Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 19:11

And I saw heaven opened, and behold, a white horse, and He who sat on it is called Faithful and True, and in righteousness He judges and wages war.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Astronomy;   Colors;   Horse;   Jesus Continued;   Meteorology and Celestial Phenomena;   Vision;   Scofield Reference Index - Armageddon;   Day (of Christ);   Day (of Jehovah);   Thompson Chain Reference - Christ;   Divine;   Faithful, Christ;   Faithfulness;   Faithfulness-Unfaithfulness;   Glorified Christ, the;   Heaven;   Righteousness;   Righteousness-Unrighteousness;   The Topic Concordance - Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ;   Government;   Jesus Christ;   Judges;   Name;   War/weapons;   Word of God;   Wrath;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Excellency and Glory of Christ, the;   Prophecies Respecting Christ;   Righteousness;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Crown;   Jesus christ;   Prophecy, prophet;   Righteousness;   War;   Wrath;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Armageddon;   Color, Symbolic Meaning of;   Dead Sea Scrolls;   Faithfulness;   Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies;   Justice;   Nahum, Theology of;   War, Holy War;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Antichrist;   Armageddon;   Cherub (1);   Horse;   Joshua;   Revelation of John, the;   War;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Army;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Antichrist;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Angels;   Armour (2);   Ascension (2);   Colours;   Day of Christ;   Eschatology;   Faithfulness;   Horse;   Judgment Damnation;   Righteousness;   Supremacy;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Faithful,;   Horse;   Prophets, the;   Revelation, the;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Antichrist;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Horse;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Color;   Diadem;   Faithful;   Horse, White;   King, Christ as;   Peter, Simon;   Revelation of John:;   Truth;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

A white horse - This is an exhibition of the triumph of Christ after the destruction of his enemies. The white horse is the emblem of this, and Faithful and True are characters of Christ. See Revelation 3:14.

In righteousness he doth judge and make war - The wars which he wages are from no principle of ambition, lust of power, or extension of conquest and dominion; they are righteous in their principle and in their object. And this is perhaps what no earthly potentate could ever say.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-19.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And I saw heaven opened - He saw a new vision, as if an opening were made through the sky, and he was permitted to look into heaven. See the notes on Revelation 4:1.

And behold, a white horse - On the white horse as a symbol, see the notes on Revelation 6:2. He is here the symbol of the final victory that is to be obtained over the beast and the false prophet Revelation 19:20, and of the final triumph of the church.

And he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True - He is not designated here by his usual and real name, but by his attributes. There can be no doubt that the Messiah is intended, as he goes forth to the subjugation of the world to himself. The attributes here referred to - faithful and true - are especially appropriate, for they are not only strongly marked attributes of his character, but they would be particularly manifested in the events that are described. He would thus show that he was faithful - or worthy of the confidence of his church in delivering it from all its enemies; and true to all the promises that he has made to it.

And in righteousness he doth judge - All his acts of judgment in determining the destiny of people are righteous. See the notes on Isaiah 11:3-5.

And make war - That is, the war which he wages is not a war of ambition; it is not for the mere purpose of conquest; it is to save the righteous, and to punish the wicked.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-19.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And I saw heaven opened,.... This vision refers not to the same time the first seal does, Revelation 6:2 for though a white horse, with a rider on it, is seen here, as there; that respects the first times of the Gospel, this the latter part of the dispensation of it; nor to the war in heaven between Michael and the dragon, and their angels, Revelation 12:7 that issued in the downfall of Paganism in the Roman empire, this will issue in the downfall of the Papacy in it; nor to the personal coming of Christ to the last judgment, of which an account is given in the following chapter; but to the battle at Armageddon, to which the sixth vial is a preparation, and which is finished under the seventh, Revelation 16:13 and what is briefly hinted at there is at large related here; in which Christ, the General, and his armies, on the one hand, and the kings of the earth, with the beast and false prophet, and their armies, on the other hand, appear to give battle to each other: and the issue of the battle is particularly represented, in order to have a view of which, "John saw heaven opened": not literally, as at Christ's baptism, and at the stoning of Stephen, nor in a spiritual sense, by the blood of Christ, but visionally, as in Revelation 4:1 and since heaven, often in this book, signifies the church on earth, a more glorious and comfortable state of the church may be designed; when her gates shall be opened continually, and not shut day nor night, to receive the forces of the Gentiles, and their kings, Isaiah 60:15 such a state as is referred to in Revelation 11:19 to which visions this is contemporary; and it may denote a very glorious appearing of Christ, not in person, which will be after this, but in his kingdom and power, in defeating his enemies, and reigning spiritually with his saints: and it may also design the clear revelation and discerning John had of the following things:

and behold a white horse which, as in Revelation 6:2 may be a symbol of the Gospel, and Gospel ministers, as there in the former, here in the latter part of the Gospel dispensation; signified by a horse, to denote the swift progress of the Gospel in the latter day, the majesty, power, and authority with which it will come, bearing down all opposition made against it; and by a white horse, to express the purity of the Gospel, and of its preachers and professors, and the peace it publishes, and gives, and the joy it brings, and the triumphs that will attend it.

And he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True: that Christ is here meant, is evident from the description of his eyes, Revelation 19:12 being the same as in Revelation 1:14 and from his name, Revelation 19:13 which is the peculiar name of the Son of God, John 1:1 and he sits upon, and is bore by, and rides forth in the Gospel, and the ministry of it, with glory and majesty, and prosperously, Psalm 45:3 and the characters of faithful and true well agree with him; See Gill on Revelation 3:7. See Gill on Revelation 3:14. He is "faithful and true" to God, who appointed him a Leader and Commander of the people, and to them he is the Commander of: and these characters well suit him now, when he will accomplish all the glorious things spoken of the church, relating to her spiritual and happy state in the latter day, and serve greatly to recommend him as a General.

And in righteousness he doth judge and make war; which is to be understood not of the last judgment, though that will be executed in righteousness, and therefore is called the righteous judgment, yet in that day there will be no war, no opposition, the wicked will at once submit; but of Christ's judging of his people, and avenging their blood on their enemies, and the remainder of them among Papists, Pagans, and Mahometans; who will be gathered together at Armageddon in battle array against them, when there will be an utter discomfiture of them in righteous judgment; for as in times past the beast made war with the saints and witnesses, and overcame them, Christ will enable his people to make war with him and his accomplices, and overcome them, as the sequel of this vision shows, Christ being at the head of them, though not in person, yet in power.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-19.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

12 And I saw 13 heaven opened, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him [was] called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he doth judge and make war.

(12) The second part of this chapter (as I said in) {See (Revelation 19:1) } is of the victory gained by Christ against both the beasts: in which first Christ is described as one ready to fight, to the sixteenth verse (Revelation 19:12-16), then the battle is shown to begin, there to the eighteenth verse (Revelation 19:17-18), lastly is set forth the victory, to the end the chapter (Revelation 19:19-21). In this place the most excellent properties of Christ as our heavenly judge and avenger shine forth, according to his person, company, effects and names.

(13) Properties belonging to his person, that he is heavenly, judge, faithful, true, just, in this verse, knowing all things, ruling over all, to be known by no one, (Revelation 19:12), the triumpher and in essence, the Word of God, in (Revelation 19:13).

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-19.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him — identical with Revelation 6:2. Here as there he comes forth “conquering and to conquer.” Compare the ass-colt on which He rode into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:1-7). The horse was used for war: and here He is going forth to war with the beast. The ass is for peace. His riding on it into Jerusalem is an earnest of His reign in Jerusalem over the earth, as the Prince of peace, after all hostile powers have been overthrown. When the security of the world power, and the distress of the people of God, have reached the highest point, the Lord Jesus shall appear visibly from heaven to put an end to the whole course of the world, and establish His kingdom of glory. He comes to judge with vengeance the world power, and to bring to the Church redemption, transfiguration, and power over the world. Distinguish between this coming (Matthew 24:27, Matthew 24:29, Matthew 24:37, Matthew 24:39; Greek, “{parousia}”) and the end, or final judgment (Matthew 25:31; 1 Corinthians 15:23). Powerful natural phenomena shall accompany His advent [Auberlen].

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-19.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

The heaven opened (τον ουρανον ηνεωιγμενονton ouranon ēneōigmenon). Perfect passive participle (triple reduplication) of ανοιγωanoigō Accusative case after ειδονeidon So Ezekiel (Ezekiel 1:1) begins his prophecy. See also the baptism of Jesus (Matthew 3:16; Luke 3:21, but σχιζομενουςschizomenous in Mark 1:10). Jesus predicted the opened heavens to Nathanael (John 1:51). In Revelation 4:1 a door is opened in heaven, the sanctuary is opened (Revelation 11:19; Revelation 15:5), angels come out of heaven (Revelation 10:1; Revelation 14:17; Revelation 18:1), and sounds come from heaven (Revelation 19:1).

Behold, a white horse (ιδου ιππος λευκοςidou hippos leukos). Nominative case because of ιδουidou not ειδονeidon Cf. Revelation 6:2 for ιππος λευκοςhippos leukos The emblem of victory in both cases, but the riders are very different. Here it is the Messiah who is the Warrior, as is made plain by “Faithful and True” (πιστος και αλητινοςpistos kai alēthinos), epithets already applied to Christ (Revelation 1:5; Revelation 3:7, Revelation 3:14). Cf. also Revelation 22:6.

In righteousness he doth judge and make war (εν δικαιοσυνηι κρινει και πολεμειen dikaiosunēi krinei kai polemei). See Isaiah 11:3. The Messiah is both Judge and Warrior, but he does both in righteousness (Revelation 15:3; Revelation 16:5, Revelation 16:7; Revelation 19:2). He passes judgment on the beast (antichrist) and makes war on him. Satan had offered Christ a victory of compromise which was rejected.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-19.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

A white horse

Compare Revelation 6:2.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-19.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he doth judge and make war.

And I saw the heaven opened — This is a new and peculiar opening of it, in order to show the magnificent expedition of Christ and his attendants, against his great adversary.

And behold a white horse — Many little regarded Christ, when he came meek, "riding upon an ass;" but what will they say, when he goes forth upon his white horse, with the sword of his mouth? White - Such as generals use in solemn triumph.

And he that sitteth on him, called Faithful — In performing all his promises.

And True — In executing all his threatenings.

And in righteousness — With the utmost justice.

He judgeth and maketh war — Often the sentence and execution go together.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-19.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

For similar images and expressions denoting Christ, see Revelation 3:14,6:2.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/revelation-19.html. 1878.

Scofield's Reference Notes

saw heaven opened

The vision is of the departure from heaven of Christ and the saints and angels preparatory to the catastrophe in which Gentile world-power, headed up in the Beast, is smitten by the "stone cut out without hands". (Daniel 2:34); (Daniel 2:35).

white horse

Contrast (Revelation 6:2); (Psalms 45:4).

Contrast (Matthew 21:2-5).

Day of the Lord

(Day of Jehovah). (Isaiah 2:10-22); (Isaiah 4:1-6); (Isaiah 11:10-13); (Isaiah 13:9-16); (Isaiah 24:21-23); (Isaiah 26:20-21); (Isaiah 63:1-6); (Isaiah 66:15-24); (Revelation 19:11-21).

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Revelation 19:11". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/revelation-19.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

11 And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he doth judge and make war.

Ver. 11. And I saw heaven opened] i.e. He saw things done before his eyes, as it were; so do not we, but are left to conjectures. Here is showed, saith one, the foil of the beast, bearer up of the whore, and no question but now highly chafed with her fall. This is the last and noblest act of Christ’s riding, for the dragon and his vicars’ utter destruction. Thus he. Here is showed, saith another interpreter, in what state the Church shall be in, upon the ruin of Rome, even as people standing in arms under their General Christ Jesus for a time, till the last battle be fought, and the enemies destroyed.

Behold, a white horse] Christ riding as an Emperor triumphing, and as a righteous Judge, Psalms 9:8; Psalms 96:10; Psalms 96:13.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-19.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Revelation 19:11

Fighting for God.

I. If we are to contend earnestly with evil, we must ourselves hate it. To hate evil is not so easy as it once was. As people become civilised, and lives become comfortable, evil is cunning enough to veil its ugliest features, and to call in the aid of many powerful allies, such as good-nature, common-sense, charity, and even philosophy, to say a word on its behalf. Between them they contrive to produce a very lenient portrait of evil, and to represent it as an amiable weakness, or an irresistible temptation, or a conventional slip, or even an imperfect and undeveloped good. And the more we look on such kindly but really godless caricatures of evil, the harder it becomes for us to hate it. St. Paul's words seem exaggerated, "Abhor that which is evil; cleave to that which is good."

II. Note two of the main difficulties which are likely to damp our courage and make us only half-hearted in our contest with evil. There are, of course, many such, but I shall select only two. (1) We have read of that legendary "Knight of God," into whose lips the poet has put the noble words,

"My strength is as the strength often,

Because my heart is pure."

Alas! the sad reason why our strength is often little better than a coward's is because our heart is not pure. (2) The second obstacle is this: the fancy that we stand almost alone in our desire for a better state of things, and that the mass of those around us are either indifferent or hostile. Thus the enterprise will seem hopeless. Remember, God does not bid you succeed; He only bids you try. And all history tells us that all the best things that have ever been done in the way of moral reforms have been done by minorities, strength made perfect in weakness, the faith of a few triumphing over the stagnation or the opposition of numbers. This is the device, written in letters of gold, oftentimes in letters of blood, over the front of all great causes. "God loves," it has been said, "to build upon nothing."

H. M. Butler, Harrow Sermons, 2nd series, p. 266.


References: Revelation 19:11-16.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xxv., No. 1452; C. Kingsley, Westminster Sermons, p. 202. Revelation 19:12.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. v., No. 281; R. W. Dale, Christian World Pulpit, vol. iv., p. 353.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/revelation-19.html.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Here we have a new and fresh vision, in which St. John saw heaven opened, and Christ represented as a great and victorious general, marching forth with a glorious army for his church's enemies' full and final destruction. This great general is first described from the place whence he comes, namely, from heaven; he is no earthly prince or potentate, but an heavenly monarch.

Next he is said to sit on a white horse, denoting victory, prosperity, and success; He is called faithful, and true, and righteous, because faithful in all his promises, true in his threatenings, righteous in all his dispensations towards his enemies; he will do them no wrong.

Next, his eyes are said to be as a flame of fire: denoting his clear and piercing knowledge, and also his terror as a judge, his eyes being in wrath as a flame of fire, ready to consume his enemies.

And farther, to show his royal dignity, it is added, on his head were many crowns, which also denoted his many victories over his many and mighty enemies. And by the name which no man knew but himself, some understand the nature and essence, which is so incomprehensible and unsearchable, as that none but he who is true God is able to comprehend it fully, or reveal it perfectly. Others by his name understand his judgments and ways, by which he is known, as a man by his name.

Observe next, This great and mighty general is described from his vesture dipped in blood, which denotes the mighty overthrow of his enemies: the cruellest and proudest of them can expect nothing in the end from him, but extremity of wrath and deserved destruction, for they must all become his footstool.

And his name being called the word of God, speaks dread and terror to antichrist, who slanders, opposes, corrupts, and suppresses, and offers all manner of indignities to the word of God; exercises the utmost cruelties against the preachers and professors of it.

Observe farther, That after the description of this great and mighty general, follows next the description of his armies, his attendants and followers, namely, the holy angels and glorified saints, Revelation 19:14. these also ride upon white horses, as their general before them, and are clothed in fine linen, white and clean.

Behold the comely conformity, and purity, and holiness, between the general and his soldiers, between Christ and his followers; they both appear on white horses, suitable to one another. Christ will admit none to be his followers that are not like him.

Next we have the weapon described, Revelation 19:15. which Christ makes use of for the destruction of antichrist, and all his church's enemies; and that is, a sword, a sharp sword, the holy scriptures, particularly the threatenings of the word, with which he will smite all the wicked nations that side with antichrist against him and his kingdom; dealing with his enemies as men do with grapes gathered into a wine-press, which they can easily crush.

Lastly, He is described by a new name of royal dignity and supreme power, being called King of kings and Lord of lords. And this name is said to be written on his vesture and on his thigh, partly for perspicuity, that all might take notice of it; and partly for permanency, to show that as long as himself lasts, which is for ever, so long shall his kingdom and dominion over all endure.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/revelation-19.html. 1700-1703.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 19:11. (211) ἵππος λευκὸς, a white horse) Antithetical to ὄνον, Matthew 21— κρίνει, judges) Lange joins with this chapter many passages, even of the New Testament, concerning the coming of Christ in glory, concerning the resurrection of the dead, and the judgment. Comm. Apoc. f. 107, 108, 256–259. But there is in truth but one coming of Christ in glory, at the last day: of which, however, there is an illustrious and remarkable prelude in the destruction of the beast. See above on 2 Thessalonians 2 T. ii. pp. 333, 334, and Ord. Temp. p. 412 [Ed. II. p. 354]. And the sum of the testimony respecting the resurrection and the judgment has reference to the same last day.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-19.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The remaining part of this chapter is conceived more fully to open what shall come to pass under the sixth and seventh vials, mentioned Revelation 16:12,17, more especially the battle in Armageddon, mentioned there, Revelation 16:16. There mention was made only of the armies’ being gathered together; here it is more fully described. At the beginning of the gospel, (saith a late learned annotator), John saw only a door opened, Revelation 4:1. At the resurrection of the witnesses, he saw the temple opened, Revelation 11:19. Here, after the ruin of Babylon, he seeth

heaven opened.

And behold a white horse: John saw such a horse, Revelation 6:2. Dr. More observes, that the horse with his rider signifies rule; and the white colour, prosperity and success. It appears that the rider was Christ, because he is called

Faithful and True, which agrees with Revelation 1:5; and by the names in the following verses, Revelation 19:13,16, given to him.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-19.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

отверстое небо Тот, Кто вознесся на небо (Деян. 1:9-11) и был посажен одесную Отца (Евр. 8:1; 10:12; 1Пет. 3:22), придет, чтобы забрать землю у узурпатора и установить Свое Царство (5:1-10). Характер этого события показывает, насколько оно отличается от восхищения. При восхищении Христос встречает Своих в воздухе, а в этот раз Он приходит с ними на землю. При восхищении суда нет, все совершающееся сейчас – суд. До этого события уныние и тьма: померкшее солнце, погасшая луна, упавшие звезды, дым – затем молниеносная ослепляющая слава прихода Христа. Такие подробности не включены в описание вознесения или восхищения (Ин. 14:1-3; 1Фес. 4:13-18).

конь белый Во время торжественных процессий в Древнем Риме полководец-победитель обычно ехал на своем белом боевом коне по Священной дороге (Via Sacra) в храм Юпитера на Капитолийском холме. Во время первого пришествия Иисус уничиженно ехал на ослике (Зах. 9:9). В видении Иоанна Он изображается как Победитель на боевом коне, Который пришел наказать грешников, свергнуть антихриста, победить сатану и вернуть Себе владычество над землей (ср. 2Кор. 2:14).

Верный и Истинный Верный Своему слову, Иисус опять придет на землю (Мф. 24:27-31; см. пояснение к 3:14).

праведно судит См. 20:11-15; ср. Мф. 25:31 и послед.; Ин. 5:25-30; Деян. 17:31.

воинствует Это потрясающее слово, переведенное как «воинствует», появляется только здесь и в 2:16; оно исключительно точно описывает святой гнев Бога на нераскаявшихся грешников (ср. Пс. 7:13). Терпение Бога по отношению к непокорному грешному миру истощится.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-19.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Heaven opened; in token of still further communications which were to be made of the purposes of Christ. The final conflict here described seems to be identical with "the battle of that great day of God Almighty," chap Revelation 16:14. There the dragon, the beast, and the false prophet gather their hosts into the valley of Armageddon. Here the beast and the false prophet are taken and cast into the lake of fire; and then, chap Revelation 20:1-3, the dragon, who had instigated this war against Christ, is bound and cast into the bottomless pit for a thousand years. There also, as here, the conflict is immediately followed by the complete triumph of Christ and his reign over men. Compare chap Revelation 16:17; with chap Revelation 20:1-3.

A white horse; here, as in chap Revelation 6:2, the symbol of victory over his foes.

Faithful and True; he is Jesus Christ, "the faithful and true Witness." Chap Revelation 3:14.

He doth judge and make war; compare Isaiah 11:3-4, where the same attributes and works are ascribed to the Messiah.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-19.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And I saw the heaven opened; and behold, a white horse, and he that sat thereon called Faithful and True; and in righteousness he doth judge and make war.

A white horse, and he that sat thereon called Faithful and True ... This seems to be one of the few places in Revelation where all the opinions meld into one. This is a description of the Lord Jesus Christ. We also identify him with the rider of the white horse in the first seal (Revelation 6:2). It is objected that those seals are judgments; but what is the scene here if it is not a judgment, not merely a judgment, but the final and last judgment? The judgment in the seals (Revelation 6:2) was due to the preaching of the truth, an odor of life to some, death to others; and this judgment is the final and total execution of the judgment determined by the preaching of the gospel, which always results in the salvation of some and the rejection of others, and culminates in the wicked being overthrown as in this judgment.

The dark scenes of the balance of this chapter are objected to by many who find what they call their "Christian sensibilities" offended. They say this contradicts the conception of a gracious and merciful Christ; but such views are simply incorrect. "Everywhere in the New Testament, the element of victory through judgment is an inescapable aspect of Christ's total work."[32]

The warfare now to be described must be understood as that which is taking place between the hosts of Christ and Satan throughout the period of the world's existence.[33]

We reject the type of slander of this part of Revelation which declares that, "There is little or nothing that is specifically Christian in the whole section."[34] People with such views have merely overlooked the New Testament doctrine of judgment. Even Roberts overlooked the judgment here, thinking that John "expected a thousand year reign of the saints before the end of the world and the judgment."[35] He and so many others overlooked the recapitulatory nature of these chapters (Revelation 18; Revelation 19, and Revelation 20). It is true, of course, that the 1,000 years' reign comes before the judgment, as the recapitulation in the next chapter shows. But the judgment here in this chapter is exactly the same as the judgment there. "This chapter does not give us a picture of the millennial age"[36] in Any sense of its being any different from the rest of the Christian dispensation. The chapter is a view of the whole "millennial age," the "forty two months," the "one thousand two hundred and sixty days," etc., all of which are synonyms, symbolical representations of the total time between the two Advents of Christ, covering exactly the same time-period as that already covered in this prophecy, again, and again, and again.

Keep in mind that Revelation 18 gave the overthrow of the harlot; this chapter gives the overthrow of the beast (in his phase of the ten kings, the final phase, that of the eighth head); and the next chapter (Revelation 20) gives the overthrow of Satan (the dragon). These three: the dragon (Satan), the sea-beast (world persecuting governments), and the harlot (the land-beast, also the false prophet), are the three great enemies of Christianity depicted in Revelation. Their destruction in these three chapters occurs in exactly the reverse order of their appearance in the prophecy (beginning at Revelation 12:1); and despite their overthrow being related in separate chapters and separate recapitulations, "All three go down together:"[37] They are all three destroyed simultaneously in the final judgment, and shall continue "alive" and active until the very last day of time.

The circumstance that each is revealed in a separate vision should not lead us to think that there is an interval of centuries, either between their appearances (or their overthrow). In reality, all perish together by the Parousia of the Lamb.[38]

[32] George Eldon Ladd, op. cit., p. 151.

[33] A. Plummer, op. cit., p. 449.

[34] James Moffatt, op. cit., p. 466.

[35] J. W. Roberts, op. cit., p. 158.

[36] James William Russell, op. cit., p. 650.

[37] R. C. H. Lenski, op. cit., p. 547.

[38] R. C. H. Lenski, op. cit., p. 547,548.

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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-19.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

(3) The vision of Christ the conqueror--19:11-16.

After the symbolic Babylon, the Sodom-Egypt, apostate harlot-Jerusalem had been utterly overthrown; the temple demolished and Judaism removed; and the Jewish state terminated; all that Jerusalem represented no longer existent--then the visions of Revelation turned to the ‘victory of the church over heathenism. The visions of this conflict were presented in the language of high symbols, and there is danger of literalism in their application.

In verses eleven through fourteen, a name was given to the Rider of the white horse; he was called Faithful and True. He was the Christ himself, leading the procession of triumph, with a heavenly army consisting of the legion of martyrs and overcomers of persecution, to wage war against Caesar-worship and heathenism. With him in this glorious war of Christ against idolatry were the chosen faithful who shared the triumph of the procession of victory.

He was identified as the same Rider of the white horse in chapter 6:2; then going forth to conquer, but now in procession of victory over the emperial persecutors; to judge and make war against all heathenism. This war was to be waged by the sharp sword which proceeded out of his mouth--that is, a war on the heathen minions by the word of God, the two-edged sword of Hebrews 4:12, and the sword of the Spirit of Ephesians 6:17. His descriptions were put in symbols of a royal and ruling conqueror, which compared with the array of the Son of man in the midst of the seven churches in chapter 1:13-16. The vestures of the Rider were dipped in blood, an imagery of the battle with the persecuting beasts who had slain the martyrs and had shed the blood of the saints. With the heavenly army Christ, the Rider, subsequent to the extermination of Judaism, was seen marching against the strongholds of heathenism.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-19.html. 1966.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

John saw another scene in heaven (Gr. kai eidon, "And I saw"). He now saw heaven standing open (cf. Ezekiel 1:1), not just a door open ( Revelation 4:1) or the heavenly temple open ( Revelation 11:19). A white horse symbolizes victory over one"s enemies (cf. 2 Corinthians 2:14). Here John saw Christ rather than Antichrist ( Revelation 6:2) riding a white horse (cf. Isaiah 62:11). John described Him as Faithful (trustworthy) and True (righteous, the real Messiah; cf. Revelation 1:5; Revelation 3:7; Revelation 3:14; 3 Maccabees 2:11). The Antichist was unfaithful in that he broke his covenant with Israel, and he was untrue in that he deceived people. Jesus Christ came out of heaven to judge the beast and to make war with him on earth (cf. Isaiah 11:3-5).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-19.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 19:11. And I saw the heaven opened, and behold a white hone, and he that sat upon him, called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he doth judge and make war. It is the Lord Himself who comes to wind up the history of the world, to bring salvation to His own, and destruction to His enemies. The Heaven is opened, and a white horse appears, the same as that of chap. Revelation 6:2. He who then went forth ‘conquering and to conquer’ returns in triumph. His victory is won. In His own being He has proved Himself to be ‘faithful and true,’—‘faithful’ to all His promises, ‘true’ as the essence of all that is real and everlasting.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-19.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Behold a white horse. The titles and character given to him that sat on this white horse, shew that hereby was represented Jesus Christ, called also here the word of God, ver. 13; and ver. 16, and he hath on his garment and on his thigh written: King of kings and Lord of lords, &c. (Witham) --- And he that sat, &c. The heavens open and St. John sees Jesus Christ, the Son of God, descending, seated on a white horse. He is known by the peculiar appellations of faithful and true. Faithful, in protecting his servants; and true, by always keeping strictly true whatever he promises. (Pastorini)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/revelation-19.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

saw. App-133.

heaven = the heaven. See Revelation 3:12.

behold. App-133.

white horse. Contrast that and its rider of Revelation 6:2.

He That sat, &c. The prophecy in Zechariah 9:9 as to the Lord entering Jerusalem riding on an ass was fulfilled literally (Matthew 21:4-11); why then stumble, as do some, at the prediction here of "this same Jesus" riding on a "white horse"? Zechariah 9:9, Zechariah 9:10 takes in both comings. See also Psa 45.

upon him = thereon.

upon. App-104.

Faithful. App-150and App-175

True. App-175.

righteousness. App-191.

judge. App-122.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-19.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And I saw heaven opened and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him was called Faithful and And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he doth judge and make war.

Behold a white horse: and he that sat upon him. Identical with Revelation 6:2. He comes forth "conquering and to conquer." Compare the ass-colt on which He rode into Jerusalem. The horse was used for war: here He is going forth to war with the beast. The donkey, for peace. His riding on it into Jerusalem is an earnest of His reign in Jerusalem over the earth, as Prince of peace, after all hostile powers have been overthrown. When the security of the world-power and the distress of the people of God have reached their highest, the Lord Jesus shall appear from heaven to end the whole world-course, and establish His kingdom of glory. He comes to judge with vengeance the world-power, and bring to the Church redemption, transfiguration, and power over the world. Distinguish this coming (Matthew 24:27; Matthew 24:29; Matthew 24:37; Matthew 24:39 [ parousia (Greek #3952)]) from the end, or final judgment (Matthew 25:31; 1 Corinthians 15:24). Powerful natural phenomena shall accompany His advent (Auberlen).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-19.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(11) And I saw heaven opened . . .—Better, And I saw the heaven opened (not “opening,” but set open, already opened, as in Revelation 4:1), and behold a white horse, and (behold) one that sitteth upon him called Faithful and True, and in righteousness He judgeth and warreth. The description reminds us of the opening of the first seal. Again we have the white horse, and the rider. That early vision of a conquering Christ had been first a hope and then a despair, as age after age interposed its obstacles to the manifestation of the sons of God; but now, with added splendour, the vision is renewed: the hopes of the waiting shall not perish for ever. Once more the victorious rider appears, and His name dispels all fear, though the vision has been long in tarrying. At the end it speaks and does not tarry (Habakkuk 2:1-4), for He who rides upon the heavens, as it were upon a horse, has His name Faithful and True (Hebrews 10:23; Hebrews 10:36-38). This name combines two characteristics: fidelity to promises, trustworthiness; and the power to satisfy every legitimate desire which has been awakened in the hearts of His people; for in Him all hopes find repose, and every ideal is realised. He is further pictured as a warrior. This warrior bridegroom carries us back to Psalms 45, where a similar combination of marriage joy and martial triumph is found. Righteousness marks His progress in war, as faithfulness is manifested towards those who trust Him (Isaiah 11:4-5). Here is comfort on the threshold of a vision of deliverance. The book has shown us war, conflict, confusion: the passions of men surging against one another, and dashing like vain waves against God’s immutable laws; the world history is written in blood. We blame men for these cruel and desolating wars; but another question rises imperiously, Why does an all-good ruler allow these heart-breaking scenes? If earth’s groans pain and trouble us, do they not grieve Him? Where is He that He permits all this? The answer is, “In righteousness He judges and makes war.” The worked-out history of the world will make this plain. The righteousness of God is being revealed: all will see it one day; but now the just must live by faith in Him who is faithful and true, and who preserves the germ of all divine life in the history of the world.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-19.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he doth judge and make war.
heaven
4:1; 11:19; 15:5
a white
6:2; Zechariah 1:8
Faithful
1:5; 3:7,14; John 14:6
and in
15:3-7; Psalms 45:3-7; 50:6; 72:2-4; 96:13; 98:9; 99:4; Isaiah 11:3-5; 32:1; Isaiah 45:21; 63:1-5; Jeremiah 23:5,6; 33:15; Zechariah 9:9,10; Hebrews 7:1,2
Reciprocal: Exodus 15:3 - a man;  Numbers 23:24 - he shall;  Deuteronomy 9:3 - goeth over;  Deuteronomy 23:9 - GeneralJoshua 5:14 - but as captain;  Joshua 11:21 - Joshua destroyed;  Judges 1:2 - General2 Kings 6:17 - full of horses;  2 Chronicles 20:12 - wilt;  Psalm 24:8 - The Lord strong;  Psalm 45:4 - ride;  Psalm 45:6 - the sceptre;  Psalm 48:10 - thy right;  Psalm 51:4 - when;  Psalm 96:10 - judge;  Psalm 97:4 - the earth;  Psalm 98:1 - his right;  Psalm 110:5 - strike;  Psalm 110:6 - judge;  Psalm 145:17 - righteous;  Psalm 149:7 - GeneralProverbs 8:15 - decree;  Proverbs 16:12 - for;  Proverbs 31:9 - GeneralIsaiah 2:4 - And he;  Isaiah 9:7 - to establish it;  Isaiah 11:4 - But with;  Isaiah 13:4 - noise;  Isaiah 25:1 - thy counsels;  Isaiah 40:10 - his arm;  Isaiah 42:3 - he shall;  Isaiah 59:17 - he put on righteousness;  Isaiah 66:16 - GeneralEzekiel 1:1 - the heavens;  Ezekiel 21:27 - until;  Ezekiel 45:8 - and my princes;  Daniel 2:34 - which;  Daniel 7:22 - the Ancient;  Daniel 12:1 - the great;  Joel 3:12 - for;  Obadiah 1:21 - to judge;  Micah 4:3 - he shall judge;  Habakkuk 3:8 - ride;  Zechariah 6:3 - white;  Zechariah 6:13 - bear;  Matthew 12:20 - till;  John 1:51 - Hereafter;  John 8:16 - yet;  Acts 3:20 - GeneralActs 7:56 - I see;  Acts 10:11 - saw;  Romans 9:28 - in righteousness;  1 Corinthians 1:9 - God;  1 Corinthians 10:13 - but;  1 Corinthians 15:28 - all things;  2 Timothy 4:8 - the righteous;  Hebrews 1:13 - until;  1 Peter 2:23 - judgeth;  1 John 5:20 - him that;  Revelation 11:17 - thou hast;  Revelation 12:7 - war;  Revelation 19:9 - These;  Revelation 19:14 - white horses;  Revelation 19:19 - him;  Revelation 19:21 - the remnant;  Revelation 20:11 - I saw

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-19.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

HEAVEN OPENED

(Revelation 19:11-21).

INTRODUCTORY.

11-16. — "And I saw the Heaven opened, and behold a white horse, and One sitting on it (called) Faithful and True, and He judges, and makes war in righteousness. And His eyes are a flame of fire, and upon His head many diadems, having a Name written, which no one knows but Himself. And (He is) clothed with a garment dipped in blood; and His Name is called the Word of God. And the armies which (are) in the Heaven followed Him upon white horses, clad in white, pure, fine linen. And out of His mouth goes a sharp sword, that with it He might smite the nations; and He shall rule them with an iron rod; and He treads the winepress of the fury of the wrath of God the Almighty. And He has upon His garment and upon His thigh a Name written, King of kings, and Lord of lords." The remaining portion of the chapter to which we have given the general title, Heaven Opened, naturally divides into three parts: (1) the mighty Monarch and His victorious armies (vv. 11-16); (2) the call to the ravenous birds of prey to feed upon the slain, to partake of "the great supper of God" (vv. 17, 18); (3) the complete overthrow and destruction of the opposing army, the leaders consigned alive to the lake of fire, and their followers slain (vv. 19-21).

The special scene before us (vv. 11-16) is one of surpassing interest. We have had many and varied displays of Christ, for the whole book is more or less about Him, while all for us "upon whom the ends of the ages are come" (1 Corinthians 10:11, R.V.). But the present vision in its character and far-reaching results is second to none. It is unique. We have not here the Lamb enthroned as in Revelation 5:1-14, but the Warrior-King great in victorious, all-conquering power. Before Christ, as here described, the hosts of earth shall quail, and the stout hearts of the mighty stand appalled; but that sight of sights is a gladdening one to saints, for they know Him. The King and Judge is their everlasting Friend.

THE HEAVEN OPENED, AND A DOOR OPENED IN HEAVEN.

11. — "I saw the Heaven opened." This book is full of heavenly action. The scenes in Heaven as witnessed by the Seer are numerous and diversified. Voices heard, songs sung, angels and glorified saints seen, elders and the living creatures bowed in worship, thrones, crowns, robes, harps, books, and more, tell of the happiness and ceaseless activity of Heaven's inhabitants. Glimpses into Heaven we have had, but Heaven itself opened is a grand and overpowering sight. In the opening of the heavenly section of the book (Revelation 4:1-11) we read, "I saw, and behold, a door opened in Heaven." How much greater the astonishment of the Seer as he beholds, of course, in vision Heaven itself opened, not simply an opened door for admission. This action is in keeping with the magnificent pageant — the triumphal procession out of Heaven. A door opened in Heaven was for the Seer to pass in. Heaven opened was for the heavenly armies to pass out. Four times do we read in the New Testament of the heavens being opened (Matthew 3:16; John 1:51; Acts 7:56; Revelation 19:11), and on each occasion in connection with Christ. Two of these instances are past, two are future. His moral glory in humiliation called for it. His manifested glory above demands it. The holy Jerusalem is seen in a subsequent vision descending out of Heaven (Revelation 21:9), but it is not said Heaven is then opened for egress; it is opened once, and that is enough.

DESCRIPTION OF THE CONQUEROR AND HIS VICTORIOUS ARMY.

11. — The first part of the description beheld by the Seer was "a white horse," the symbol of victorious power.{*See notes on Revelation 6:2, page 148, and footnote.} The horseman who guides and controls bears the mystic name of "Faithful and True." Others may in measure be characterised by these qualities, but Christ alone can be so designated without qualification. He is in His Person and ways the perfect embodiment of these attributes.{*See notes on Revelation 15:3, and on Revelation 21:5.} Faithful in the performance of every promise and every threat, while every word and act bears the stamp of absolute truth.

11. — "He judges and makes war in righteousness." He comes to settle the destinies of the world for a thousand years. He is not only the mighty Warrior, but He judges the world as well as conquers it. God "hath appointed a day in which He will judge the world in righteousness by that Man Whom He hath ordained; whereof He hath given assurance unto all men in that He hath raised Him from the dead" (Acts 17:31). The appointed day is about to dawn, and the ordained Man is before us as the Commander of the hosts of Heaven. This is no iniquitous war; it is not one undertaken for love of conquest, nor for enlargement of territory. The judging is named before the warring, because all is done intelligently. The war and its issues are wisely directed. Righteousness is characteristic of Him as Judge and as Warrior.

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-19.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

White horse symbolises a war animal that is to engage in a war for purity. The rider was Christ who is described as Faithful and True. That is because the war in which He is about to engage (the Reformation) is a righteous one.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-19.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 19:11

Revelation 19:11 And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he doth judge and make war.

The great battle of Armageddon, { Revelation 16:16} is more fully described in the other part of this chapter, from this verse to the end thereof; amplified, first, by the preparation to it: And, secondly, by the event of it:

I saw Heaven opened

So he had done before, { Revelation 4:1} so did St. Stephen, { Acts 7:56}

And behold a white horse.

Such a vision of Christ John had. { Revelation 6:1-2} See the exposition. See KNOLLYS: Revelation 6:1 & See KNOLLYS: Revelation 6:2 There Christ came to conquer and convert sinners; here he comes to conquer and destroy his enemies, that would not have him to reign.

In righteousness he doth judge and make war.

That Isaiah, Christ doth enter into judgement against his enemies, and doth war against them, and destroy them.

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-19.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 19:11. And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse, and he that sat thereon was called faithful and true, and in righteousness he judges and makes war. Heaven is opened, so that the heavenly captain may descend from thence upon the earth with his hosts. In ch. Revelation 4:1, heaven was opened, that John might ascend to heaven, in order to learn there the secret things of God. What would the earth have been, and what would it become, if heaven had not been still further opened for both purposes! if it had no more been possible to have such goings up and comings down! The difference between it and hell would then have been abolished.

What comes from heaven against the earth, obtains an easy victory. Christ's kingdom is not of this world. He, therefore, is irresistible when he goes forth in defence of his kingdom. "The men of the earth" give way before him, who comes down from heaven, and are found lighter than a feather.

That he who sits upon the white horse is no other than Christ, is put beyond a doubt by the parallel passage, ch. Revelation 6:2, "And I saw, and behold a white horse, and he that sat on him had a bow, and a crown was given him, and he marched forth conquering, and that he might conquer." The white horse points here, as it did also there, at once to the glory of the person and to its manifestations. The white horse forms the contrast to the ass in Matthew 21. His first coming into the world was in the form of meekness, the second will be terrible, the cause of great pain to the ungodly. The white horse constantly appears anew, where the lowly form of the Saviour has been misapprehended and despised, where he has not been opened to when knocking at the door.

He, who sits upon the horse, is called faithful and true. The names of Christ in this vision are in all four. He is called faithful and true; he has a name written, which he alone knows; his name is called, the Word of God; he has a name written, King of kings, and Lord of lords. Before this sacred number four, the earth, whose signature is four, must tremble. That Christ is designated the true, raises him far above the level of humanity, it bespeaks almightiness and essential Godhead (comp. at ch. Revelation 3:7, Revelation 6:10, Revelation 15:3, Revelation 16:7). This holds also of the name faithful. Absolute faithfulness or credibility pre-supposes omnipotence. All men lie (Psalms 116:11); they all disappoint the confidence that is reposed in them, and leave in the lurch those who exercise it, (Psalms 62:9, Psalms 108:12). "It is better to trust in the Lord, than to put confidence in men," (Psalms 118:8). The Lord appears here, as in all Scripture, as alone faithful and worthy of confidence. Christ's faithfulness and truth take from his enemies all hope of victory, and from his people all fear of defeat. The words, "and in righteousness," etc., are not a component part of the name, but they continue further the description of the nature and action, that is involved in the name. He judges and wars in righteousness, whose property it is to give to every one his own; why, then, should his church despond! how should his enemies fear and tremble! Parallel is Psalms 45:4, where the divine hero goes forth, "on account of truth and meekness—righteousness," that is, in behalf of those, who possess these excellencies, for the protection and deliverance of the true, the meek, the righteous. The judging has precedence of the warring, to distinguish Christ's warring from that of men, which so often proceeds from irritated passion, and in this always has its foundation. Bengel:"In the world one is often a judge and no warrior, or a warrior and no judge. But Christ is a judge and a warrior."

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-19.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

11.Heaven opened—The seer, expecting the apocalyptic exhibition closed at Revelation 19:9, is magnificently surprised as he looks upwards and beholds the visible firmament opening, and through its portals the divine array descending to the earth.

White horse—Note on Revelation 6:2.

Faithful and True—Being the faithful impersonation of truth.

In righteousness—Thus he is living truth and righteousness. And in that cause does he judge and make war. Yes, he does judge, and is judge, in the broad Scripture sense of king; but this is not his judicial action. That appears in Revelation 20:11.

Make war—He so overrules the wars of the world as to bring out the ultimate triumph of right.

 

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-19.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 19:11. The military function of the messiah is known even to the philosophic Philo, who (de praem. et poen. 15–20) represents him incidentally as . The victory of messiah over the earthly foes of God’s kingdom meant the triumph of the kingdom, according to Jewish and Jewish Christian hopes; but owing to the increased spiritualisation of the latter, this nationalistic tradition was laid side by side with the wider hope of an eternal, universal judgment upon dead and living. The latter was originally independent ot the earlier view, which made the culmination of providence for Israel consist in the earthly subjugation of her foes. The prophet John, by dividing God’s foes into the two classes of Rome and Rome’s destroyers, preserves the archaic tradition and also finds room for the Gog and Magog tradition later on.

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-19.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

11. There was a white horse. The Rider is Christ at his Second Coming. [The white horse and Rider of the first seal are Christ conquering through his church in this world (see Revelation 6:2).]

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Revelation 19:11". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/revelation-19.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.