Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 18:7

To the degree that she glorified herself and lived sensuously, to the same degree give her torment and mourning; for she says in her heart, ‘I sit as a queen and I am not a widow , and will never see mourning.'
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Confidence;   Pride;   Security;   The Topic Concordance - Judges;   Plague;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Commerce;   Presumption;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Poetry of the Hebrews;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - City;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Widow;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Babylon;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Debt, Debtor;   Mourning;   Queen ;   Torment;   Widows;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Babylon the Great ;   Deliciously, to Live;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Babel;   Babylon;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Queen;   Widow;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Deliciously;   Queen;   Sorrow;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

How much she hath glorified herself - By every act of transgression and sinful pampering of the body she has been preparing for herself a suitable and proportionate punishment.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-18.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

How much she hath glorified herself - Been proud, boastful, arrogant. This was true of ancient Babylon, that she was proud and haughty; and it has been no less true of mystical Babylon - papal Rome.

And lived deliciously - By as much as she has lived in luxury and dissoluteness, so let her suffer now. The word used here and rendered “lived deliciously” - ἐστρηνίασεν estrēniasen- is derived from the noun - στρῆνος strēnos- which is used in Revelation 18:3, and rendered “delicacies.” See the notes on that verse. It means properly, “to live strenuously, rudely,” as in English, “to live hard”; and then to revel, to live in luxury, riot, dissoluteness. No one can doubt the propriety of this as descriptive of ancient Babylon, and as little can its propriety be doubted as applied to papal Rome.

So much torment and sorrow give her - Let her punishment correspond with her sins. This is expressing substantially the same idea which occurs in the previous verse.

For she saith in her heart - This is the estimate which she forms of herself.

I sit a queen - Indicative of pride, and of an asserted claim to rule.

And am no widow - Am not in the condition of a widow - a state of depression, sorrow, and mourning. All this indicates security and self-confidence, a description in every way applicable to papal Rome.

And shall see no sorrow - This is indicative of a state where there was nothing feared, notwithstanding all the indications which existed of approaching calamity. In this state we may expect to find papal Rome, even when its last judgments are about to come upon it; in this state it has usually been; in this state it is now, notwithstanding all the indications that are abroad in the world that its power is waning, and that the period of its fall approaches.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-18.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

How much she hath glorified herself,.... And acted the proud and haughty part in exalting herself above all emperors, kings, and princes, above all kingdoms and states, and also above all churches, assuming arrogant titles, and even blasphemous names; see Revelation 13:1

and lived deliciously: in a very luxuriant manner, as the popes, cardinals, archbishops, bishops, priests, monks, and friars have done; some being clothed in purple and scarlet, and in gold and silver, and all living upon the fat of the land, and in rioting and drunkenness, in chambering and wantonness:

so much torment and sorrow give her: by pulling down her pride, which goes before a fall, than which nothing could more torment and afflict her; by stripping her of her fine clothes and rich apparel; and by taking away her fat benefices from her, which will cut her to the heart; and by burning her with fire, which will be very excruciating:

for she saith in her heart, I sit a queen; a lady of kingdoms, as in Isaiah 47:5 to which the reference is; having a temporal power and authority over the kings of the earth, and a spiritual jurisdiction over all churches, apostate ones, being the mother of harlots; and her "sitting" as such, as it well agrees with the whore on many waters, and the woman on the scarlet coloured beast and seven mountains, who are all the same, and is very suitable to antichrist, who pretends to sit in Peter's chair, and does sit in the temple of God, as if he was God; so it is expressive of her empire and government over nations and churches, and of the continuance of it, as she imagines, see Isaiah 46:7 and so the Ethiopic version renders it, "I shall reign always": to which she adds,

and am no widow; nor never shall be, as she flatters herself, see Isaiah 47:8. Were she the true spouse of Christ, as she boasts herself, she indeed would be no widow, for Christ is an everlasting and never dying husband; but she is the whore of the kings of the earth, and though she fancies she shall be no widow, that is, bereft of people and power, see Lamentations 1:1 because she now sits on many waters, people, multitudes, and nations and tongues; yet ere long, like old Babylon, she will have no men in her, but will be inhabited by devils, foul spirits, and hateful birds:

and shall see no sorrow; through loss of children, power, and authority; see Isaiah 47:8 but in this also she will be mistaken; her children will be killed with death, as is threatened to Jezebel, Revelation 2:23 and her plagues shall come upon her at once: now these words may be considered either as spoken by her when in the height of her power and glory, as she was about three or four hundred years ago; or just before her destruction, which seems to be the case, and looks as if she would regain her power, and be in her former state before her utter ruin; See Gill on Revelation 11:2.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-18.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

How much she hath glorified herself, and lived deliciously, so much torment and sorrow give her: for she saith b in her heart, I sit a queen, and am c no widow, and shall d see no sorrow.

(b) With herself.

(c) I am full of people and mighty.

(d) I shall taste of none.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-18.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

How much — that is in proportion as.

lived deliciously — luxuriously: see on Revelation 18:3, where the Greek is akin.

sorrowGreek, “mourning,” as for a dead husband.

I sit — so Vulgate. But A, B, and C prefix “that.”

I  …  am no widow — for the world power is my husband and my supporter.

shall see no sorrowGreek, “mourning.” “I am seated (this long time)  …  I am no widow  …  I shall see no sorrow,” marks her complete unconcerned security as to the past, present, and future [Bengel]. I shall never have to mourn as one bereft of her husband. As Babylon was queen of the East, so Rome has been queen of the West, and is called on Imperial coins “the eternal city.” So Papal Rome is called by Ammian Marcellin [15.7]. “Babylon is a former Rome, and Rome a latter Babylon. Rome is a daughter of Babylon, and by her, as by her mother, God has been pleased to subdue the world under one sway” [Augustine]. As the Jew‘s restoration did not take place till Babylon‘s fall, so R. Kimchi on Obadiah, writes, “When Rome (Edom) shall be devastated, there shall be redemption to Israel.” Romish idolatries have been the great stumbling-blocks to the Jews‘ acceptance of Christianity.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-18.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

How much soever (οσαhosa). Indefinite quantitative relative pronoun οσοςhosos in the accusative (cognate) neuter plural object of εδοχασενedoxasen (first aorist active indicative of δοχαζωdoxazō).

Herself (αυτηνhautēn). Reflexive pronoun, accusative also with εδοχασενedoxasen wanton (εστρηνιασενestrēniasen). First aorist (ingressive) active indicative of στρηνιαωstrēniaō (to live luxuriously), verb in late comedy instead of τρυπαωtruphaō (James 5:5), from στρηνοςstrēnos (Revelation 18:3), only here in N.T.

So much give her of torment and mourning (τοσουτον δοτε αυτηι βασανισμον και πεντοςtosouton dote autēi basanismon kai penthos). Second aorist active imperative of διδωμιdidōmi to give. The correlative pronoun τοσουτονtosouton is masculine singular accusative, agreeing with βασανισμονbasanismon for which see Revelation 9:5; Revelation 14:11, and is understood with the neuter word πεντοςpenthos (mourning), in N.T. only in James 4:9; Revelation 18:7.; Revelation 21:4 (kin to πατοσ πενομαιpathosκατημαι βασιλισσαpenomai).

I sit a queen (βασιλειαkathēmai basilissa). Predicate nominative for the old form βασιλιςbasileia (και χηρα ουκ ειμιbasilis), as in Matthew 12:42. Babylon and Tyre had preceded Rome in such boasting (Isaiah 47:7-9; Ezekiel 27:3; Ezekiel 28:2; Zephaniah 2:15).

And am no widow (χηροςkai chēra ouk eimi). Feminine of the adjective πεντος ου μη ιδωchēros (barren), old word (Mark 12:40).

Shall in no wise see mourning (πεντοςpenthos ou mē idō). Confident boast of security with emphatic position of ου μηpenthos (see above) and double negative οραωou mē with the second aorist active subjunctive of horaō (defective verb).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-18.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Lived deliciously ( ἐστρηνίασεν )

See on Revelation 18:3.

Torment ( βασανισμὸν )

Only in Revelation. On the kindred word, βάσανος tormentsee on Matthew 4:23, Matthew 4:24.

I sit a queen and am no widow

See Isaiah 47:8; Zephaniah 2:15.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-18.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

How much she hath glorified herself, and lived deliciously, so much torment and sorrow give her: for she saith in her heart, I sit a queen, and am no widow, and shall see no sorrow.

As much as she hath glorified herself — By pride, and pomp, and arrogant boasting.

And lived deliciously — In all kinds of elegance, luxury, and wantonness.

So much torment give her — Proportioning the punishment to the sin.

Because she saith in her heart — As did ancient Babylon, Isaiah 47:8,9.

I sit — Her usual style. Hence those expressions, "The chair, the see of Rome: he sat so many years." As a queen - Over many kings, "mistress of all churches; the supreme; the infallible; the only spouse of Christ; out of which there is no salvation." And am no widow - But the spouse of Christ.

And shall see no sorrow — From the death of my children, or any other calamity; for God himself will defend "the church."

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-18.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

7 How much she hath glorified herself, and lived deliciously, so much torment and sorrow give her: for she saith in her heart, I sit a queen, and am no widow, and shall see no sorrow.

Ver. 7. She hath glorified herself] As mother of Churches, queen of nations. Steuchus (one of her parasites) saith, That kings have but the use and administration of their kingdoms; the right and property belongs to her. Pope Boniface wrote thus to Philip the Fair, king of France: Volumus te scire te in temporali et spirituali nobis subiacere, &c. Contra sentientes pro insanis habemus: We would ye should know, that ye are to be subject unto us both in temporals and spirituals; and that none that are in their right minds can be otherwise minded. The king thus answered him again, Sciat tua maxima fatuitas, &c., I would your singular foolishness should know that I acknowledge no such subjection, &c. (Alsted. Chron.) It was tartly and trimly replied by one Leonard to Rustandus the pope’s envoy, claiming all the churches here in England to be the pope’s, Omnes Ecclesias Papae esse, tuitione non fruitione, defensione non dissipatione; That if the pope had such right to all the churches, it was to defend them, not to devour them. (Jac. Rev. de Vit. Pontif., p. 178.)

So much torment, &c.] Thus the sinner’s cup of honey endeth in the dregs of gall; as Herodotus writeth of the river Hypanis, that the first day’s journey from the fountain and head of it the water is sweet and wholesome; but after that, exceeding bitter. Pleasure and pain are tied together with chains of adamant. Oh, how short is the wicked man’s Hilary term! {a}

{a} humorous. to keep Hilary term: to maintain hilarity, be cheerful or merry. Obs. ŒD

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-18.html. 1865-1868.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 18:7. κάθημαιοὐκ εἰμὶοὐ μὴ ἴδω) κάθημαι, from ἧμαι· ἧμαι, a present, has the force of a perfect, from ἓω, as στήκω from στάω, and ἥκω from the same ἓω. Therefore Babylon displays the most unconcerned security as respects the past, the present, and the future time. She calls herself Queen: and Bossuet is in error, when he thinks that a corrupt church only, and not also a royal city, is sought by us in Rome. Both are had in view. See ch. Revelation 17:5; Revelation 17:18.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-18.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

How much she hath glorified herself, and lived deliciously, so much torment and sorrow give her: this speaketh thus much; That whenever God’s time cometh for the ruin of the papacy, the condition of all that party shall appear as miserable as it appears now splendid and happy.

For she saith in her heart, I sit a queen, and am no widow, and shall see no sorrow; and one great reason of this so great affliction, will be the pride, presumption, and security of that faction, much after the rate of old Babylon, Isaiah 47:8. Old Babylon thought itself impregnable; and new mystical Babylon thinks herself infallible and impregnable too; the only church, (if we will believe her), against whom the gates of hell shall not prevail.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-18.html. 1685.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

How much soever she glorified herself, and waxed wanton, so much give her of torment and mourning: for she saith in her heart, I sit a queen, and am no widow, and shall in no wise see mourning.

The first extended clause here is merely the reiteration, for emphasis, of what was said in Revelation 18:6.

For she saith in her heart ... Making such a boast to others was bad enough; but, "In her self-glorification, presumptuousness, and boastfulness, she had said it in her heart, which is even worse than saying it to others."[35]

I sit a queen ... Even the coinage of the pagan city proclaimed her as "the eternal city."[36] Lenski noted that we should not pass lightly over "I sit."[37] Where does the sitting take place? In the church of God, no less. See 2 Thessalonians 2:4 and our comments on that passage, also the "Excursus on the Man of Sin," my Commentary on 2Thessalonians, pp. 106-117.

And am no widow ... "It is curious that she should say, no widow."[38] God's entire true church is spiritually "widowed" in the absence of the Bridegroom from the earth; but this whore has picked up another in his stead to be the "head of the church," illegally taking the place of Christ who is the lawful and rightful head.

The meaning of this boast is that the harlot is certainly not looking to be overthrown. An arrogant confidence born of centuries of unjust domination has created within her the delusion that nothing can stop her. She will continue, so she believes, to be stronger and stronger; but there is no fall like that that comes to one who thinks that it cannot happen to him.

Arnold Toynbee's History of the great world civilizations shows that all great civilizations, including Rome, fell at the height of their power.[39]

[35] William Hendriksen, op. cit., p. 208.

[36] J. W. Roberts, op. cit., p. 150.

[37] R. C. H. Lenski, op. cit., p. 520.

[38] Leon Morris, op. cit., p. 217.

[39] James D. Strauss, op. cit., p. 224.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-18.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Luxurious living provides another reason for Babylon"s judgment. Her claims of superiority and self-sufficiency echo those of ancient Babylon (cf. Isaiah 47:7-9; Ezekiel 27:3; Ezekiel 28:2; Zephaniah 2:15). They also recall the words of the Laodicean church ( Revelation 3:17).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-18.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 18:7. In this verse the lex talionis is still administered both in extent and in severity. The humiliation of Babylon shall be the counterpart of her glorying. For she saith in her heart, I sit a queen, and am not a widow, and shall in no wise see mourning. The spirit of her glorying is expressed in three clauses, of which the second is peculiarly worthy of our notice. Commentators who see in Babylon the world-city are compelled to think of the beast and of the kings associated with it as the husband by the loss of whom Babylon had been reduced to widowhood. Such an interpretation is impossible. That husband had not been lost; the kings were not dead, they had only turned against her; while the words imply that she really is a widow although she does not feel it. If so, her boast can only be that she does not need the Lord for her husband. She has found another husband and many lovers. That she says these things ‘in her heart’ can hardly be intended to exclude the idea of loud boastings. The words rather lead us to think of the deep-seated nature of that spirit of glorying by which she is possessed (comp. Isaiah 47:7-8).

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-18.html. 1879-90.

Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

Many scriptures warn of the dangers of pride. (2 Samuel 22:28; Provers 11:2; 16:18; 29:23) The wicked city, like her ancient counterpart (Isaiah 47:7-8), boasted of her high position, the fact that she was no widow and would see no sorrow. Of course she was a queen of wickedness and, like allharlots, could not be a widow, but the end of her reigh and beginning of her sorrow was upon her.

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Hampton, Gary. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghc/revelation-18.html. 2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

hath. Omit.

glorified. Seep. 1511.

lived deliciously. See Revelation 18:3 above.

torment. Greek. basanismos. Here; verses: Revelation 18:10, Revelation 18:15. See Revelation 9:5.

I sit, &c. See Isaiah 47:8.

queen. A queen who is not a widow, implies a king-consort. Greek. "no widow" may be Figure of speech Tapeinosis. App-6.

no. App-105.

see. App-133.

no. App-105.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-18.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

How much she hath glorified herself, and lived deliciously, so much torment and sorrow give her: for she saith in her heart, I sit a queen, and am no widow, and shall see no sorrow.

How much - i:e., in proportion as.

Lived deliciously - luxuriously (note, Revelation 18:3).

Sorrow, [ penthos (Greek #3997)] - 'mourning,' as for a dead husband.

I sit. So Vulgate; but 'Aleph (') A B C prefix 'that.'

I ... am no widow - for the world-power is my husband.

And shall see no sorrow - `mourning.' 'I am (long) seated ... I am no widow ... I shall see no sorrow,' marks her unconcerned security as to the past, present, and future (Bengel). I shall never have to mourn as one bereft of husband. Babylon was queen of the East; so Rome is queen of the West: called on imperial coins 'the eternal city.' Ammian Marcellin says (Revelation 15:7), 'Babylon is a former Rome, and (papal) Rome a latter Babylon. Rome is a daughter of Babylon: by her, as by her mother, God has subdued the world under one sway' (Augustine). As the Jews' restoration did not take place until Babylon's fall, so (R. Kimchi on Obadiah) 'when Rome (Edom) shall be devastated, there shall be redemption to Israel.' Romish idolatries are stumblingblocks to the Jews' acceptance of Christianity.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-18.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(7) The thought of retribution is carried on in this verse. It should not read, “How much . . .,” but, In as many things as she glorified herself and luxuriated, so much give to her torment and grief; because in her heart she saith (comp. Psalms 49:11; Luke 14:30), I sit a queen, and am not a widow, and shall never see sorrow. The words are echoes of prophecies against old Babylon (Isaiah 47:7-9) and Tyre (Ezekiel 28:2).

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-18.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

How much she hath glorified herself, and lived deliciously, so much torment and sorrow give her: for she saith in her heart, I sit a queen, and am no widow, and shall see no sorrow.
much she
Isaiah 22:12-14; 47:1,2,7-9; Ezekiel 28:2-10; Zephaniah 2:15; 2 Thessalonians 2:4-8
I sit
Psalms 45:9; Jeremiah 13:18
no widow
Isaiah 47:7,8; Lamentations 1:1
Reciprocal: Judges 18:7 - how they;  1 Samuel 15:32 - Agag said;  Esther 6:10 - Make haste;  Job 20:22 - the fulness;  Job 36:11 - spend;  Proverbs 14:13 - GeneralEcclesiastes 2:1 - I will;  Isaiah 14:13 - thou;  Isaiah 32:13 - GeneralIsaiah 47:5 - for;  Jeremiah 48:7 - because;  Jeremiah 49:4 - gloriest;  Jeremiah 50:24 - and thou wast;  Jeremiah 51:57 - I will;  Lamentations 4:5 - that did;  Ezekiel 23:34 - and pluck;  Obadiah 1:3 - saith;  Zechariah 1:15 - GeneralMark 8:36 - what;  Luke 6:25 - mourn;  Luke 9:25 - what;  Luke 12:19 - take;  Luke 12:45 - to eat;  Luke 16:19 - clothed;  John 16:20 - but the;  Romans 11:20 - Be;  1 Corinthians 7:30 - that weep;  Philippians 3:19 - whose glory;  1 Thessalonians 5:3 - then;  1 Timothy 5:6 - she;  1 Timothy 6:17 - that they;  Hebrews 11:25 - the pleasures;  James 4:9 - let;  James 4:16 - GeneralJames 5:5 - have lived;  Revelation 17:4 - arrayed;  Revelation 18:9 - the kings

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-18.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

The leaders in Rome or Babylon had been living a selfish life at the expense of their helpless dupes. Now that they have been undeceived by the workers in the Reformation, they are urged to make their condemnation all the more severe upon her. A queen would be in good circumstances in that she would have one on whom to depend for support and would have no sorrow or anxiety.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-18.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 18:7

Revelation 18:7 How much she hath glorified herself, and lived deliciously, so much torment and sorrow give her: for she saith in her heart, I sit a queen, and am no widow, and shall see no sorrow.

How much she hath glorified her self, she saith, I sit a Queen.

She is Queen Regent, see Revelation 17:15-18. The Queen Mother, see Revelation 17:5 that great old scarlet whore, the Church of Rome; as old Babylon said, { Isaiah 47:1-9} etc. The remainder of this chapter is literal, and needs no exposition; it is so plain, that any intelligible person may run and read it. { Ezekiel 27:29-32} And all that handle the Oar, the mariners, and all the pilots of the sea, shall come down from their ships, they shall stand upon the land- And in their wailing they shall take up a lamentation for thee, and lament over thee, saying, What city is like Tyrus, like the destroyed in the midst of the sea. { Isaiah 34:8-10} For it is the day of the Lords vengeance, and the year of recompences for the controversies of Zion. And the streams thereof shall be turned into pitch, and the dust thereof into brimstone, and the land thereof shall become burning pitch. It shall not be quenched night nor day, the smoke thereof shall go up for ever: from generation to generation it shall lie waste, none shall pass through it for ever and ever. { Psalm 58:11} So that a man shall say, verily there is a reward for the righteous: verily he is a God that judgeth in the earth. { Jeremiah 51:47-64} Therefore behold, the days come, that I will do judgment upon the graven images of Babylon, and her whole land shall be confounded, and all her slain shall fall in the midst of her. Then the heaven, and the earth, and all that is therein, shall sing for Babylon: for the spoilers shall come unto her from the north, saith the Lord. As Babylon hath caused the slain of Israel to fall: so at Babylon shall fall the slain of all the earth-And it shall be when thou hast made an end of reading this book, that thou shalt bind a stone to it, and cast it into the midst of Euphrates: And thou shalt say, Thus shall Babylon sink, and shall not rise from the evil that I will bring upon her: and they shall be weary. Thus far are the words of Jeremiah. { Revelation 18:24} And in her was found the blood of prophets, and of saints, and of all that were slain upon the earth. God reveals and revengeth her blood guiltiness, and calls all his saints in heaven and earth to rejoice. { Revelation 18:20}

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-18.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 18:7. How much she has made herself glorious, and has been luxurious, so much torment and sorrow give her. For she says in her heart, I sit as queen, and am no widow, and I shall not see mourning. At the words, how much, etc., we are to supply, at the expense of others. The words, "for she says," &c., contain the reason for the heavy sentence against Babylon which was pronounced in the preceding verse. The reason is, the presumptuous security in which she trod beneath her feet all divine and human rights. All these words are still addressed to the ministers of the divine righteousness. But the address to them is only formally of moment. In substance the call, that they should render to her, is all one with, let it be rendered to her. The fundamental passage is Isaiah 47:8, where it is said of ancient Babylon, "who says in her heart, I am, and none else beside me; I shall not sit as a widow, neither shall I know the loss of children." By the widowhood is denoted not the loss of empire, but the state of desertion, helplessness, humiliation—comp. Lamentations 1:20; Baruch 4:12. Widows appear even in the law as representatives of personae miserabiles.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-18.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

7.I sit a queen—Quoted from Isaiah 47:7-8.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-18.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 18:7. It is probably at this point that the passage drifts over from the conception of a voice heard (Revelation 18:4) to that of direct utterance on the part of the prophet; unless we are to suppose that the voice speaks till the close of Revelation 18:20 (a similar instance in ch. 11). Imperial Rome is imperious and insolent; haughty self-confidence is the sin of the second Babylon as of the first (see Isaiah 47:5; Isaiah 47:7-8, imitated in this passage). Cf. (bef. 80 A.D.) Sibyll. ver. 173, where the impious and doomed city is upbraided for vaunting “I am by myself, and none shall overthrow me”. A similar charge of arrogance was brought by Ezekiel against the prince of Tyre (Ezekiel 28:2 f., cf. Eze 28:26, 27 throughout with the present passage), and by the Jewish author of Apoc. Bar. xii. 3 against Rome. To the Semitic as to the Hellenic conscience, the fall of a haughty spirit always afforded moral relief. Nothing so shocked the ancient conscience as overweening presumption in a state or an individual, which was certain ultimately to draw down upon itself the crashing anger of heaven.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-18.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

7. For she keeps telling herself. In the vision, Babylon is proud and arrogant. (Compare Isaiah 14:13-14; Isaiah 47:8; Jeremiah 50:29.)

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Revelation 18:7". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/revelation-18.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.