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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Psalms 91:9

For you have made the LORD, my refuge, Even the Most High, your dwelling place.


Adam Clarke Commentary

Because thou hast made the Lord - Seeing thou hast taken Jehovah, the Most High, for thy portion and thy refuge, no evil shall come nigh thy dwelling; thou shalt be safe in thy soul, body, household, and property, Psalm 91:10. Every pious man may expect such protection from his God and Father.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/psalms-91.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Because thou hast made the Lord, which is my refuge - literally, “For thou, O Jehovah, (art) my refuge.” The Chaldee Paraphrase regards this as the language of Solomon, who, according to that version, is one of the speakers in the psalm: “Solomon answered and said, ‹Since thou, O Lord, art my refuge,‘” etc. Tholuck regards this as the response of the choir. But this is unnecessary. The idea is, that the psalmist “himself” had made Yahweh his refuge, or his defense. The language is an expression of his own feeling - of his own experience - in having made God his refuge, and is designed here to be a ground of exhortation to others to do the same thing. He could say that he had made God his refuge; he could say that God was now his refuge; and he could appeal to this - to his own experience - when he exhorted others to do the same, and gave them assurance of safety in doing it.

Even the Most High thy habitation - literally, “The Most High hast thou made thy habitation;” or, thy home. On the word habitation, see the notes at Psalm 90:1. The idea is, that he had, as it were, chosen to abide with God, or to dwell with him - to find his home with him as in a father‘s house. The consequence of this, or the security which would follow, he states in the following verses.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-91.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

A MESSIANIC NOTE

"For thou, O Jehovah, art my refuge!

Thou hast made the Most High thy habitation.

There shall no evil befall thee,

Neither shall any plague come nigh thy tent.

For he will give his angels charge over thee,

To keep thee in all thy ways.

They shall bear thee up in their hands,

Lest thou dash thy foot against a stone.

Thou shalt tread upon the lion and the adder:

The young lion and the serpent shalt thou trample under foot."

Briggs stated that there is a Messianic significance in this passage;[8] and certainly Satan himself thought it applied to Christ, for he quoted Psalms 91:11-12 to Jesus Christ in the temptation recorded in Matthew 4:4 and Luke 4:10-11.

Christ, of course refused the Devil's suggestion that he cast himself from the pinnacle of the temple, noting that such an action would tempt God. For our full comments on that episode, see in my New Testament series of commentaries under those references.

"There shall no evil befall thee" (Psalms 91:10). Promises just as glorious as these are provided for the Christians in the New Testament, as for example, in Romans 8:35-39; but as Kidner cautioned, "The assurance here is that nothing can touch God's servant except by God's permission, and that no rebel (Psalms 91:8) can escape God's punishment."[9] Kidner also quoted Luke 21:19 in this connection, indicating that there actually is no exemption whatever to Christians regarding the common dangers and disasters of all men, the great difference for the child of God being that, "The Lord will preserve him through every experience, even death itself."

"He will give his angels charge over thee" (Psalms 91:11). This promise has its New Testament echo in Hebrews 1:13-14, where it is stated that "all," the entire host of the heavenly angels, are charged with the duty of ministering unto them that shall be the heirs of salvation.

The following things which angels do for the redeemed are mentioned in the Bible: (1) They bear away the souls of the righteous in death (Luke 16:22). (2) They oppose purposes and designs of Satan, not in their own names, but in the name of the Lord (Jude 1:1:6). (3) They execute God's judgments upon the incorrigibly wicked (2 Kings 19:35; Acts 12:23). (4) They exert influence upon rulers and governments (Daniel 10:20. (5) They aid providentially in bringing the unsaved to hear the saving gospel of Christ (Acts 10:3). (6) They exercise watchful care over little children (Matthew 18:10). (7) They maintain perpetually the availability of the Word of God for the human race. The Rainbow Angel stands upon the land and the sea, having in his hand "a little book, OPEN." That little BOOK is the New Testament (Revelation 10).

"Thou shalt tread upon the lion and the adder" (Psalms 91:13). Briggs translated this line, "Upon reptile and cobra thou wilt tread"[10] but the new versions do not honor that rendition. A similar blessing is seen in the life of Paul who shook the poisonous viper off into the fire (Acts 28:3-6).


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-91.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Because thou hast made the Lord which is my refuge,.... So the words, according to Kimchi, also are directed to the good man; giving the reason of his safety, because he trusts in the Lord, and puts himself under his protection: but they should rather be rendered, and the accents require such a reading, "because thou, Lord, art my refuge"F20כי אתה יהוה מחסי "quniam tu Domine spes mea", Pagninus, Montanus, Musculus; "nam tu O Jehova es receptus meus", Cocceius; so Piscator; "quia tu Domine, es perfugium meum", De Dieu, Gejerus. ; and so are either the words of the good man that trusts in the Lord; or rather of the psalmist himself, seeing his safety in the midst of danger, and ascribing it to the Lord; whose providence was in a peculiar manner over him, whose power protected him, and he was as an asylum or city of refuge to him; so that nothing could hurt him:

even the most High, thy habitation; it should be rendered, "thou hast made the most High thy habitation"; being an apostrophe of the psalmist to his own soul, observing the ground of his security; the most high God being made and used by him as his habitation, or dwelling place, where he dwelt, as every good man does, safely, quietly, comfortably, pleasantly, and continually: the Targum makes them to be the words of Solomon, paraphrasing them thus,

"Solomon answered, and thus he said, thou thyself, O Lord, art my confidence; in an high habitation thou hast put the house of thy majesty.'


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/psalms-91.html. 1999.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

9Because thou, Jehovah, art my protection. He dwells at this length in commendation of the providence of God, as knowing how slow men naturally are to resort to God in a right manner; and how much they need to be stimulated to this duty, and to be driven from those false and worldly refuges in which they confide. There is a change of person frequently throughout this psalm: thus, in the first verse, he addresses God, and afterwards addresses himself. God he styles his protection, — in this manner, by his own example, recommending others to have recourse to God as their help. So, afterwards, he addresses himself, that he may be the better persuaded of the sincerity of his inward affection. The true method of testing our faith is to turn our thoughts inward upon ourselves, and, when no human eye sees us, to search our own spirits. If, not content with having to do with God only, we turn our eyes to men, it is almost impossible to prevent pride from insinuating itself into the room of faith. He speaks of accounting God to be his house or refuge, because he defends us from every evil, as in Psalms 90:1. This verse may be considered as connected with that which follows, and as stating the cause or reason of what is there asserted; for it is added, There shall no evil befall thee. And how are coming evils averted, but just by our resting with confidence in the protection of God? Troubles, it is true, of various kinds assail the believer as well as others, but the Psalmist means that God stands between him and the violence of every assault, so as to preserve him from being overwhelmed. The Divine guardianship is represented as extending to the whole household of the righteous; and we know that God comprehends under his love the children of such as he has adopted into his fatherly favor. Or, perhaps, the term may be taken in its simpler sense, and nothing more be intended than that those who choose God for their refuge will dwell safely in their houses.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/psalms-91.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Psalms 91:9 Because thou hast made the LORD, [which is] my refuge, [even] the most High, thy habitation;

Ver. 9. Because thou hast made the Lord, which is my refuge, &c.] Because thou hast done as I do, thou shalt speed as I have sped; for God is rich in mercy to all his.

Even the Most High thy habitation] See Psalms 90:1.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/psalms-91.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Or, as the words lie in the Hebrew, and others render them, Because thou, O Lord, are my refuge, thou, O my soul, (which is easily understood out of the foregoing words, and to which David oft suddenly turneth his speech,) hast made the Most High thine habitation; which is the only ground and reason of that safety last mentioned. As for the variation of persons, that he sometimes speaketh to and of others, and sometimes to and of himself, nothing is more frequent in this book; nor doth it make any alteration in the sense.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/psalms-91.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9. The Lord… my refuge—On the person speaking here see note on Psalms 91:2-3


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/psalms-91.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Because Thou, &c. Hebrew reads "For thou, O LORD, [art] my refuge. "The change of person marks the Structure, and is not due to "textual corruption".

Which is. Omit these italics.

Even, &c. Hebrew reads "The MOST HIGH [thou hast made] thy habitation", supplying the Ellipsis from the preceding line.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/psalms-91.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Because thou hast made the LORD, which is my refuge, even the most High, thy habitation;

Because thou hast made the Lord, (which is) my refuge, (even) the Most High, thy habitation - rather, as the Hebrew has the order, 'Because thou, O Lord, (art) my refuge, thou hast made the Most High thy habitation' (cf. Psalms 90:1). In the first clause the person being taught by the Psalmist responds to his exhortation, using the first person "my," as in Psalms 91:2, "I ... my." In the second clause the Psalmist resumes the character of teacher, addressing the learner with "thou ... thy." See on this change of person the introductory remarks. The close of this first part of the psalm is marked by the repetition of the same thought as at the close of the introduction (Psalms 91:2).

Christ responds to the inspired Word, which guarantees His preservation by the Father from the foe. The reason is, "because thou Lord, art my refuge;" to which the Church replies, "thou hast made the Most High thy habitation."


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/psalms-91.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) Thou . . . my.—The difficulty of the change of person is avoided by the Authorised Version, but only with violence to the text, which runs, “For thou, Jehovah, my refuge; thou hast made the Most High thy habitation.” It is best to take the first line as a kind of under-soliloquy. The poet is assuring himself of the protection which will be afforded one who trusts in God; and he interrupts his soliloquy, as it were, with a comment upon it: “Yes, this is true of myself, for Thou Jehovah art indeed my refuge.” (For the Most High as a dwelling place, see Psalms 90:1.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/psalms-91.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Because thou hast made the LORD, which is my refuge, even the most High, thy habitation;
Because
2; 142:4,5; 146:5,6
most high
1; 71:3; 90:1

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Psalms 91:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/psalms-91.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020
the Week of Proper 20 / Ordinary 25
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