Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 18:1

Now He was telling them a parable to show that at all times they ought to pray and not to lose heart,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Constancy;   Despondency;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Prayer;   Thompson Chain Reference - Ask;   Christ;   Church;   Family;   Importunity;   Parables;   Prayer;   Secret Prayer;   Truth;   United Prayer;   Unwise Prayers;   Wicked, the;   The Topic Concordance - Fainting;   Prayer;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Parables;   Prayer;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Parable;   Prayer;   Repetitions;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Luke, gospel of;   Parables;   Prayer;   Widow;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Prayer;   Widow;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Constancy;   Hearing the Word of God;   Heart;   Meditation;   Prayer;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel According to;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Prayer;   Widow;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel of;   Parables;   Prayer;   Vengeance;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Parable;   Prayer;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Character;   Circumstantiality in the Parables;   Communion (2);   Discipline;   Discourse;   Duty;   Energy;   Gospel (2);   Intercession ;   Justice (2);   Luke;   Parable;   Parousia (2);   Personality;   Police;   Prayer (2);   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Syria ;   Vain;   Widow ;   Widows;   Winter ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Agrapha;   End;   Faint;   Gospels, the Synoptic;   Prayer;   Prayers of Jesus;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for June 7;   Every Day Light - Devotion for April 26;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Men ought always to pray - Therefore the plain meaning and moral of the parable are evident; viz. that as afflictions and desolations were coming on the land, and they should have need of much patience and continual fortitude, and the constant influence and protection of the Almighty, therefore they should be instant in prayer. It states, farther, that men should never cease praying for that the necessity of which God has given them to feel, till they receive a full answer to their prayers. No other meaning need be searched for in this parable: St. Luke, who perfectly knew his Master's meaning, has explained it as above.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-18.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

A parable - See the notes at Matthew 13:3.

To this end - To show this.

Always - At all times. That is, we must not neglect regular stated seasons of prayer; we must seize on occasions of remarkable providences as afflictions or signal blessings to seek God in prayer; we must “always” maintain a spirit of prayer, or be in a proper frame to lift up our hearts to God for his blessing, and we must not grow weary though our prayer seems not to be answered.

Not to faint - Not to grow weary or give over. The parable is designed to teach us that, though our prayers should long appear to be unanswered, we should persevere, and not grow weary in supplication to God.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-18.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

The content of this chapter deals with two parables on prayer, that of the unjust judge (Luke 18:1-8), that of the Pharisee and the publican (Luke 18:9-14), bringing children to Jesus (Luke 18:15-17), the account of the rich young ruler (Luke 18:18-30), another prophecy of his Passion (Luke 18:31-34), and the healing of the blind man at Jericho (Luke 18:35-43).

THE PARABLE OF THE UNJUST JUDGE

And he spake a parable unto them to the end that they ought always to pray, and not to faint. (Luke 18:1)

Dummelow listed the lessons from this parable, thus:

(1) The duty of continual prayer; (2) the answer to prayer, persisted in, is certain; (3) in the end, God will maintain the cause of his elect against their adversaries; and (4) a warning against the failure of faith in times of seeming abandonment by God.[1]

And he spake a parable ... is literally, "And he spake also a parable ..."[2] This indicates that this is actually a part of the preceding discourse.

Ought always to pray ... This has no reference to a ceaseless bending of the knee, or a continuation without intermission in the utterance of petitions to the Almighty, but to an attitude of unbroken fellowship with God. As Augustine said, "There is another interior prayer without intermission, and that is the longing of thy heart."[3] It was to this that Paul referred: "Pray without ceasing" (1 Thessalonians 5:17).

And not to faint ... There is a remarkable analogy in this comparison of spiritual failure to physical fainting. Physically, men can faint from shock, disease, hunger, fear, etc.; and for a development of the application to spiritual things, see my Commentary on Hebrews, Hebrews 12:3.

[1] J. R. Dummelow, Commentary on the Holy Bible (New York: The Macmillan Company, 1937), p. 763.

[2] Charles L. Childers, Beacon Bible Commentary (Kansas City, Missouri: Beacon Hill Press, 1964), p. 576.

[3] Quoted by Richard C. Trench, Notes on the Parables of Our Lord (Old Tappan, New Jersey: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1953), p. 485.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-18.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he spoke a parable unto them,.... To his own disciples, as the Ethiopic version reads, in order to encourage them to prayer, with perseverance in it; since such sore times of trial and affliction were coming upon the Jews, of which he had spoken in the preceding chapter; and such times more especially call for prayer; see Psalm 50:15

to this end, that men ought always to pray. This is opposed to them, who pray not at all, or have left off prayer before God, or who pray only in distress; and suggests, that a man should pray as often as he has an opportunity; should be constant and assiduous at the throne of grace, and continue putting up his requests to God, though he does not presently return an answer:

and not to faint; by reason of afflictions, temptations, desertions, and delays in answering prayer; and prayer itself is an admirable antidote against fainting under afflictive providences: it is with the Jews an affirmative precept that a man should pray, בכל יום, "every day"F11Maimon. Hilch. Tephilla, c. 1. sect. 1. ; it was usual with them to pray three times a day; see Psalm 55:17 there is no set time fixed by Christ; men should be always praying. This is not to be understood, that a man should be always actually engaged in the work of prayer; that he should be continually either in his closet, in private devotion to God, or attending exercises of more public prayer, with the saints; for there are other religious exercises to be performed, besides prayer; and besides, there are many civil affairs of life, it is every man's indispensable duty to regard: nor does our Lord mean in the least to break in upon, or interrupt the natural and civil duties of life; but his meaning is, that a man should persevere in prayer, and not leave off, or be dejected, because he has not an immediate answer; and this is clear from the following case.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-18.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And 1 he spake a parable unto them [to this end], that men ought always to pray, and not to a faint;

(1) God will have us to continue in prayer, not to weary us, but to exercise us; therefore we must fight against impatience so that a long delay does not cause us to quit our praying.

(a) Yield to afflictions and adversities as those do who have lost heart.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-18.html. 1599-1645.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

1. And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint;

[And not to faint.] The discourse is continued still; and this parable hath its connexion with chapter 17, concerning Christ's coming to avenge himself upon Jerusalem; which if we keep our eye upon, it may help us to an easier understanding of some more obscure passages that occur in the application of this parable. And to this doth the expression not to faint, seem to have relation; viz. that they might not suffer their hopes and courage to languish and droop, upon the prospect of some afflictions they were likely to grapple with, but that they would give themselves to continual prayer.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-18.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

They ought always to pray. Prayer is a privilege and a duty.

Not to faint. Persistence in prayer is requisite to making it effectual. See Ephesians 6:18. "God reserves for thee that which he is slow to give thee, that thou mayest learn to entertain a supreme desire and longing for it."--{Augustine}.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-18.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

To the end that (προς το δεινpros to dein).

With a view to the being necessary, προςpros and the articular infinitive. The impersonal verb δειdei here is in the infinitive and has another infinitive loosely connected with it προσευχεσταιproseuchesthai to pray.

Not to faint (μη ενκακεινmē enkakein). Literally, not to give in to evil (εν κακεωen κακοςkakeō from kakos bad or evil), to turn coward, lose heart, behave badly. A late verb used several times in the N.T. (2 Corinthians 4:1, 2 Corinthians 4:16, etc.).

sa120

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-18.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

To the end that men ought ( πρὸς τὸ δεῖν )

Lit., with reference to its being necessary always to pray, etc.

Faint ( ἐγκακεῖν )

To turn coward or lose heart.

Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-18.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He spake a parable to them - This and the following parable warn us against two fatal extremes, with regard to prayer: the former against faintness and weariness, the latter against self confidence.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-18.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he spake a parable unto them to the end that they ought always to pray, and not to faint2;
    PARABLE OF THE IMPORTUNATE WIDOW. Luke 18:1-8

  1. And he spoke a parable unto them. The parable resembles that of the friend who came at midnight (Luke 11:5-10), but there the petitioner asked a gift, and here the request is for justice and deliverance.

  2. To the end that they ought always to pray, and not to faint. This parable teaches that the saints must be patient in prayer until the Lord's return.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-18.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

To faint; to be discouraged.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-18.html. 1878.

Scofield's Reference Notes

Wheresoever

See "Armageddon" Revelation 16:14; Revelation 19:17. (See Scofield "Revelation 19:17").

Copyright Statement
These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
Bibliographical Information
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 18:1". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-18.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

‘PRAY, ALWAYS PRAY’

‘Men ought always to pray, and not to faint.’

Luke 18:1

I. The reality of prayer.—God’s mighty men have been men steeped in prayer. There are some in this church who can look back and remember instances when in trouble they have kneeled down to pray, and have known that they have been heard. The burden of responsibility has been lifted from their shoulders, and they have gained peace—the peace which God alone can give.

II. The reflex influence of prayer.—We are to put our trouble into words just as if He did not know anything about it, and while we are telling Him all about it we are telling ourselves that He knows all about it, and the time that we spend in telling Him what He already knows is not badly spent, as one might think. One might call this telling of our trouble the reflex influence which prayer has on us. There are certain things which we cannot tell to our fellow-men; they would not understand us if we did; and there are certain things so secret that we cannot tell them to our neighbour. In telling these things to God we become conscious that there is Someone to sympathise with us, Who knows all about us, and can feel for us. The Christian life should be one long act of prayer. We may live out our days in His presence. We may pray about everything. It is as possible to pray as it is to read, and write, and walk. We often say of a thing that we are thinking of and waiting for, that we are working at it night and day. That does not mean that we never rest, but that we give all our time and thoughts to it; and it is just the same with prayer. ‘Men ought always to pray.’

III. Desire a condition of prayer.—Desire is a condition of prayer—‘Whatever ye desire believe that ye shall receive,’ etc. How many pray and lack desire! How many men come to church and say, ‘Lord, keep me from sin,’ and all the time they are indulging in some besetting sin; who as soon as they go out walk into the temptation; who say, ‘Lord, set my thoughts on things above,’ and all the time they are setting their thoughts on making what they call their ‘pile’! Our prayers will not be efficacious until our desires go with them.

Rev. J. Pullein-Thompson.

Illustration

‘When Martin Luther was wrestling with a man’s sin, he used to say, “I have spent three hours of the day in prayer”; and when Abraham Lincoln was in trouble he said, “I have been driven many times to my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go; my own wisdom and the wisdom of all those around me seemed useless, and so I was driven to prayer.”’

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-18.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint;

Ver. 1. Always to pray and not to faint] Gr. εκκακειν, not shrink back, as sluggards in work or cowards in war. Prayer should be redoubled and reinforced, as those arrows of deliverance, 2 Kings 13:19. The woman of Canaan prays on when denied; and Jacob holds with his hands when his thigh is lamed. He wrestled with slight and might, he raised dust, as the word signifies, and would not away without a blessing. {a} James, surnamed the Just (Christ’s kinsman), had his knees made as hard as camel’s knees with much praying, as Eusebius writes. Father Latimer, during his imprisonment, was so constant and instant in prayer, that often times he was not able to rise off his knees without help. Yea, Paulus Aemilius, being to fight with Perses, king of Macedonia, would not give up sacrificing to his god Hercules, till he saw certain arguments of a victory. As loathing of meat (saith a divine) and painfulness of speaking are two symptoms of a sick body, so irksomeness of praying and carelessness of hearing, of a sick soul.

{a} Etiam post naufragium tentantur maria.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-18.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 18:1. And he spake a parable, &c.— But, [ δε, ] he taught them by a parable, that men ought to persevere in prayer, and not to be discouraged. Heylin. The particle. δε, but, plainly implies, that this parable has a relation to the discourse in the preceding chapter, and was delivered at the same time. The evangelist says it was designed to shew, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint; that is, ought frequently to pray; for so the word παντοτε signifies, John 18:20. The figure is carried still higher in the epithet given to the morning and evening sacrifices; which, because of their frequency, are called, a continual burnt-offering: and, in allusion to this, men are directed to pray without ceasing, 1 Thessalonians 5:17. See on Luke 2:37. It is plain, therefore, that the parable was spoken to recommend continual praying, not in the strict sense of the words, but frequency, earnestness, and perseverance in the duty, not only for blessings on ourselves, but also for blessings on the church of God militant on earth; and being delivered on this occasion, it is designed to inspire the disciples with earnestness and perseverance in their prayers, particularly for the coming of the Son of man, to put an end to the Jewish polity, notwithstanding God should long defer the accomplishment of their desires. The comingof Christ to destroy the Jewish polity, is in this and other passages of scripture, spoken of as a thing exceedingly to be wished for by the disciples in those days; the reason was, the Jews in every country, being their bitter persecutors, were the chief opposers of the Christian religion. Our Lord often in the course of his ministry recommended frequency, earnestness, and perseverance in prayer; not because the Divine Being is tired out by our importunity, but because it is both an expression and exerciseof our firm belief and confidence in his goodness, without which it would not be fit for God to bestow his blessings upon us, nor should we be capable of receiving and using them. See Matthew 7:11. Luke 11:8. The word εκκακειν, rendered to faint, is expressive, and signifies, "to faint under pressures and persecutions,—to yield to evils, and despond under them,—to be so wholly wearied out with them, as to give place to them,—and to cease from prayer as unavailing to procure relief." See Ephesians 3:13. 2 Thessalonians 3:13. Hebrews 12:3.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-18.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

There is no duty in Christianity, the practice of which our Saviour pressed upon us more frequently than this duty of prayer. To encourage his disciples, (and us in them,) to fervency, importunity, and perseverance in this duty, he propounds here the parable of an unjust judge, who was overcome by an importunate widow, to do her justice contrary to his own inclination.

From whence our Saviour argues, that if importunity will prevail with a sinful man, to grant petitions offered to him; how much more prevalent will such importunity be with the infinitely good God, to relieve the necessities of such as devoutly implore his help. And the force of the argument lies thus: "The judge in the parable was an inferior and subordinate judge, was an unrighteous and unjust judge, was a merciless and hard hearted judge; and yet, upon her importunity, he avenged her: how much more will the sovereign and supreme Judge, the holy and righteous, the merciful and compassionate Judge of all the earth, hear and help his praying people, and be the just Avenger of those that fear him"

From the whole note,

1. That prayer, or a liberty of making our requests known to God, is an inestimable favor and privilege. He that considers the nature of God, and the nature of man, cannot question it: God is a being of infinite fullness and perfection; a self- sufficient, and an all-sufficient good; and man an indigent, helpless, dependent creature, full of wants, and obnoxious to dangers.

2. That prayer is not only an inestimable privilege, but an indispensable duty. So solicitous is God for our welfare and happiness, that he makes our privilege our duty, by the authority of his command; so that we are at once ungrateful to God, and unjust to ourselves, in the most exalted degree, if we do not pray unto him, and spread our wants before him.

3. That this duty of prayer is not an occasional, but a constant duty: Men ought always to pray; that is,

1. At all seasonable times and fit opportunities. We are said to do it seasonably; now the seasons for prayer are morning and evening. As the morning and evening sacrifice was constant among the Jews, and the fire was always upon the altar, and never went out; so he that prays morning and evening, may be said to be instant in prayer, and to pray without ceasing.

2. Always to pray, is an endeavor always to keep the heart in a praying frame, and to be very frequent in offering up pious exclamations, and short mental prayers to God, as occasion shall offer; when in the field, in the shop, in the bed, when sleep departs, in the journey when alone. This may be done advantageously without loss of time, and acceptably without danger of hypocrisy, which too often mingles itself with our more set prayers.

Observe, 4. We must not only pray constantly, but pray fervently, yea, importunately; if we would pray successfully, we must cry to God as the widow to the judge: vehemency and importunity are both helps and ornaments to prayer; they both fortify and beautify our prayers; they pierce the heavens, and offer an holy violence to God: Tertullian says, "God delights in such importunity."

Nevertheless, when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth? If by the Son of man's coming we understand Christ's coming in judgment against Jerusalem, then the sense is this; "That when he comes to take vengeance on the obstinate Jews, and to destroy their city, he will find but little faith, and patient waiting for help from God in the land of Judea, and consequently little importuning him with incessant cries and supplications as this poor woman did the unjust judge."

If by the Son of man's coming, we understand Christ's coming to judge the world at the last day, then the sense is, "When he cometh, he will find but few faithful ones, comparatively speaking; he will find but few sincere and serious Christians, in whom the genuine effectws and fruits are found."

Learn, that when Christ shall come to judgment, he will find comparatively very few whose hearts have not fainted, and very many, who through the power that temptation has upon the frailty of human nature are fallen away: When the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth? Verily, but little faith, and few faithful ones.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-18.html. 1700-1703.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

This Chapter contains the Relation of the Importunate Widow, The Parable of the Pharisee and Publican. Children brought to Christ. Our Lord's Discourses; and the History of the Blind Man, near Jericho.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/luke-18.html. 1828.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

1.] πρός, with reference to.

πάντοτε] See 1 Thessalonians 5:17.

The mind of prayer, rather than, though of course including, the outward act, is here intended. The earnest desire of the heart is prayer.

ἐγκακεῖν (= ἐκκακεῖν, re(102).: see note 2 Corinthians 4:1)—to languish,—to give up through the weight of overpowering evil.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-18.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1556

THE DUTY OF PERSEVERING IN PRAYER

Luke 18:1. Men ought always to pray, and not to faint.

THE efficacy of prayer is continually exhibited in the sacred writings, and every incitement to it is afforded us: nevertheless we are prone to faint in the performance of it. To encourage our perseverance in it our Lord delivered a parable. Waving all notice of the parable itself, we shall consider,

I. Our duty—

To be always in the act of prayer would interfere with other duties: that which is here inculcated, implies that we pray,

Statedly—

[Regular seasons for prayer should be fixed. Except in cases of absolute necessity [Note: Matthew 9:13.] they should be adhered to. We should constantly acknowledge God in the public assembly [Note: Hebrews 10:25.]. We should maintain his worship also in our families [Note: Abraham and Joshua were noted for their attention to family religion, Genesis 18:19. Joshua 24:15 : and our Lord’s example is worthy of imitation; he not only expounded his parables to his disciples in private, but prayed with them. See Luke 9:18. which means, “he was at a distance from the multitude, and praying with his disciples.”]; nor should we on any account omit it in our closets [Note: How frequent the stated seasons shall be, must be left to our own discretion; David’s example is good, Psalms 55:17. But as the morning and evening sacrifices were called the continual burnt-offering, so they may be said to pray always, who pray at those returning seasons.].]

Occasionally—

[There are many particular occasions which require us to pray: in prosperity, that God may counteract its evil tendency [Note: Our liturgy teaches us to pray, in all time of our wealth. See Proverbs 30:9.]: in adversity, that we may be supported under it [Note: James 5:13.]: in times of public distress or danger, to avert the calamity [Note: 2 Chronicles 7:14.].]

Habitually—

[We should maintain a spiritual frame of mind. We may have a disposition for prayer in the midst of business; nor will secret ejaculations prevail less than solemn devotions [Note: Compare 2 Samuel 15:31. with 2 Samuel 17:14; 2 Samuel 17:23. See also Nehemiah 2:4; Nehemiah 2:6.].]

To pray thus is our duty; “We ought,” &c.

It is a duty we owe to God

[He, our Creator, Preserver, and Redeemer, has commanded it; nor can any thing absolve us from our obligation to obey.]

We owe it also to our neighbour

[The edification of Christ’s mystical body depends, not only on the union of every part with the head, but on the whole being fitly framed together, and on every joint supplying its proper nourishment [Note: Ephesians 4:16. Colossians 2:19.]. But if we be remiss in prayer, we shall be incapable of administering that benefit, which other members have a right to expect from us [Note: Samuel had a deep conviction of this truth; 1 Samuel 12:23.].]

We owe it to ourselves

[A “spirit of supplication” is as necessary to the soul, as food to the body; nor can we feel any regard for our souls, if we do not cultivate it.]

It is, however, by no means easy to fulfil this duty—

II. The difficulties that attend it—

When we set ourselves to the performance of it, we shall find difficulties—

Before we begin to pray—

[ Worldly business may occupy, or worldly amusements dissipate, our thoughts. Family cares may distract our minds, and family disagreements indispose us for this holy employment [Note: 1 Peter 3:7.]. Lassitude of body may unfit us for the necessary exertions. We may be disabled by an invincible hardness of heart. A want of utterance may also operate as a heavy discouragement. By these means many are tempted to defer their religious exercises: but to yield to the temptation is to increase the difficulty.]

While we are engaged in prayer—

[The world is never more troublesome than at such seasons. Something seen or heard, lost or gained, done or to be done, will generally obtrude itself upon us when we are at the throne of grace. The flesh also, with its vilest imaginations, will solicit our attention; nor will Satan be backward to interrupt our devotions [Note: He has various devices whereby he strives to accomplish his purpose. He will suggest “it is needless to pray:” or, “it is presumption for so great a sinner to ask any thing of God:” or, “it is hypocrisy to ask, when the heart is so little engaged.” Sometimes he will inject into the Christian’s mind the most blasphemous and horrid thoughts; and at other times tempt him to admire his own fluency and enlargement in prayer. Such are the “fiery darts” with which he often assails the soul, Ephesians 6:16.].]

After we have concluded prayer—

[When we have prayed, we should expect an answer. But worldliness may again induce a forgetfulness of God; and a habit of worldly conversation drive every serious thought from our minds. Impatience to receive the desired blessings may deject us. Ignorance of the method in which God answers prayer may cause us to disquiet ourselves with many ungrounded apprehensions. Unbelief may rob us of the benefits we might have received [Note: James 1:6-7.]. Whatever obstructs God’s answers to prayer, disqualifies us for the future discharge of that duty.]

Application—

[Let us not expect victory without many conflicts. Let us remember the effect of perseverance in the case of Moses [Note: Exodus 17:11-13.]. Above all, let us attend to the parable spoken for this end [Note: Luke 18:2-8.]. So shall we be kept from fainting under our discouragements, and God will fulfil to us his own promise [Note: Galatians 6:9.] —]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/luke-18.html. 1832.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 18:1. What Jesus has hitherto said of His Parousia was of such weighty and everlastingly decisive concern for His disciples, that it was calculated to stimulate them to unremitting prayer, that they might become partakers of the ἐκδίκησις which the Parousia was to bring to them (Luke 18:7). Hence (without the omission of any intervening dialogue, Schleiermacher, Olshausen) now follows the parable of the widow and the unjust judge, peculiar to Luke, and its application (Luke 18:1-8). This parable is no addition inserted without a motive (Köstlin, Holtzmann), nor is it taken from the Logia; but it comes from the source of the account of the journey. Weizsäcker alleges that it must have been a later growth, annexed by Luke to his source of the narrative of the journey; that the judge is the heathen magistracy; the widow, the church bereaved after the departure of Christ; her adversary, the hostile Judaism. Here also (comp. on Luke 15:11, Luke 16:1; Luke 16:19) is a transferring of later relations to an early period without sufficient reason.

πρός] in reference to.

πάντοτε] It is not the continual disposition of prayer (“as the breath of the inner man,” Olshausen) that is meant, but the constant actual prayer, in respect of which, however, πάντοτε is not to be pressed, but to be taken in a popularly hyperbolical sense. Comp. Luke 18:7; 1 Thessalonians 1:10.

ἐκκακεῖν] to become discouraged, not: in their vocation (Schleiermacher), but, according to the context: in their prayers. As to the form ἐκκ., for which Lachm. has ἐγκ. (and Tischendorf: ἐνκ.), which, although here preponderatingly attested, is to be regarded as an improvement, see on 2 Corinthians 4:1.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-18.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 18:1. δὲ καὶ, moreover also) as regards the preparation for those things about to come to pass. Comp. Luke 18:8.— πρὸς τὸ) that is to say, as concerns that all-important subject, prayer.— πάντοτε, always) night and day; Luke 18:7.— προσεύχεσθαι, to pray) Two parables treat of prayer: the one here, in Luke 18:1, et seqq.; and the second in Luke 18:9, et seqq. The first teaches us to unlearn (overcome, lay aside) indolent faintness; the second, to unlearn confidence in ourselves: two extremes deserving to be noted. For the words, ἐγκακεῖν, to be faint or indolent, and πεποιθότας ἐφʼ ἑαυτοῖς, i.e. self-confidence, in a bad sense, are mutually opposed, Luke 18:1; Luke 18:9; even as confidence or trust, in a good sense, 2 Corinthians 3:4 ( πεποίθησιν ἔχομεν διὰ τοῦ χριστοῦ πρὸς τὸν θεόν), and to faint, 2 Corinthians 4:1 ( οὐκ ἐγκακοῦμεν), Eph. 3 12, 13, are mutually opposed.— μὴ ἐγκακεῖν,(195) not to faint) The cry of the elect ( τῶν βοώντων), Luke 18:7, is in consonance with this not-fainting. An example in point occurs, Luke 18:39 [the blind man near Jericho].

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-18.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

LUKE CHAPTER 18

Luke 18:1-8 The parable of the unjust judge and the importunate widow.

Luke 18:9-14 The parable of the Pharisee and publican.

Luke 18:15-17 Christ’s tenderness to the little children that were

brought unto him.

Luke 18:18-23 He teacheth a ruler how to attain eternal life.

Luke 18:24-27 He showeth how hard it is for the rich to enter into

the kingdom of God,

Luke 18:28-30 promises rewards to those who have foregone aught

for the gospel’s sake,

Luke 18:31-34 foretells his own death and resurrection,

Luke 18:35-43 and giveth sight to a blind man.

This duty of praying always is inculcated to us several times in the Epistles, as may appear from those texts quoted in the margin, which we must not interpret as an obligation upon us to be always upon our knees praying; for thus our obedience to it would be inconsistent with our obedience to other precepts of God, relating both to religious duties and civil actions, neither was Christ himself always praying: but it either, first, lets us know, that there is no time in which we may not pray; as we may pray in all places, every where lifting up holy hands without doubting, ( as the apostle saith, 1 1 Timothy 2:8), so we must pray at any time. Or, secondly, it is as much as, pray frequently and ordinarily; as Solomon’s servants are said by the queen of Sheba to stand always, that is, ordinarily and frequently, before him, 1 Kings 10:8; and the Jews are said always to have resisted the Spirit of God, Acts 7:51; that is, very often, for they did it not in every individual act of their lives. Or else, in every part of time; knitting the morning and evening (the general parts of our time) together by prayer. Thus the morning and evening sacrifice is called the continual burnt offering, Exodus 29:42 Nehemiah 10:33. Or, as it is in Ephesians 6:18, en panti cairw, in every season, whenever the providence of God offers us a fair season and opportunity for prayer. Or mentally praying always, intermixing good and pious ejaculations with our most earthly and sublunary occasions. Or, having our hearts at all times ready for prayer, having the fire always on the altar, (as was required under the old law), though the sacrifice be not always offering.

And not to faint, which is the same with that, Ephesians 6:18, watching thereunto with all perseverance; and Colossians 4:2, Continue in prayer, and watch in the same. Not fainting either by reason of God’s delay to give us the things we ask of him, or through laziness, and remission of our duty, before our life doth determine. This is now what our Saviour designs to teach us in this parable which followeth.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 18:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-18.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

всегда молиться Обычная тема в посланиях Павла (см. во Введении: Проблемы толкования). Ср. Рим. 1:9; 12:12; Еф. 6:18; 1Фес. 5:17; 2Фес. 1:11.

не унывать Наставление в свете жизненных скорбей, трудностей и признаков приближающегося суда (описанного в предыдущей беседе).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-18.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Always; habitually, perservingly.

Not to faith; not to be discouraged, or cease to pray. No man fulfils his obligations to God or to himself who is not in the habit of daily prayer, and who is not sincere in his supplications for himself and his fellow-men.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-18.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And he spoke a parable to them to the end that they ought always to pray, and not to faint,’

This parable is so important that an explanation of its meaning and significance is given at its commencement. It is given as an encouragement and incentive to pray, and to go on praying without wilting. And as with the Lord’s prayer, the prayer is to be concerning the going forward of God’s purposes. It is to be always with an eye on the coming of the Son of Man. The prayer is to be that God will act on behalf of His people, will watch over them, will vindicate them (‘hallowed be Your name’), and will bring them through safely believing until the end (‘lead us not into testing’). Jesus’ final question in 8b is not really an expression of doubt, but an encouragement to faith.

‘Always to pray.’ Compare Paul’s ‘pray without ceasing’ (1 Thessalonians 5:17). This is a reminder that our lives should be firmly based on having fellowship with Him in prayer, and on an attitude of constant prayerful trust as we live our lives day by day, emphasising especially the need for God’s people to come together regularly to pray. From it we recognise the importance that Jesus placed on constant communion with God, and on praying regularly concerning the things of God.

Sadly a lot of Christians see prayer as coming with a shopping list to God and then saying, ‘Gimme, gimme, gimme (give to me)’, or as a noble attempt to keep all their relatives well. But neither of these are seen to be what should be the Christian’s prime concern. For as we saw in Luke 11:1-4 Jesus said that our main emphasis in prayer should be on the carrying forward of His will, and the establishment of His Kingly Rule. It should only be children who spend all their time talking about themselves.

In context the emphasis is on praying continuingly until the second coming of Jesus Christ in view of the constraints that will be on His people. His people should be concerned in one long chain of prayer that never ceases, in which all of us should continuingly partake, and should be centred on the fulfilment of His purposes, for this will play an important part in His purposes coming about.

The conflict between this attitude and that of the Jews is striking. They prayed formally three times a day, and limited it to that lest God get sick of them, but this goes far beyond that. This was looking for prayer to become the very breath of life. It was an indication that God looks for our companionship continually.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-18.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

1.Unto them—Unto his disciples. Though it was doubtless later in their journey toward the Jordan than the discourse of the coming of the Son of man in the last chapter, yet the impress of that discourse is upon the mind, and the same solemn topic tinges the present parable.

Always to pray—The habit of earnest vocal devotion, public, family, and private, will in due time impregnate the Christian soul with prayer. The human spirit thus attains the temper in which it spontaneously breathes prayer.

And not to faint—Not faint through weariness of the long well doing. It is a sad thing when prayer grows silent on the lips, and faint in the heart. For since prayer is the vital breath of the Christian, without it the Christian life ceases, and the man is spiritually dead.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-18.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The audience for this parable was the disciples ( Luke 17:22). Luke identified Jesus" reason for giving it clearly. He wanted to encourage them to continue praying and not to grow discouraged. The reference to "all times" or "always" (not continuously, but in all circumstances) indicates that the interval between Jesus" present ministry and His future return is in view ( Luke 17:22-37; cf. Luke 18:8). This was, then, instruction concerning what the disciples should do in the inter-advent period in view of Jesus" second coming. When He returns, Jesus will balance the scales of justice. In the meantime disciples need to continue expressing their faith in God by requesting His grace.

"Jesus" teaching goes beyond that of the Jews, who tended to limit the times of prayer lest they weary God. Three times a day (on the model of Daniel 6:10) was accepted as the maximum." [Note: Morris, p262.]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-18.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 18:1. Unto them, i.e., the disciples.

To this end, not in order that, but to show, that they (the disciples) ought always to pray. Comp. 1 Thessalonians 5:17 : ‘Pray without ceasing.’ The latter refers to the believer’s prevailing frame of mind; this, to unwearied petition for the same object believed to be in accordance with God’s will. It shows the conflict of prayer in the distressed and suffering disciple.

Not to faint, not to be discouraged. The danger of discouragement arises from the delay in receiving an answer, while the ‘adversary’ continues to harass.’

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-18.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 18:1. : the story is a parable in so far as it teaches by an incident in natural life the power of perseverance with reference to the spiritual life.— , in reference to, indicating the subject or aim of the parable—de (so Kypke, with examples).— : not continuously, but persistently in spite of temptation to cease praying through delayed answer = keep praying, notwithstanding delay. The whole raison d’être of the parable is the existence of such delay. Some fail to see this and think that the difference between God and the judge is that He does not delay. It is not so. God is like the judge in this, only His delay has not the same cause or motive. The judge represents God as He appears in Providence to tried faith— : a Pauline word (Galatians 6:9; 2 Thessalonians 3:13, etc.). This introduction to the parable is probably due to Lk., who, it will be observed, takes care to make the lesson of general application, though the after and the concluding reflection in Luke 18:8 imply that the special subject of prayer contemplated both by Lk. and by our Lord was the advent referred to in the previous context.

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-18.html. 1897-1910.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Luke 18:1. And he spake, &c. — ελεγε δε και παραβολην αυτοις. He also spake a parable to them. The particle δε, here used, plainly implies, that this parable has a relation to the preceding discourse, of which indeed it is a continuation, but which is improperly interrupted by the division of the chapters. There is in it, and in the following parable, a particular reference to the distress and trouble they were soon to meet with from their persecutors, which would render the duties of prayer, patience, and perseverance peculiarly seasonable. That men ought always to pray — At all times, on all occasions, or frequently, (as the word παντοτε, here rendered always, signifies, John 18:20,) and not to faint — Under their trials, not to despond, or yield to evils, as εκκακειν, here used, signifies, so as to be wearied out by them, and cease from prayer, as unavailing to procure relief. It frequently happens, that after men have prayed for any particular blessing, they desist, because God does not immediately grant them their petition. To show the evil of this, and to recommend importunity and perseverance in prayer especially when we are in pursuit of any spiritual mercy or mercies, relating either to ourselves, our friends, or the church of God, the present parable is introduced. As delivered on this occasion, it seems to have been principally designed to inspire the disciples with earnestness and perseverance in their prayers for the coming of the Son of man to destroy the Jewish constitution, notwithstanding God should long defer the accomplishment of their desire. For this event is represented, not only here, but in several other passages of Scripture, as a thing exceedingly to be wished for in those days. The reason was, the Jews in every country were their bitterest persecutors, and the chief opposers of Christianity. See Luke 21:28; Hebrews 10:25; James 5:7; 1 Peter 4:7. Independent of this, however, in the course of his ministry, our Lord often recommended frequency, earnestness, and perseverance in prayer, not because God is, or can be, ever tired out with our importunity; but because it is both an expression and exercise of our firm belief of, and confidence in, his power and goodness, without which it would not be fit for God to bestow his blessings upon us, nor would we be capable of receiving and using them. See on Matthew 7:7-11; Luke 11:5-8. Of continual praying, see on 1 Thessalonians 5:17.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/luke-18.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Always to pray, i.e. to pray daily, and frequently; (Witham) and also to walk always in the presence of God, by a spirit of prayer, love, and sorrow for sin.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-18.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

a parable. Both parables peculiar to Luke. Only here that the explanation is put first.

to this end, &c. Greek. pros (App-104.) to dein = to the purport that it is necessary, &c.

always. Figure of speech Synecdoche (of Genus), App-6. = on alloccasions. perseveringly.

pray. Greek. proseuchomai. App-134.

not. Greek. me. App-105.

to faint = to lose heart, be discouraged, give in, or give up. Greek. egkakeo.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-18.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint;

This delightful parable was evidently designed to follow up the subject of the last section, on the Coming of the Son of man (Luke 18:8). In so far as the closing verses directed the thoughts to the Second Personal Appearing of the Lord Jesus, it was as an event which would occur when least expected. But lest this should lead-as it has led-to the inference that it would be very speedy, or was quite near at hand, the more immediate design of this parable was to guard against that impression, by intimating that it might, on the contrary, be so long delayed as nearly to extinguish the expectation of His coming at all. Accordingly, while the duty of persevering prayer in general is here enforced, the more direct subject of the parable is unceasing prayer by the widowed and oppressed Church for redress of all its wrongs, for deliverance out of all its troubles for transition from its widowhood to its wedded state, by the glorious appearing of its heavenly Bridegroom.

And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray. Compare Luke 18:7, "His own elect which cry unto Him day and night."

And not to faint, [ ekkakein (Greek #1573), or, as the better supported reading, perhaps, is, engkakein (G1457a)] - 'and not to lose heart,' or 'slacken.'

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-18.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

1. To teach them that they should always pray. Prayer is a right, not a duty. And never become discouraged. God knows our needs, much better than we do. But he wants us to ask him and to praise him, just as we want our children to talk to us. See Ephesians 6:18.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-18.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

XVIII.

(1) That men ought always to pray, and not to faint.—The latter of the two verbs is noticeable as being used in the New Testament by St. Luke and St. Paul only (2 Corinthians 4:1; 2 Corinthians 4:16; Galatians 6:9; 2 Thessalonians 3:13). The whole verse is remarkable as being one of the few instances (Luke 18:9 being another) in which a parable is introduced by a distinct statement as to its drift and aim.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-18.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he spake a parable unto them to this end, that men ought always to pray, and not to faint;
that
11:5-8; 21:36; Genesis 32:9-12,24-26; Job 27:8-10; Psalms 55:16,17; 65:2; Psalms 86:3; *marg:; Psalms 102:17; 142:5-7; Jeremiah 29:12; Romans 12:12; Ephesians 6:18; Philippians 4:6; Colossians 4:2,12; 1 Thessalonians 5:17
and not
Psalms 27:13; Jonah 2:7; Galatians 6:9; Hebrews 12:3-5
Reciprocal: Genesis 18:27 - I have;  Genesis 18:31 - GeneralGenesis 32:26 - I will not;  Exodus 17:11 - GeneralDeuteronomy 9:14 - Let me;  1 Samuel 1:12 - continued praying;  1 Kings 8:28 - Yet have thou;  1 Kings 18:43 - Go up;  2 Kings 6:33 - wait for the;  2 Chronicles 6:19 - Have respect;  Job 15:4 - restrainest;  Job 27:10 - will he always;  Psalm 27:4 - seek;  Psalm 80:4 - how long;  Psalm 116:2 - therefore;  Psalm 123:2 - so our eyes;  Isaiah 40:31 - not faint;  Isaiah 62:6 - keep;  Daniel 6:20 - servest;  Joel 1:19 - to thee;  Matthew 6:5 - when;  Matthew 7:7 - and it;  Matthew 15:25 - came;  Matthew 20:31 - but they cried;  Matthew 26:44 - prayed;  Mark 10:48 - but;  Mark 11:24 - What;  Mark 14:39 - he went;  Luke 11:8 - because of;  Luke 11:10 - GeneralLuke 18:39 - but;  Acts 1:14 - all;  Acts 10:2 - and prayed;  Acts 12:5 - prayer was made without ceasing;  Romans 1:9 - that;  2 Thessalonians 3:13 - be not weary;  1 Timothy 5:5 - continueth;  James 5:16 - The effectual;  Revelation 2:3 - hast not;  Revelation 13:10 - Here

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-18.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

We know that perseverance in prayer is a rare and difficult attainment; and it is a manifestation of our unbelief that, when our first prayers are not successful, we immediately throw away not only hope, but all the ardor of prayer. But it is an undoubted evidence of our Faith, if we are disappointed of our wish, and yet do not lose courage. Most properly, therefore, does Christ recommend to his disciples to persevere in praying.

The parable which he employs, though apparently harsh, was admirably fitted to instruct his disciples, that they ought to be importunate in their prayers to God the Father, till they at length draw from him what He would otherwise appear to be unwilling to give. Not that by our prayers we gain a victory over God, and bend him slowly and reluctantly to compassion, but because the actual facts do not all at once make it evident that he graciously listens to our prayers. In the parable Christ describes to us a widow, who obtained what she wanted from an unjust and cruel judge, because she did not cease to make earnest demands. The leading truth conveyed is, that God does not all at once grant assistance to his people, because he chooses to be, as it were, wearied out by prayers; and that, however wretched and despicable may be the condition of those who pray to him, yet if they do not desist from the uninterrupted exercise of prayer, he will at length regard them and relieve their necessities.

The parties between whom the comparison is drawn are, indeed, by no means equal; for there is a wide difference between a wicked and cruel man and God, who is naturally inclined to mercy. But Christ intended to assure believers that they have no reason to fear lest their persevering entreaties to the Father of mercy should be refused, since by importunate supplication they prevail on men who are given to cruelty. The wicked and iron-hearted judge could not avoid yielding at length, though reluctantly, to the earnest solicitations of the widow: how then shall the prayers of believers, when perseveringly maintained, be without effect? If exhaustion and weakness are felt by us when we give way after a slight exertion, or if the ardor of prayer languishes because God appears to lend a deaf ear, let us rest assured of our ultimate success, though it may not be immediately apparent. Entertaining this conviction, let us contend against our impatience, so that the long delay may not induce us to discontinue our prayers.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 18:1". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-18.html. 1840-57.