". See Poole on "Matthew 18:7". See Poole on "Mark 9:42". This term skandala is used in the New Testament very variously; in general it signifies any thing which may be an occasion of mischief to another. Man, consisting of body and soul, may by something be made to stumble and fall, either with reference to the one, or to the other: thus, Leviticus 19:14. Thou shalt not put a stumblingblock before the blind: lyvbm Hebrew: so Proverbs 24:17. The mischief done to our souls is by sin; so as in the New Testament it often signifies any action of ours by which our brother is made to sin: which actions may be,

1. Good and necessary, and then the scandal is taken, not given. Or:

2. Wicked and abominable; hence we call some sins scandalous sins, such as give offence to others, and are examples alluring them to sin. Or:

3. Actions which in themselves are of an indifferent nature, neither commanded nor forbidden in the word. Our taking one part in these actions, rather than another, may be a scandal, that is, an offence.

What our Saviour here saith is certainly true concerning all these kinds of offences: considering the complexion of the world, and the corruption which is in man’s hearts,

it is impossible but that offences will come. But I must confess that I incline to think, that the offences primarily intended by our Saviour here are those of the second sort; and that by them are meant persecutions of the people of God; to the authors of which our Saviour denounces woe. So that our Saviour by this lets the world know, the special protection under which he hath taken his people; so as though he knew there would arise those who would hurt and destroy in his holy mountain, yet he declares that they shall not go unpunished, but they had better die the most certain death imaginable, (such must be the death of him who is thrown into the sea with a millstone about his neck), than to that degree expose himself to the vengeance of God; a guilt of that nature that there is not much more hope for him to escape God’s vengeance, than there would be of a man escaping with his life whom we should see thrown into the sea with a millstone appendant to him. I do very well know that it is also highly dangerous to tempt or solicit a child of God to sin, either by our words or actions; but I do not think it the design of our Lord in this place so much to express that as the other.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 17:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-17.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

соблазнам Т.е. «ловушкам». См. пояснение к Мф. 18:7.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-17.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Impossible; such is the wickedness of men, that they will commit sin, and tempt others to sin. Matthew 28:6-7; Mark 9:41-42. Men may be so wicked as to make it certain that they will commit great sins, and strongly tempt others to sin; and yet that certainty not diminish their responsibility or lessen their guilt.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-17.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

§ 94.JESUS FURTHER INSTRUCTS HIS DISCIPLES, Luke 17:1-10.

1.Then said he unto his disciples—At the close of the awful parable of the last chapter there seems to have been no answer from the conscience-stricken Pharisees, and the assembly, doubtless, broke up and departed in silence. It was not, however, a silence of reflection and repentance, but of perseverance in their course of impeding the conversion of the multitudes to Jesus, and of throwing stumbling-blocks in the way of his disciples. See notes on Luke 15:1. It was, therefore, on an occasion but little later, and probably after commencing his departure, that we suppose our Lord, in view of these efforts of theirs, to have addressed the following cautions to his disciples. See note on Luke 13:32.

Unto his disciples—Not to his apostles only, as in Luke 17:5. These disciples were the publicans and sinners; and perhaps others converted during our Lord’s Peraean ministry.

It is impossible but that—More literally, it is not to be expected but that offenses will come. This certainly arises not from a necessity upon the human agent or the human will to commit them. It is a necessity upon us to expect them, because we find that man will freely and responsibly commit them. The necessity does not make the will, but the will makes the necessity.

Offences—See our note on Matthew 18:7. The offence here is not simply an insult, but an incitement to anger. It is a betrayment into any sin, whether by temptation or by angering. It is any interposed impediment in our pursuit of truth and righteousness.

Woe unto him—Because he makes wicked not by necessity, but by his own free, voluntary wickedness.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-17.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 17:1. To his disciples. All the followers of our Lord who were present; since Luke 17:5 mentions ‘the Apostles.’

It is impossible, etc. See on Matthew 18:6-7. The connection is plain: the Pharisees had already derided Him (Luke 16:14), and, having taken greater offence at the last parable, had probably gone off. The design was to counteract the influence which this behavior might have upon the new disciples (‘the publicans and sinners’), who had been accustomed to look up to the Pharisees.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-17.html. 1879-90.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Luke 17:1. Then said he unto the disciples — Our Lord, about this time, thought proper to repeat to the people, who then attended on his ministry, and were desirous of being instructed by him, several particulars of his doctrine, which he had formerly delivered in a more private way to his apostles, and some others of his disciples, as follows: It is impossible but that offences will come — Considering the general corruption of human nature, the snares of the world, and the temptations of Satan, it cannot be but that one way or other offences will be given and taken: stumbling- blocks will be laid in the way of such as are travelling to the heavenly Jerusalem, and many will stumble at them, and fall over them; will be hindered in the way, or turned out of it; for many professing my religion will act in a manner very unsuitable to it, unworthy of themselves, and disgraceful to the holy name they bear. But wo unto him through whom they come — Let me warn you, therefore, as you love your own souls, to guard against the guilt and danger of being stumbling-blocks in the way of others. It were better for him, &c. — I assure you that such a one, especially he that by an immoral life proves a reproach and scandal to my cause, had better die by the hand of violence, and suffer the most shocking execution, than that he should offend, or cause to stumble and fall, one of these little ones, that is, one weak believer, or any other of my despised and persecuted followers. See on Matthew 18:7-9.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/luke-17.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

world being corrupted as it is, and the spread of evil so wide, it is impossible that scandals should not come. (Bible de Vence) --- It is impossible, morally speaking, with regard to the malice of men. (Witham)

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Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-17.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Then said He, &c. verses: Luke 17:1-2 contain matter which had been spoken by the Lord on a former occasion (Matthew 18:6, Matthew 18:7. Mark 9:42) and repeated here with a variation of certain words; verses: Luke 17:3, Luke 17:4 also had been spoken before, and recorded in Matthew 18:21, Matthew 18:22 (but not in Mark). The passage here is therefore not "out of its context", but is repeated with special reference to Luke 16:14-30. See App-97.

unto. Greek. pros. App-104.

the disciples. All the texts read "His disciples". This is to be noted in contrast with Luke 16:15.

impossible = inevitable. Greek. anendektos. Occurs only here.

offences = stumbling blocks.

through. Greek. dia. App-104. Luke 17:1.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then said he unto the disciples, It is impossible but that offences will come: but woe unto him, through whom they come!

Whether this was delivered in continuation of what is recorded in the preceding chapter, it is impossible to say; but probably it came close upon it.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-17.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XVII.

(1) It is impossible but that offences will come.—In this instance, the absence of any apparent connection might, perhaps, justify us in looking on the two precepts as having been noted by St. Luke for their own intrinsic value, without regard to the context in which they had been spoken. (See Notes on Matthew 18:7.) Even here, however, we must remember that there may have been what we have called “dropped links.” It is not hard to see that the self-indulgent life, after the pattern of that of the rich man in the preceding parable, was an “offence” which, in one sense, must needs come, in the history of the Christian Church, as it had come in the Jewish, and yet would bring a woe on the man through whom it came.

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then said he unto the disciples, It is impossible but that offences will come: but woe unto him, through whom they come!
It is
Matthew 16:23; 18:7; Romans 14:13,20,21; 16:17; 1 Corinthians 8:13; 10:32; 11:19; 2 Thessalonians 2:10-12; Revelation 2:14,20; 13:14-18
Reciprocal: Matthew 18:5 - receive;  Matthew 18:6 - offend;  Mark 9:42 - offend;  1 Corinthians 8:9 - take;  1 Timothy 6:1 - that the;  1 John 2:10 - occasion of stumbling

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 17:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-17.html.