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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 109:31

For He stands at the right hand of the needy, To save him from those who judge his soul.

Adam Clarke Commentary

He shall stand at the right hand of the poor - Even if Satan himself be the accuser, God will vindicate the innocence of his servant. Pilate and the Jews condemned our Lord to death as a malefactor; God showed his immaculate innocence by his resurrection from the dead.

The whole of this Psalm is understood by many as referring solely to Christ, the traitor Judas, and the wicked Jews. This is the view taken of it in the analysis.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-109.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

For he shall stand at the right hand of the poor - He will thus show that he befriends the poor and the helpless.

To save him from those that condemn his soul - - Margin, “from the judges of his soul.” The Hebrew is, “from those that judge his soul.” The meaning is, from those that pronounce a harsh or unjust judgment; from those that condemn the innocent.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-109.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For he shall stand at the right hand of the poor,.... Of the Messiah, as in Psalm 109:22 at whose right hand the Lord was, to guide and direct, help and assist, protect and defend, Psalm 16:8, or of his people, who are poor in every sense; but the Lord is on their side, and is a present help in time of trouble, Psalm 46:1.

To save him from those that condemn his soul: the Messiah: from his judges, the high priest and Jewish sanhedrim, and Pilate the Roman governor, who condemned him to death; but he committed his spirit, or soul, to God, who received it, and raised his body from the dead; and would not suffer it to see corruption, as a testimony of his innocence: or the soul of the poor saints, which the Lord saves from the condemnation of sin, Satan, the law, and their own consciences, Romans 8:1.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-109.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

For he shall stand at the right hand of the poor, to save [him] from those that r condemn his soul.

(r) By this he shows that he had nothing to do with them who were of little power, but with the judges and princes of the world.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/psalms-109.html. 1599-1645.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Moreover, he also subjoins the form in which he rendered thanks; namely, that God stood at the right hand of the poor By this language he intimates, that when God had apparently forsaken and abandoned him, and stood far from him, even then he was always near and ready to render him seasonable and needful help; and, assuredly, his poverty and affliction gave some reason for suspecting that he was forsaken of God, inasmuch as he then either withdrew or concealed his loving-kindness. Notwithstanding of this seeming departure, he acknowledges that, during his affliction and poverty, God never ceased to be present to render him assistance. In saying that he was saved from the judges of his life, he sets forth, in a still stronger light, the very trying situation in which he was placed; his having to deal with very formidable enemies, such as the king and the princes of the realm, who, proudly presuming upon their grandeur and greatness, and regarding his recovery hopeless, treated him as if he had been a dead dog. It is my firm conviction, that in this passage he complains both of the torturing cruelty of his enemies, and also that his character had been unjustly aspersed by calumny and reproach; for we know that he was borne down by the malignity and wickedness of those who, being invested with authority, boastingly, yet falsely, pretended that they wished to act as judges and as the executors of justice, which plausible pretexts they adopt as a cloak for their iniquity.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-109.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 109:31 For he shall stand at the right hand of the poor, to save [him] from those that condemn his soul.

Ver. 31. For he shall stand at the right hand] As a faithful and powerful ( παραστατης or υπεραπιστης) champion, and not as Satan standeth at the persecutor’s right hand, Psalms 109:6.

From those that condemn him] Heb. from the judges of his soul, sc. Saul and his courtiers, who judged him worthy of death,


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-109.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Psalms 109:31. He shall stand at the right hand of the poor That is, to defend, and plead for him. As the accuser stood at the right hand, Psalms 109:6 so shall God also stand there, as this poor and distressed man's advocate, to maintain him against the injurious charge brought against him. The word condemn should rather be rendered oppose, or pursue his soul, or life, i.e. plead against him, so as to call his life in question. Though it was in war, not in judicature, that David's enemies thus contended with him, yet one of these is poetically expressed by the other; their hostile opposition, by words which are only forensic.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, The Psalmist, in the person of the Messiah, addresses his prayer to God, under the oppressions of the wicked.

1. He lodges his appeal with God, under the calumnies of his enemies. Hold not thy peace, as if disregarding his sufferings, O God of my praise or my glorying; for even the Lord Jesus, as man, regarded his father as the object of his worship and glory.

2. He describes the invenomed malice of his enemies, from whose violence he sought deliverance. Wicked in temper and practice, deceitful, with fairest professions covering the blackest designs; liars, whose tongues distilled poison into the incautious ear; filled with hatred, restlesly bent on mischief, they compassed him about; and violent, they with causeless rage fought against him; returned his love with ingratitude and enmity, and rendered evil for the good he shewed them. Thus was Jesus treated; reviled, traduced, betrayed by him who called him master, but sought only to ensnare him: things laid to his charge that he knew not; persecuted, though innocent, with the most implacable vengeance; all his love repaid with hatred; and the astonishing miracles of kindness that he wrought exasperating the resentment of his enemies, and returned by an ignominious crucifixion.

3. Under these trials, prayer was his recourse. I give myself unto prayer, or I am a man of prayer; herein he exercised himself day and night, and even on the cross ceased not to cry, "Father, forgive them." May we learn of our divine Lord thus to pray for those who despitefully use and persecute us!

2nd, They who have blamed David's spirit, as if he appeared vindictive, have mistaken him greatly. When he speaks as a prophet, he foresees and foretels what would be the end of the wicked: when he speaks in the person of the Son of God, he denounces the just judgment due to the children of perdition. Terrible are the woes herein contained; Judas felt them: may we never, by like transgressions, provoke the same punishment.

3rdly, We have the Incarnate Redeemer's complaint and prayer, and his joy in being heard and answered.

1. His condition is very distressing: poor and needy, born in a stable, and having no place to lay his head; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief; his heart wounded with bitterest indignities, and more deeply still with the wrath of God due to the sins that he bore: hurried to the grave by a violent death, as the declining shadow: tossed to and fro, from Pilate to Herod, from Annas to Caiaphas: weak with fasting, and his body emaciated: reproached as a Samaritan, a magician, a mover of sedition, and, even on the cross, insulted by those who shook their heads at him, mocking at his high pretensions of being the Son of God. Note; If our Head thus suffered, let not his members murmur at their lot, under the pressures of poverty, a decaying body, or a reviling world: Jesus hath endured the cross before us.

2. His prayer is very importunate. Deliver, help, and save me: and to this end he pleads God's own glory concerned in vindicating his righteous cause; his mercy, ever ready to succour the poor destitute. Such interposition also would carry conviction of God's interesting himself on his behalf; others would acknowledge his hand, and these enemies themselves be confounded and ashamed: ashamed as penitent; or confounded as criminals. Thus, if God helped and blessed him, he could sit easy under the curses of his enemies, well knowing how impotent they were, and only big with vengeance on themselves. Note; (1.) If God bless us, we need not care how much men curse us. (2.) All our hope must be placed on God's boundless mercy and grace: he alone can help and save us, not we ourselves.

3. His joy is great in the Lord. Among the multitude he will lift up his voice; yea, aloud his praises shall be heard for this great salvation of God. For he shall stand at the right hand of the poor, his Messiah, and all his poor people, to support and protect them; to save him from those that condemn his soul; as he did when he raised up Jesus from the dead, and set him at his own right hand; and as he will do with all his persecuted, faithful, and suffering disciples at the last day, when none shall appear to lay one charge against them, and all their former adversaries shall be found liars.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-109.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

PAUSE, my soul, over the contents of this very, very solemn Psalm. Behold in the traitor Judas, the head and representative of all the despisers of Jesus, the awful but sure consequences of rejecting the Lord of life and glory: and think what must be the end of all such workers of iniquity. If such was the close of that apostate's life, as the scripture records; if such the indignation which fell upon the Jewish nation and their beloved Jerusalem; if such to this hour the wretched state of their posterity; what indignation and wrath, tribulation and anguish, will fall on those who crucify the Son of God afresh, and put him to an open shame! Oh! ye despisers of the Godhead of Jesus! Oh! ye who deny the Lord that bought the church with his blood! think, before it be too late, what horrors and alarms will overwhelm the soul when the Son of God shall come in all his glory, and the glory of his Father, to take vengeance on them who would not that he should reign over them.

Look up, my soul, look up by faith, and in the contemplation of the glory that shall be revealed, behold thy Jesus on his throne of grace, dispensing blessings to all his people. See him as a Lamb in the midst of the throne; all power is his, in heaven and in earth. Look to him for every covenant blessing, for in him it hath pleased the Father that all fulness should dwell. Love him who hath so loved thee: live to him who hath both lived and died for thee: and let all thy fresh springs be in him, in whom is the fountain of life, and in whose light alone thou mayest see light. Hail! ever blessed, ever lovely, and all loving Jesus! Blessed be God for Jesus Christ. Amen.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/psalms-109.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

At the right hand of the poor, to defend him from his adversary, who stood in that place to accuse him, and to procure his condemnation and destruction. See Poole "Psalms 109:6".

That condemn his soul; that pass a sentence of death upon him.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-109.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

31. For he shall stand at the right hand of the poor—The כי, (for, because,) is here most emphatic. This is the sum and object of all that is sought or desired in the psalm, and this is the reason for his “greatly praising the Lord.” Because “he shall stand at the right hand of the poor, to save .” See Psalms 109:16. The “right hand” was the place of the advocate and defender. See on Psalms 109:6, and Psalms 142:4; Psalms 16:8.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-109.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

PSALM CIX. (DIXIT DOMINUS.)

Christ's exultation, and everlasting priesthood.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/psalms-109.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

He shall stand, &c. Contrast this with Psalms 109:6.

poor = needy. Not the same word as in Psalms 109:16.

condemn his soul. Compare the Structure, Psalms 109:20, with Psalms 109:31.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-109.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For he shall stand at the right hand of the poor, to save him from those that condemn his soul.

For he shall stand at the right hand of the poor, to save him from those that condemn his soul. So counteracting "Satan," who also stands at the poor sufferer's right hand to accuse and destroy him (Psalms 109:6; Zechariah 3:1-5). This is the purpose, in relation to us, for which Jesus sits at the right hand of the Father, to be our Advocate (1 John 2:1; Psalms 16:8; Psalms 110:5; Psalms 121:5).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-109.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(31) For he . . .—Jehovah is the poor man’s advocate, just as an adversary was the wicked man’s accuser.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-109.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For he shall stand at the right hand of the poor, to save him from those that condemn his soul.
For he
16:8; 73:23; 110:5; 121:5
poor
16; 68:5; 72:4,12,13; 140:12
to save
10:14; Exodus 22:22-24; Proverbs 22:22,23; Ecclesiastes 5:8; Isaiah 54:17; Acts 4:10-12; 5:30,31
those that condemn
Heb. the judges of.

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-109.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Psalm 109:31

"For he shall stand at the right hand of the poor, to save him from those that condemn his soul."Psalm 109:31

How cheering, how comforting it Isaiah , to have a friend to stand by us when we are in trouble. Such a friend is Jesus. In the hour of necessity, he comes as a friend to stand by the right hand of the poor creature, whose soul is condemned by guilt and accusations. But he stands in a far higher relation than that of a friend; he stands also as a Surety and a Deliverer. He goes, as it were, into the court; and when the prisoner stands at the Baruch , he comes forward and stands at his right hand as his surety and bondsman; he brings out of his own bosom the acquittance of the debt signed and sealed with his own blood, he produces it before the eyes of the court, and claims and demands the acquittal and absolution of the prisoner at whose right hand he stands. He stands there, then, that the prisoner may be freely pardoned, and completely justified from those accusations that "condemn his soul." O sweet standing!—O blessed appearance!

Unbelief, the workings of a desperately wicked heart, and the fearful suggestions of the enemy, come forward to condemn us; but Christ Jesus, this Mediator between God and Prayer of Manasseh , "stands at the right hand of the poor," and produces his own glorious righteousness. Are we pressed down with unbelief? He communicates faith. Is our mind sinking into despair? He breathes into it hope. Is the soul bowed down with guilt, at a distance from God, unable to approach him on account of its heavy temptations? He puts his own arm under this poor dejected soul and lifts up his bowed-down head, and then the soul looks upwards, and instead of wrath sees the countenance of the Father beaming mercy and love, because the Surety is "standing at the right hand of the poor."


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Bibliography
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Psalms 109:31". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/psalms-109.html.

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