Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 16:5

And I heard the angel of the waters saying, "Righteous are You, who are and who were, O Holy One, because You judged these things;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - God;   God Continued...;   Temple;   Water;   Wicked (People);   Scofield Reference Index - Resurrection;   The Topic Concordance - God;   Judges;   Righteousness;   Wrath;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Righteousness of God, the;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Babylon;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Judgment;   Justification;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Justice;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Heaven;   Justice of God;   Order;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Athaliah;   Holman Bible Dictionary - I Am;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Antichrist;   Holiness;   Plagues of Egypt;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Alpha and Omega (2);   Angels;   Blood;   Colossians, Epistle to the;   Enoch Book of;   God;   Holiness Purity;   Mediator;   Nathanael ;   Righteous, Righteousness;   Righteousness;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Vials;   9 Holy Pious;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Angel;   Revelation of John:;   Sore;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The angel of the waters - The rabbins attribute angels, not only to the four elements so called, but to almost every thing besides. We have already seen the angel of the bottomless pit, Revelation 9:11, and the angel of the fire, Revelation 14:18. The angel of the earth is spoken of in Yalcut Rubeni, fol. 13, 2, and is called Admael. They have also an angel that presides over the grass; another that presides over the cattle which feed upon the grass.

They say that God employed the angel of the sea to swallow up the waters at the creation, that the dry land might appear. He disobeyed, and God slew him; the name of the angel of the sea is Rahab. See Baba bathra, fol. 74, 2. It is plain from several places that the writer of the Apocalypse keeps these notions distinctly in view.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-16.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And I heard the angel of the waters say - The angel who presides over the element of water; in allusion to the common opinion among the Hebrews that the angels presided over elements, and that each element was committed to the jurisdiction of a particular angel. Compare the notes on Revelation 7:1.

Thou art righteous, O Lord - In view of the judgments that reddened these streams and fountains with the blood of people, the angel ascribes righteousness to God. These judgments seemed terrible - the numbers slain were so vast - the bloody stream indicated so great slaughter, and such severity of the divine judgment; yet the angel sees in all this only the act of a righteous God bringing just retribution on the guilty.

Which art, and wast, and shalt be - That is, who art eternal - existing now; who hast existed in all past time; and who will exist ever onward. See the notes on Revelation 1:8. The reason why this attribute of God is here referred to, seems to be that the mind of the angel adverts to it in the changes and desolations that were occurring around him. In such overturnings among people - such revolutions of kingdoms - such desolations of war - the mind naturally turns to one who is unchanging; to one whose throne is from everlasting to everlasting.

Because thou hast judged thus - Hast suffered these wars to occur that have changed rivers and fountains to blood.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-16.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And I heard the angel of the waters saying, Righteous art thou, who art and who wast, thou Holy One, because thou didst thus judge:

And I heard the angel of the waters ... It is probably a mistake to tie this reference in with the extensive angelology of the Jews. What is probably meant is merely the angel who had poured out the bowl of wrath on the waters.

Righteous art thou, who art and who wast ... We might have expected the phrase "and who is to come" until it is remembered that this vision reveals the state of things when the coming of Christ has already begun.

Thou Holy One, because thou didst thus judge ... This with the next two verses is a kind of parenthesis to show that such terrible judgments are in no sense to be construed as unbecoming or out of character in the one true and living God who gave his Son for our redemption. No! These judgments are exactly what the God of love should do. "The pouring out of the bowls is not a series of arbitrary actions, but a solemn judgment."[20] When people are fully determined and have decided that they will not obey God, nothing could be more just and honorable on the part of the Father than to turn them loose, give them up, harden their hearts, and deliver them completely into the hands of the devil whom they have chosen to obey. That is exactly the state of the situation prophesied here.

ENDNOTE:

[20] Leon Morris, op. cit., p. 194.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-16.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And I heard the angel of the waters say,.... So we read in Jewish writingsF20T. Bab. Gittin, fol. 68. 3. of an angel that was שרא דימא, "the prince of the sea", and of angels that were over the waters, and others over fireF21Yalkut Simeoni, par. 2. fol. 58. 4. par. 2. fol. 167. 4. ; though here is designed not one of the מלאכי מים "angels of the water", that presided ove the waters, as another over fire; See Gill on Revelation 14:18, but the third angel that poured out his vial upon the waters; when he had so done, he said as follows. Dr. Lightfoot thinks, and that not without reason, that since these angels appeared in the garb of priests, Revelation 15:6 and since there was a priest appointed to take care of the wells, and fountains, and ditches about Jerusalem, that the people might have water at the feastsF23Maimon, Cele Hamikdash, c. 7. sect. 15. , there is an allusion to him; and certain it is that there was such an officer; there was one Nechoniah, who was over the fountains and ditchesF24Misn. Shekalim, c. 5. sect. 1. ; and in the same office was Nicodemon ben GorionF25Abot R. Nathan, c. 5. fol. 3. 2. , thought to be the Nicodemus mentioned in the New Testament.

Thou art righteous, O Lord, which art, and wast, and shall be: which may be understood either of God the Father, who had power over these plagues, Revelation 16:9 and sent them; or of the Lord Jesus Christ, who is Lord of all, and is righteous in all his ways and works, in all his judgments on antichrist, and is the eternal "I AM", which is, and was, and shall be; see Revelation 1:8. The Alexandrian copy, and most others, and the Vulgate Latin and Syriac versions, read "holy", instead of "shalt be"; for the purity and holiness of Christ will be seen in the judgments which he will exercise, as follows:

because thou hast judged thus; or "these things"; or "them", as the Ethiopic version reads; that is, has brought these judgments upon the men signified by rivers and fountains, and made great havoc and slaughter of them, expressed by their becoming blood; the justice of which appears from the following reason.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-16.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

angel of the waters — that is, presiding over the waters.

O Lord — omitted by A, B, C, Vulgate, Syriac, Coptic, and Andreas.

and shalt be — A, B, C, Vulgate, and Andreas for this clause read, “(which art and wast) holy.” The Lord is now no longer He that shall come, for He is come in vengeance and therefore the third of the three clauses found in Revelation 1:4, Revelation 1:8; Revelation 4:8 is here and in Revelation 11:17 omitted.

judged thus — literally, “these things.” “Thou didst inflict this judgment.”

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-16.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

The angel of the waters (του αγγελου τον υδατωνtou aggelou ton hudatōn). Genitive case object of ηκουσαēkousa See Revelation 7:1 for the four angels in control of the winds and Revelation 14:18 for the angel with power over fire. The rabbis spoke also of an angel with power over the earth and another over the sea.

Which art and which wast (ο ων και ο ηνho ōn kai ho ēn). See this peculiar idiom for God‘s eternity with οho as relative before ηνēn in Revelation 1:4, Revelation 1:8; Revelation 4:8, but without ο ερχομενοςho erchomenos (the coming on, the one who is to be) there for the future as in Revelation 11:17.

Thou Holy One (ο οσιοςho hosios). Nominative form, but vocative case, as often. Note both δικαιοςdikaios and οσιοςhosios applied to God as in Revelation 3:1; Revelation 15:3.

Because thou didst thus judge (οτι ταυτα εκριναςhoti tauta ekrinas). Reason for calling God δικαιοςdikaios and οσιοςhosios The punishment on the waters is deserved. First aorist active indicative of κρινωkrinō to judge.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-16.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

The angel of the waters

Set over the waters as other angels over the winds (Revelation 7:1) and over the fire (Revelation 14:18).

O Lord

Omit.

And shalt be

Following the reading ὁ ἐσόμενος . Read ὁ ὅσιος ThouHoly One.

Thou didst thus judge ( παῦτα ἔκρινας )

Lit., Thou didst judge these things.

Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-16.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And I heard the angel of the waters say, Thou art righteous, O Lord, which art, and wast, and shalt be, because thou hast judged thus.

The Gracious one — So he is styled when his judgments are abroad, and that with a peculiar propriety. In the beginning of the book he is termed "The Almighty." In the time of his patience, he is praised for his power, which otherwise might then be less regarded. In the time of his taking vengeance, for his mercy. Of his power there could then be no doubt.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-16.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

5 And I heard the angel of the waters say, Thou art righteous, O Lord, which art, and wast, and shalt be, because thou hast judged thus.

Ver. 5. The angel of the waters] The same that poured forth his vial upon the waters, Revelation 16:4.

Thou art righteous] God’s judgments are sometimes secret, always just, and so to be acknowledged. We shall one day see the reason of all, and say as Jehu did, 2 Kings 9:36.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-16.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

These verses seem to be a key to let us into the right understanding of the verses immediately foregoing; and clearly show, that as the idolatrous enemies of the church did shed the blood of saints and martyrs, so should theirs be shed: which is called their having blood to drink.

Here note, 1. The approbation which the angel gives of the equity and righteousness of God's judgments upon these bloody persecutors. Righteous art thou, O Lord, for thou hast given them blood to drink. Where the retribution which God makes of blood for blood, shows the righteousness of God in his judgments inflicted; and also declares that Almighty God doth sometimes so suit his judgments to the sin committed, that persons may read their sin in their punishment. As these persecutors thirsted after blood, so here they get blood to drink.

Note, 2. How the angel in the fifth verse, and the other in the seventh verse, do both rejoice in the execution of God's judgments, and in the terrible revenge of the blood of saints. For thus they sing, Righteous art thou, O Lord, and just are thy judgments.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/revelation-16.html. 1700-1703.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 16:5. (178) καὶ ἦν, which art and which wast) See on ch. Revelation 11:17, and comp. D. Lang. Comm. Apoc. f. 188.— ὅσιος) Others put καὶ before , or for , or omit καὶ .(179) Sound exegesis often distinguishes the pearls of a genuine reading from the filth of various readings: and Wolf excellently compares with this the passage, ch. Revelation 1:8, κύριος θεὸς, ὢν καὶ ἦν καὶ ἐρχό΄ενος, παντοκράτωρ. It will also be profitable to have brought forward another, ch. Revelation 4:8 : ἅγιος, ἅγιος, ἅγιος, κύριος θεὸς παντοκράτωρ, ἦν καὶ ὢν καὶ ἐρχό΄ενος. There is a very great resemblance between those two passages and this passage, which is thus: δίκαιος εἶ, ὢν καὶ ἦν, ὅσιος. The subject there is, κύριος θεὸς ὢν καὶ ἦν καὶ ἐρχό΄ενος· here, in the vocative case, ὢν καὶ ἦν. The epithet belonging to the subject is there, παντοκράτωρ· here, in the same case, ὅσιος· in both places without the particle καὶ. The predicate there, ch. Revelation 4:8, is ἅγιος· here δίκαιος. For the sentence is not to be thus construed, δίκαιος καὶ ὅσιος since there are many intervening words in the text. At the commencement and at the close of the Apocalypse the Lord is called παντοκράτωρ, the Almighty; here, where judgments show themselves, He is called ὅσιος, the Holy. First of all He is praised on account of His Might, lest in the time of His patience He should appear to have no strength, whereas in the end He is about to display enough of Might; afterwards He is praised for His Grace, when retribution commences. Might and Grace are alike assigned to the Lord in Psalms 62:11-12. The epithet ὅσιος answers to the Hebrew חסיד, and signifies gracious, in an active or a passive sense. God exhibits His own grace in all His works, and He receives gratitude [the attribution of grace] from all saints.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-16.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

This and the two following verses do but express the honour and glory that shall be given unto God, when he shall have accomplished his great work in destroying those who feed, and uphold, and maintain the beast, partly by those instruments he shall use in that work, expressed here by

the angel of the waters, partly from others.

Thou art righteous. O Lord, which art, and wast, and shalt be, because thou hast judged thus; acknowledging the Lord’s justice and righteousness in such destruction.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-16.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Который еси и был, и свят Эта фраза выражает Божие бессмертие (ср. 1:4, 8; 4:8; 11:17). Шестой стих говорит, что вечный Бог будет судить справедливо, потому что они убили верующих и проповедников Евангелия (6:9-11; 7:9-17; 11:18; 17:6; 18:20). Эту бойню нельзя сравнить ни с чем в истории (Мф. 24:21), так же, как и возмездие Божие (ср. Рим. 12:19-21).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-16.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The angel of the waters; that had charge of the waters. Compare chap Revelation 7:1, where four angels have charge of four winds.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-16.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The "angel of the waters" evidently refers to the angel responsible for the sea and fresh water, the superintendent of God"s water department. Scripture reveals that angels affect the elemental forces of nature (cf. Psalm 104:4; Hebrews 1:7; Revelation 7:1; Revelation 9:11; Revelation 14:18). This angel attributes righteousness to the eternal God for judging in kind (cf. Revelation 15:3-4; Galatians 6:7). The holy and righteous God can judge humanity according to the lex talionis principle because He is eternal.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-16.html. 2012.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

righteous. App-191.

O Lord. The texts omit.

and Shalt be. The texts read "Thou Holy One".

judged. App-122.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-16.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And I heard the angel of the waters say, Thou art righteous, O Lord, which art, and wast, and shalt be, because thou hast judged thus.

Angel of (presiding over) the waters. O Lord. Omitted by 'Aleph (') A B C, Vulgate, Syriac, Coptic, Andreas.

And shalt be. 'Aleph (') A B C, Vulgate, Andreas, for this clause, read, '(which art and wast) holy' [ hosios (Greek #3741) for ho (Greek #3588) esomenos]. The Lord is no longer He that shall be, for He is come in vengeance; therefore the third of the three clauses, Revelation 1:4; Revelation 1:8; Revelation 4:8, is here, and in Revelation 11:17, omitted.

Judged thus - `these things.' 'Thou didst inflict this judgment.'

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-16.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) And I heard the angel of the waters . . .—That is, the angel who was set over the waters, or the angel who is, on the heavenly side, representative of the waters. (See Excursus A: On the Angels.) The angel acknowledges God’s righteousness. Thou art righteous . . . because Thou didst judge these things—i.e., because of the righteous law which these judgments manifested.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-16.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And I heard the angel of the waters say, Thou art righteous, O Lord, which art, and wast, and shalt be, because thou hast judged thus.
the angel
4
Thou art
7; 15:3; 19:2; Genesis 18:25; Psalms 129:4; 145:17; Lamentations 1:18; Daniel 9:14; Romans 2:5; Romans 3:5; 2 Thessalonians 1:5,6
which art
1:4,8; 4:8; 11:17
Reciprocal: Genesis 2:4 - Lord;  Judges 5:2 - for the avenging;  2 Kings 11:16 - there was she slain;  2 Chronicles 23:15 - they slew her there;  Psalm 7:7 - So;  Psalm 21:13 - so will;  Psalm 48:11 - because;  Psalm 50:6 - heavens;  Psalm 51:4 - when;  Psalm 52:6 - righteous;  Psalm 65:5 - righteousness;  Isaiah 14:4 - How;  Isaiah 24:16 - glory;  Ezekiel 35:6 - I will;  Luke 6:38 - with;  Luke 7:29 - justified;  Luke 13:9 - if not;  Romans 2:2 - judgment;  Revelation 6:10 - dost;  Revelation 13:15 - cause;  Revelation 18:6 - Reward

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-16.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 16:5. — "The angel of the waters" seems at first sight an ambiguous expression. But when it is borne in mind the large part which angels occupy in the economy of the redemption of the inheritance the expression assumes a definiteness quite in keeping with other portions of the book. Almost every subject in the Apocalypse has its angel. An angel is the intermediary between Christ and John (Revelation 1:1); the seven churches have each their angel or moral representative, not a celestial being (Revelation 2:1-29; Revelation 3:1-22); an angel challenges the universe to produce one competent to fulfil the counsels of God respecting the earth (Revelation 5:2); the numberless throng of angels worship the Lamb (vv. 11, 12); angels control the elements (Revelation 7:1); an angel seals the servants of God (vv. 2, 3); each Trumpet and each Vial has its respective angel (Revelation 8:1-13; Revelation 16:1-21); angels are the combatants in the heavenly war (Revelation 12:1-17); an angel announces the Everlasting Gospel (Revelation 14:6); an angel proclaims the fall of Babylon (v. 8); an angel declares the awful doom of the worshippers of the Beast (v. 9); an angel comes out of the temple (v. 15); and another out of the altar (v. 18). If the winds, the fire, and the abyss have each an angel, the waters too have their appropriate and guardian angel. The peoples symbolised by the waters (Revelation 17:15) are controlled by an angel, all, however, under the governing hand of God.

The angel of the waters acquiesces in the divine judgment. It might be naturally supposed that he would deprecate judicial and retributive dealing in the sphere over which he presides. On the contrary, he justifies God, saying, "Thou art righteous." The plague does not overstep by a hairbreadth the just measure of strict righteousness. Then the eternity of God's Being, "Who art," and His past relation to men and angels, "and wast," are next affirmed.{*See remarks in our Exposition on Revelation 1:4; Revelation 1:8; Revelation 4:8; Revelation 11:17.} "The holy One." This peculiar word occurs but twice in the New Testament in relation to Christ: the other instance is in Revelation 15:4.

In the Authorised Version of verse 5 the words "O Lord" and "shalt be" are unnecessary interpolations, and are rejected by most critics, while the title the "holy One" is omitted (see R.V.).

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition available at BibleSupport.com. Public Domain.
Bibliographical Information
Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-16.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Angel of the waters is the one in the preceding verse. These angels form a unit (seven) and hence any principle held by one goes for all of them. The angel commended the action of the Lord for the righteous judgments inflicted upon the servants of the beast. Art, and wast and shalt be is the same as saying that God had no beginning and will have no end. Such a Being cannot do wrong hence his judgments against His enemies are bound to be just.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-16.html. 1952.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5.The angel of the waters—Note on Revelation 14:18. The water-angel might have complained at this sanguinary invasion of his domain, but he humbly acknowledges the divine justice. Note Revelation 18:6. Not for his own sin, nor for the guilt of the waters, is this terrible transformation; but for the guilt of man, the idolatry of Babylon.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-16.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 16:5. and are used together of God in hieratic inscriptions of dedication throughout Asia Minor, possibly under Jewish influence. , often a title of messiah (see on Revelation 3:1 and Beer’s note on En. xxxviii. 2), is reserved here for God. Retribution is the outcome of God’s intense holiness or majesty (cf.Revelation 6:10, Revelation 15:4) asserting itself on behalf of his people (Revelation 15:3, Revelation 19:2, cf.Revelation 3:7) and in self-vindication.

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 16:5". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-16.html. 1897-1910.