Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 21:34

"Be on guard, so that your hearts will not be weighted down with dissipation and drunkenness and the worries of life, and that day will not come on you suddenly like a trap;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Care;   Hardening, Hardness of Heart;   Judgment, Day of;   Watchfulness;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Knowledge of God (1);   Temperance;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Wine;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Luke, the Gospel According to;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Drunkenness;   Luke, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kingdom of God;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Care ;   Day;   Day (That);   Discourse;   Drunkenness;   Drunkenness (2);   Endurance;   Heart;   Indolence;   Luke, Gospel According to;   Pleasure;   Readiness;   Supremacy;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Care;   Drunkenness;   Eschatology of the New Testament;   Hap;   Hunting;   Overcharge;   Snare;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for August 27;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Take heed to yourselves - See our Lord's parable, relative to this matter, explained, Mark 13:34; (note).

Be overcharged - Literally, be made heavy, as is generally the case with those who have eaten or drank too much. Take heed that ye be not rendered secure by an improper use of lawful things: do not make this earth your portion: expect its dissolution, and prepare to meet your God.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-21.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

But take heed to yourselves, lest haply your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting, and drunkenness, and cares of this life, and that day come on you suddenly as a snare: for so shall it come upon all them that dwell upon the face of the earth. But watch ye at every season, making supplication, that ye may prevail to escape all these things that shall come to pass, and to stand before the Son of man.

Take heed to yourselves ... means that men should give more attention to their own spiritual condition than to such questions as the apostles just raised. The vital thing that concerns every person ever born is his relationship to God in Christ; and, as that is the practical concern of greatest importance, Jesus concluded this teaching with this appeal for patient, godly living on the part of his followers.

With surfeiting, drunkenness, and cares of this life ... Ash observed that the word for "surfeiting" "refers to the nausea following a debauch and is used only here in the New Testament."[37] It is translated "dissipation" in RSV, Phillips, and New English Bible. It is noteworthy that "cares of this life" appear here as equally detrimental in some as gross sins are in others.

Suddenly as a snare ... Jesus here stated that the Second Coming will thus come upon "all" that dwell on the face of "all the earth." Thus, none shall expect him at the time of his coming, which appears to give a negative answer to the question he propounded in Luke 18:8.

Watch ye, that ye may escape ... In the TYPE of the final event, the Christians escaped the siege through heeding Jesus' words; the admonition here is that if his disciples watch they shall escape the disasters accompanying the ANTI-TYPE. There is reference to this escape in 1 Thessalonians 4:16-18.

To stand before the Son of man ... These words foretell of glorious majesty pertaining to Jesus Christ in the final judgment. The disciples were either standing or sitting with Jesus when these words were uttered, and they found no discomfort whatever in his presence; but the scene here transferred to the Great Assize, "when the great and terrible day of the Lord has come, and who shall be able to stand!" (2 Corinthians 5:10; Revelation 6:17).

ENDNOTE:

[37] Anthony Lee Ash, op. cit., p. 118.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-21.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And take heed to yourselves,.... To your souls and bodies, to your lives and conversations; be upon your watch and guard:

lest your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting and drunkenness; with excessive eating and drinking; for these, as they oppress and burden the stomach, and disorder the body, so they stupefy the senses, and make the mind dull and heavy, and unfit for spiritual and religious exercises; such as reading, meditation, and prayer:

and cares of this life; concealing food and clothing, what you shall eat or drink, or wherewith ye shall be clothed; all such anxious and worldly cares, being that to the soul, as intemperance is to the body; for there is such a thing as being inebriated with the world, as well as with wine:

and so that day come upon you unawares; the day of Jerusalem's destruction; and this suggests, that such would be the carnality and security of some persons, and so they would be surprised with ruin at once; see Luke 17:26.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-21.html. 1999.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Lest haply your hearts be overcharged (μη ποτε βαρητωσιν αι καρδιαι υμωνmē pote barēthōsin hai kardiai humōn). First aorist passive subjunctive of βαρεωbareō an old verb to weigh down, depress, with μη ποτεmē pote surfeiting (εν κρεπαληιen krepalēi). A rather late word, common in medical writers for the nausea that follows a debauch. Latin crapula, the giddiness caused by too much wine. Here only in the N.T.

Drunkenness (μετηιmethēi). From μετυmethu (wine). Old word but in the N.T. only here and Romans 13:13; Galatians 5:21.

Cares of this life (μεριμναις βιωτικαιςmerimnais biōtikais). Anxieties of life. The adjective βιωτικοςbiōtikos is late and in the N.T. only here and 1 Corinthians 6:3.

Come on you (επιστηιepistēi). Second aorist active subjunctive of επιστημιephistēmi ingressive aorist. Construed also with μη ποτεmē pote (επνιδιοςephnidios). Adjective in predicate agreeing with ημεραhēmera (day).

As a snare (ως παγιςhōs pagis). Old word from πηγνυμιpēgnumi to make fast a net or trap. Paul uses it several times of the devil‘s snares for preachers (1 Timothy 3:7; 2 Timothy 2:26).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-21.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Overcharged ( βαρηζῶσιν )

Weighed down. Compare Luke 9:32; 2 Corinthians 5:4.

Surfeiting ( κραιπάλῃ )

Only here in New Testament. Derivation uncertain: akin to the Latin crapula,intoxication. Trench finds an equivalent in fulsomeness, in its original sense offulness. In the medical writings it is used of drunken nausea or headache.

Drunkenness ( μέθῃ )

Compare are well drunk, John 2:10. This and kindred words in the New Testament always refer to intoxication, or that which intoxicates. See note on John 2:10.

Cares ( μερίμναις )

See on Matthew 6:25.

Of this life ( βιωτικαῖς )

The rendering is too general; though it might be difficult to give a better. Βίος , life, means life considered either as to its duration (1 Peter 4:3); the means of support (Mark 12:44; Luke 8:43; Luke 21:4; 1 John 3:17); or the manner of leading it (1 Timothy 2:2). The meaning here is pertaining to the support or luxury of life; and so in the only other passages where it occurs, 1 Corinthians 6:3, 1 Corinthians 6:4. The parallel is Matthew 6:31. Wyc., business of this life.

Suddenly ( αἰφνίδιος )

Only here and 1 Thessalonians 5:3.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-21.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And take heed to yourselves, lest at any time your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting, and drunkenness, and cares of this life, and so that day come upon you unawares.

Take heed, lest at any time your hearts be overloaded with gluttony and drunkenness — And was there need to warn the apostles themselves against such sins as these? Then surely there is reason to warn even strong Christians against the very grossest sins. Neither are we wise, if we think ourselves out of the reach of any sin: and so that day - Of judgment or of death, come upon you, even you that are not of this world-Unawares. Matthew 24:42; Mark 13:33; Luke 12:35.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-21.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Verily I say unto you, This generation shall not pass away, till all things be accomplished1.

  1. This generation shall not pass away, till all things be accomplished. See .

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-21.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

34 And take heed to yourselves, lest at any time your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting, and drunkenness, and cares of this life, and so that day come upon you unawares.

Ver. 34. Take heed that your hearts] The disciples themselves had in them the common poison of nature, and so were obnoxious even to the most reproachful evils. That, πανσπερμια, if watered with the temptation of Satan, what sin may it not produce in the best, unless God prevent? Let the best take heed that they be not irregulares gulares, making the corpse a cloak bag, the gut a gulf, &c. A full belly makes a foul heart: the rankest weeds grow out of the fattest soil.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-21.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 21:34. Your hearts be overcharged The word βαρυνθωσιν property signifies, burdened, or pressed down; and elegantly and strongly expresses the hateful consequences of intemperance; and the load that it brings on those rational faculties which peculiarly distinguish us from the beasts of the field. See Horat. Sat. 2: lib. 2: line 77. The reader will observe that St. Luke's account of this discourse is very short, in comparison with that of St. Matthew and St. Mark; for the obvious reason, that he had given the chief heads of it before, partly in a discourse of our Lord's last coming, which was delivered to a very numerous assembly in Galilee, (ch. Luke 12:35, &c.) and partly in another discourse, relating only to the destruction of Jerusalem, which was delivered in his journey thither at the feast of dedication, ch. Luke 17:20, &c. Here therefore he chooses to omit what had been inserted upon those occasions; as St. John, who probably wrote after the accomplishment of this prophesy, entirely omits it; and certainly, considering the circumstance of time, it came with infinitely greater strength from the other evangelists, than it could afterwards have done from him. See on Luke 21:11.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-21.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Here our Lord cautions his disciples against such a distemper and indisposition of mind, as may render them unfit and unready for his coming and appearance; and to take heed of two dangerous sins, namely, voluptousness and earthly-mindedness, which above any other sins will indispose us for the duty of watchfulness. There is a three-fold reason why our Saviour forewarns us of these sins, with reference to the day of judgment;

1. Because there are certain prognostics of the day of judgment approaching; As it was in the days of Noah, so shall the coming of the Son of man be.

2. Because there are certain prognostics of the day of judgment approaching, they do not only foretell, but hasten the coming of Christ, to see the world drowned in voluptousness and earthly-mindedness, in security and sensuality, is not only a sign to foretell, but a sin that hastens judgment, and pulls down vengeance upon a wicked world.

3. Christ bids us beware of these sins with reference to the day of judgment, because these sins are derisoria judicia, they beget in men a profane spirit of scoffing and deriding at the notices of Christ's appearing to judgment. In the last days there shall come scoffers, walking after their own lusts, and saying, Where is the promise of his coming? 2 Peter 3:3-4

Our Saviour having thus warned them of these sins, he next exhorts them to watchfulness; Watch ye, therefore, for as a snare that day will come upon you; that is, very suddenly, and very unexpectedly: a snare has a threefold property, to catch suddenly, to hold sure, to destroy certainly. Our Lord's coming to Jerusalem was very unexpected, and his coming to us by death and judgment will steal upon us if we are not watchful.

Watch ye then, for our Lord will come; at what hour he will come cannot certainly be known; there is no time in which we can promise or assure ourselves, that our Lord will not come; the time of our whole life is little enough to prepare for his coming. Our preparation for, will be no acceleration or hastening of, our Lord's coming. And oh, how dreadful will his coming be, if we be found off our watch, and altogether unready for his appearance: appear we must in judgment, but shall not be able to stand in the judgment; see Christ we shall as a judge, but not behold him as a redeemer.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-21.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

34.] ἑαυτοῖς and ὑμῶν are emphatic, recalling the thoughts to themselves, after the recounting of these outward signs.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-21.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 21:34. ΄ήποτε βαρηθῶσιν, lest at any time your hearts be weighed down [“be overcharged”]) βάρος expresses drowsy torpor: Matthew 26:43.— ἐν κραιπάλῃ καὶ μέθῃ, with surfeiting and drunkenness) κραιπάλη is the headache and sickness which the previous day’s drunkenness entails.(229)΄ερί΄ναις βιωτικαῖς, the cares of life) in planting, purchasing costly garments, gardens, houses, etc.: ch. Luke 17:27-28 [As in the days of Noah, and those of Lot].— αἰφνίδιος) sudden, unexpected, unforeseen. The same epithet occurs in 1 Thessalonians 5:3 [“When they shall say, Peace and safety, then sudden destruction cometh upon them, as travail upon a woman with child”]. Refer to this the, for, in Luke 21:35.— ἐφʼ ὑμᾶς, upon you) To these are opposed all the rest of the world, who are mere dwellers on the earth [ τοὺς καθημένους ἐπὶ πρόσωπον πάσης τῆς γῆς]. The character of the latter is expressed in ch. Luke 17:27-28.— ἐκείνη, that) the last day. In antithesis to αὕτη, this generation, Luke 21:32. The universality of its visitation is in consonance with this view. See Luke 21:35.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-21.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 34-36. I take the Luke 21:34 to be a good exposition of the term watch, Luke 21:36. Avoid sin industriously, in a prospect of my coming to judgment: for sin is compared to sleep, Romans 13:11 Ephesians 5:14; and as he that watcheth doth not only wake, but setteth himself designedly to forbear sleep, in order to some end; so he who keepeth the spiritual watch must set himself designedly to avoid sin, upon a prospect of Christ’s coming, and the uncertainty of it. Particularly he cautions his disciples against luxury and worldly mindedness. The first he expresses under the notions of gluttony and drunkenness, which are two eminent species of it.

The latter, under the notion of the cares of this life; not necessary and provident cares, but superfluous and distracting cares. These things he presseth them to avoid, lest they should be surprised by Christ’s coming, as he tells them the most of the world would be.

He further exhorteth them to pray always; the sense of which precept we showed largely in our notes on Luke 18:1.

He further presseth both these duties in those words,

That ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass; those that should come to pass at or before the destruction of Jerusalem, or afterward;

and to stand before the Son of man, that is, in the last judgment; for, The ungodly shall not stand in the judgment, nor sinners in the congregation of the righteous, Psalms 1:5.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 21:34". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-21.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

день тот Т.е. день Его возвращения. См. пояснения к Мф. 24:37. Когда Христос упоминает о Своем Втором пришествии, Он неизменно требует бодрствования (ср. 12:37-40; Мф. 25:13; Мк. 13:33-37).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-21.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Be overcharged with surfeiting; made heavy and careless by immoderate eating and drinking.

That day; the day when Christ will come to save his people and take vengeance on his foes. These exhortations were applicable to the day of which he had been speaking, to the day of death, and to the day of judgment. Excessive eating and drinking tend not only to produce various bodily diseases, but to blind the mind, stupefy the conscience, and corrupt the heart. Christians should not indulge in these sins, which unfit them for the discharge of their duty, and prevent their being prepared for the coming of Christ.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-21.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 21:34. To yourselves. Emphatic.

Overcharged. Made heavy, sleepy, and hence unexpectant, the underlying thought being the sudden return of the Lord. Three things are mentioned as bringing them into such a state.

Surfeiting, heaviness and dizziness such as drunkenness of yesterday gives; drunkenness, which makes them for today unfit to reflect maturely upon their highest interests; cares of this life, which plague them for tomorrow (Van Oosterzee). These are not to be taken figuratively, but as representing three classes of dangers. Things relatively lawful are here included, because they may be used so unwisely as to deprive Christians of a watchful spirit.

Suddenly as a snare. The phrase, ‘as a snare,’ should probably be connected with Luke 21:34. ‘That day’ would certainly come ‘suddenly,’ but if they were ‘overcharged’ with other matters, it would come ‘as a snare.’ The figure is that of throwing of a net or noose, over wild animals. There is a thought of ruinous consequences as well as of suddenness.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-21.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

hearts. Put by Figure of speech Synecdoche (of the Part), App-6, for the whole person.

overcharged = weighed down. Greek. baruno. Only here. Compare Luke 9:32. 2 Corinthians 5:4.

surfeiting. Greek. kraipale. A medical word used for the nausea after drunkenness, from which is the Latin crapula. Occurs only here. The English is from the Old French surfait or sorfait = excess.

drunkenness. Greek. methe. Occurs only here, Romans 13:13. Galatians 1:5, Galatians 1:21.

cares. See note on Matthew 6:25, "drunkenness "of to-day; "cares" for tomorrow.

of this life. Greek. biotikos = of or belonging to bios. App-170.

come = should come.

upon. Greek. epi. App-104.

unawares = suddenly. Greek. aiphnidios. Occurs only here, and 1 Thessalonians 5:3.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-21.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(34) Take heed to yourselves, lest at any time . . .—We again pass into what has nothing corresponding to it in the other reports of the discourse, and may therefore be assumed to be of the nature of a paraphrase. We note in it, as such, that, as far as the New Testament is concerned, St. Luke only uses the words for “overcharged” and “surfeiting” (the latter word belonged, more or less, to the vocabulary of medical science); St. Luke and St. Paul alone those for “drunkenness” (Romans 13:13; Galatians 5:21), and cares “of this life” (1 Corinthians 6:3-4), and “unawares” (1 Thessalonians 5:3). In the last passage we have what reads almost like a distinct echo from this verse. The whole passage, it may be noted, falls in with St. Luke’s characteristic tendency to record all portions of our Lord’s teaching that warned men against sensuality and worldliness.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-21.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And take heed to yourselves, lest at any time your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting, and drunkenness, and cares of this life, and so that day come upon you unawares.
take
8; 17:3; Mark 13:9; Hebrews 12:15
your hearts
12:45; Leviticus 10:9; Proverbs 21:4; Isaiah 28:7; 56:10-12; Hosea 4:11; Romans 13:11-13; 1 Thessalonians 5:6-8; 1 Peter 4:3-7
surfeiting
Deuteronomy 29:19; 1 Samuel 25:36; Isaiah 28:1-3; 1 Corinthians 5:11; 6:10; Galatians 5:20
cares
8:14; 10:41; Matthew 13:22; Mark 4:19; Philippians 4:6
that day
12:46; Psalms 35:8; Matthew 24:39-50; Mark 13:35-37; 1 Thessalonians 5:2-4; 2 Peter 3:10,14; Revelation 3:3
Reciprocal: Genesis 19:35 - GeneralGenesis 27:14 - mother;  Leviticus 2:11 - honey;  Numbers 6:3 - GeneralDeuteronomy 11:16 - Take heed;  Joshua 23:11 - Take good;  Judges 20:34 - knew not;  1 Samuel 30:16 - eating;  2 Samuel 13:28 - heart is merry;  1 Kings 16:9 - drinking;  1 Kings 20:12 - drinking;  Esther 5:12 - to morrow;  Job 1:13 - when;  Proverbs 1:27 - your fear;  Proverbs 23:3 - GeneralProverbs 23:20 - not;  Proverbs 23:34 - thou;  Proverbs 25:16 - lest;  Ecclesiastes 9:12 - the sons;  Isaiah 5:11 - rise;  Isaiah 5:14 - he that rejoiceth;  Isaiah 21:4 - the night;  Isaiah 56:12 - I will;  Ezekiel 12:28 - There shall;  Ezekiel 16:49 - fulness;  Ezekiel 21:10 - should;  Joel 1:5 - Awake;  Matthew 24:38 - they;  Matthew 25:1 - Then;  Mark 4:7 - GeneralMark 13:23 - take;  Mark 13:33 - GeneralMark 13:36 - he find;  Luke 8:7 - thorns;  Luke 12:15 - Take;  Luke 12:19 - take;  Luke 12:40 - GeneralLuke 17:30 - GeneralLuke 18:23 - he was very sorrowful;  Luke 22:46 - Why sleep ye;  Acts 20:28 - Take;  Romans 13:13 - rioting;  1 Corinthians 6:3 - pertain;  1 Corinthians 7:21 - care;  1 Corinthians 7:31 - use;  1 Corinthians 7:35 - and that;  1 Corinthians 15:19 - this;  Galatians 5:21 - drunkenness;  Ephesians 5:18 - be not;  Philippians 4:5 - your;  1 Thessalonians 5:3 - Peace;  1 Thessalonians 5:7 - they that sleep;  1 Timothy 3:3 - Not given to wine;  1 Timothy 4:16 - Take;  1 Peter 1:13 - be sober;  1 Peter 2:11 - abstain;  1 Peter 4:7 - and;  1 Peter 5:8 - sober

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 21:34". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-21.html.