Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 19:13

He is clothed with a robe dipped in blood, and His name is called The Word of God.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Astronomy;   Horse;   Jesus Continued;   Meteorology and Celestial Phenomena;   Vision;   Word;   Scofield Reference Index - Armageddon;   Day (of Christ);   Day (of Jehovah);   Thompson Chain Reference - Names;   Titles and Names;   Vesture;   Word the, Christ as;   The Topic Concordance - Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ;   Government;   Jesus Christ;   Name;   War/weapons;   Word of God;   Wrath;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Titles and Names of Christ;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Word;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Crown;   Jesus christ;   Prophecy, prophet;   Revelation, book of;   War;   Word;   Wrath;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Armageddon;   Color, Symbolic Meaning of;   Dead Sea Scrolls;   Nahum, Theology of;   War, Holy War;   Word;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Word, the;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Antichrist;   Armageddon;   Cherub (1);   Joshua;   Name;   Revelation of John, the;   War;   Word, the;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Army;   Logos;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Antichrist;   Baptism;   John, Theology of;   Logos;   Name, Names;   Revelation, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Alpha and Omega (2);   Angels;   Ascension (2);   Baptism;   Blood;   Clothes;   Day of Christ;   Eschatology;   Isaiah ;   Logos;   Mediator;   Revelation, Book of;   Supremacy;   Trade and Commerce;   Trinity (2);   Word;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Horse;   Prophets, the;   Word, the;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Antichrist;   Names titles and offices of christ;   Word;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Apparel;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Dip;   Logos;   Peter, Simon;   Revelation of John:;   Word;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Revelation (Book of);  

Adam Clarke Commentary

He was clothed with a vesture dipped in blood - To show that he was just come from recent slaughter. The description is taken from Isaiah 63:2, Isaiah 63:3, where Judas Maccabeus, or some other conqueror, is described.

The Word of God - Written in the Targum, and in other Jewish writings, דיי מימרא meimera daiya, "the word of Jehovah;" by which they always mean a person, and not a word spoken. See the notes on John 1:1, etc.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-19.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And he was clothed with a vesture dipped in blood - Red, as if dipped in blood - emblem of slaughter. The original of this image is probably Isaiah 63:2-3. See the notes on that passage.

And his name is called The Word of God - The name which in Revelation 19:12, it is said that no one knew but he himself. This name is Ὁ λόγος τοῦ Θεοῦ Ho logos tou Theouor “the Logos of God.” That is, this is his unique name; a name which belongs only to him, and which distinguishes him from all other beings. The name “Logos,” as applicable to the Son of God, and expressive of his nature, is found in the New Testament only in the writings of John, and is used by him to denote the higher or divine nature of the Saviour. In regard to its meaning, and the reason why it is applied to him, see the notes on John 1:1. The reader also may consult, with great advantage, an article by Prof. Stuart in the Bibliotheca Sacra, vol. vii. pp. 16-31. The following may be some of the reasons why it is said Revelation 19:12 that no one understands this but he himself:

(1)No one but he can understand its full import, as it implies so high a knowledge of the nature of the Deity;

(2)no one but he can understand the relation which it supposes in regard to God, or the relation of the Son to the Father;

(3)no one but he can understand what is implied in it, regarded as the method in which God reveals himself to his creatures on earth;

(4)no one but he can understand what is implied in it in respect to the manner in which God makes himself known to other worlds.

It may be added, as a further illustration of this, that none of the attempts made to explain it have left the matter so that there are no questions unsolved which one would be glad to ask.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-19.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he was clothed with a vesture dipped in blood,.... Either in his own, by which he became the Saviour of his church and people; or else in the blood of his saints, he now comes to avenge; or rather in the blood of his enemies, with which he appears as stained, before the battle is fought, the victory being sure, and their slaughter unavoidable: the metaphor is taken from persons treading in a winepress, whose garments are stained with blood of grapes; see Revelation 19:15. Here may be also an allusion to the Roman general's vesture, which was sometimes purple or scarlet, in which he fought, as did LucullusF19Alex. ab Alex. Genial. Dier. l. 1. c. 20. .

And his name is called the Word of God; the name of Christ, often used by John in his Gospel, epistles, and in this book, John 1:1 1 John 1:1. Of the signification, reason, and import of this name; see Gill on John 1:1. The reason why he is called by it here may be partly to express his greatness, glory, and majesty, this being a name which principally belongs to him, is a person, as the Creator of all things, and as previous to his incarnation; and partly because all the promises of God in his word, and which are all yea, and amen in Christ, will be now shortly fulfilled.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-19.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

vesture dipped in bloodIsaiah 63:2 is alluded to here, and in Revelation 19:15, end. There the blood is not His own, but that of His foes. So here the blood on His “vesture,” reminding us of His own blood shed for even the ungodly who trample on it, is a premonition of the shedding of their blood in righteous retribution. He sheds the blood, not of the godly, as the harlot and beast did, but of the blood-stained ungodly, including them both.

The Word of God — who made the world, is He also who under the same character and attributes shall make it anew. His title, Son of God, is applicable in a lower sense, also to His people; but “the Word of God” indicates His incommunicable Godhead, joined to His manhood, which He shall then manifest in glory. “The Bride does not fear the Bridegroom; her love casteth out fear. She welcomes Him; she cannot be happy but at His side. The Lamb [Revelation 19:9, the aspect of Christ to His people at His coming] is the symbol of Christ in His gentleness. Who would be afraid of a lamb? Even a little child, instead of being scared, desires to caress it. There is nothing to make us afraid of God but sin, and Jesus is the Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world. What a fearful contrast is the aspect which He will wear towards His enemies! Not as the Bridegroom and the Lamb, but as the [avenging] judge and warrior stained in the blood of His enemies.”

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-19.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Arrayed (περιβεβλημενοςperibeblēmenos). Perfect passive participle of περιβαλλωperiballō to clothe, often in this book.

In a garment (ιματιονhimation). Accusative case after the passive participle περιβεβλημενοςperibeblēmenos (ρεραντισμενονrerantismenon). Perfect passive participle of ραντιζωrantizō in the predicate accusative case agreeing with ιματιονhimation A Q here read βεβαμμενονbebammenon (perfect passive participle of βαπτωbaptō to dip). Probably ρεραντισμενονrerantismenon (sprinkled) is correct, because the picture comes from Isaiah 63:3, where Aquila and Symmachus use ραντιζωrantizō The use of βεβαμμενονbebammenon (dipped) is a bolder figure and Charles considers it correct. In either case it is the blood of Christ‘s enemies with which his raiment (ιματιονhimation perhaps a χλαμυςchlamus Matthew 27:28, Matthew 27:31) is sprinkled or dipped as the case may be, not his own blood on Calvary (Revelation 1:5; Revelation 5:9; Revelation 7:14; Revelation 12:11), but proleptically and prophetically the blood of Christ‘s enemies. αιματιHaimati can be either locative case with βεβαμμενονbebammenon (dipped in blood) or instrumental with ρεραντισμενονrerantismenon (sprinkled with blood).

The Word of God (ο Λογος του τεουho Logos tou theou). Some scholars hold this addition inconsistent with Revelation 19:12, but it may be merely the explanation of the secret name or still another name besides that known only to himself. The personal use of the Logos applied to Christ occurs only in the Johannine writings unless that is the idea in Hebrews 4:12. In John 1:1, John 1:14 it is merely ο Λογοςho Logos (the Word), in 1 John 1:1 ο Λογος της ζωηςho Logos tēs zōēs (the Word of Life), while here it is ο Λογος του τεουho Logos tou theou (the Word of God), one of the strongest arguments for identity of authorship. The idiom here is one common in Luke and Paul for the teaching of Christ (Luke 5:1; Luke 8:11, etc.; 1 Corinthians 14:36; 2 Corinthians 2:17, etc.). Jesus is himself the final and perfect revelation of God to men (Hebrews 1:1.).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-19.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Dipped ( βεβαμμένον )

The readings differ; some giving ῥεραντισμένον sprinkledothers περιρεραμμένον sprinkledround. Rev., sprinkled. Compare Isaiah 63:2, Isaiah 63:3.

The Word of God ( ὁ Λόγος τοῦ Θεοῦ )

This name for our Lord is found in the New Testament only in the writings of John. It is one of the links which connects Revelation with John's other writings. Compare John 1:1-14; 1 John 1:1. Some object to this on the ground that, in the Gospel of John, the term is used absolutely, the Word, whereas here it is qualified, the Word of God, which the Evangelist nowhere employs, and in 1 John 1:1, the Word of life. But, as Alford observes: “It may be left to any fair-judging reader to decide whether it be not a far greater argument for identity that the remarkable designation ὁ Λόγος theWord is used, than for diversity, that, on the solemn occasion described in the Apocalypse, the hitherto unheard adjunct of God is added.” The idea of God which is represented here, underlies the absolute term the Word in John 1:1. It is further urged that in the Gospel ὁ Λόγος is applied to the prehistoric Christ, while in this passage it is applied to the historic Christ. But the name of the historic Christ is that referred to in Revelation 19:12, not in Revelation 19:13. It is the name “which no one knoweth but He Himself,” expressing the character of His whole redeeming work. The name in Revelation 19:13is that which belongs originally and essentially to Him.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-19.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he was clothed with a vesture dipped in blood: and his name is called The Word of God.

And he is clothed in a vesture dipped in blood — The blood of the enemies he hath already conquered. Isaiah 63:1, etc.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-19.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

A vesture dipped in blood; a common emblem of war. It is to denote, in this instance, the terrible destruction with which he should visit his enemies,--as is expressed distinctly Revelation 19:17-21.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/revelation-19.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

13 And he was clothed with a vesture dipped in blood: and his name is called The Word of God.

Ver. 13. Dipped in blood] In the blood of his enemies, as a victor returning from a huge slaughter. Caesar is said to have taken prisoner one million of men, and to have slain as many; Mahomet I (emperor of the Turks), to have been the death of 800,000 men; Seanderbeg, to have slain 800 Turks with his own hand. But our Conqueror shall outdo all these; when he shall tread them in his anger, and trample them in his fury; and their blood shall be sprinkled upon his garments, and he will stain all his raiment, Isaiah 63:3.

The word of God] John 1:1; John 1:7. Hereby it appears that this was John the Evangelist that wrote this book. Idiotismus Ioannis. (Pareus.)

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-19.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And he was clothed with a vesture dipped in blood; either to denote that he was he who redeemed us by his blood; or rather, to signify that he was now coming forth to shed the blood of his enemies, both in vindication of his own honour and glory, or of his people; in which notion it also agrees with Isaiah’s vision of him, Isaiah 63:1-3: Their blood shall be sprinkled upon my garments, and I will stain all my raiment.

And his name is called The Word of God:

See Poole on "John 1:1". He is also called the Word, Revelation 1:2, a name given him hardly by any except this apostle.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-19.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

одежду, обагренную кровью Это не результат Армагеддонской битвы, которая еще не началась до ст. 15. Забрызганные кровью одежды Христа символизируют великие битвы, в которых Он уже сразился против греха, сатаны и смерти. На Его одеждах пятна от крови его врагов.

Слово Только Иоанн пользуется этим именем для называния Господа (см.: во Вступлении: Автор и дата). В качестве Слова Иисус является образом невидимого Бога (Кол. 1:15), зримым выражением Его личности (Евр. 1:3) и последним полным откровением от Бога (Евр. 1:12).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-19.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

He was clothed with a vesture dipped in blood; compare Isaiah 63:1-3, and notes.

His name is-The Word of God; applied here, as in John 1:1, to the second person of the god-head.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-19.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And he is arrayed in a garment sprinkled with blood: and his name is called the Word of God.

Garment sprinkled with blood ... The imagery of this is thought to reflect the figure of the winepress in Isaiah 63, but there the blood was the blood of the Lord's enemies. As Caird pointed out, "The Rider's garment is already soaked in blood before the battle begins."[41] Some point out that Christ has already won many victories before the one pointed out here; but we seem to be compelled to seek the meaning symbolized by the bloodstains in that eternal victory of the Cross, where the enabling victory of all that came afterwards was achieved. "His garment is dipped in blood because Christ shed his blood for mankind."[42]

And his name is called the Word of God ... "This is a title of Christ used only by the apostle John (John 1:1,14,1 John 1:1,5:7)."[43] The apostle is thus linked with all three writings.

[41] G. B. Caird, The Revelation of St. John the Divine (New York: Harper and Row, 1966), p. 242.

[42] E. M. Zerr, op. cit., p. 340.

[43] Charles Caldwell Ryrie, op. cit., p. 112.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-19.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

In verse thirteen, the Rider was called by a third name --The Word of God. The Word was not a name without significance. The same John of the apocalypse referred to the Son of God as the Word in the gospel of John l:1-14. The word is the vehicle of conveying thoughts--and Jesus Christ was the full and complete expression of God's will to man; the beginning and the end of all revelation; hence, his title The Word. The name The Word Of God, signifies the armament of the warfare in which he was in this vision to engage--it was the conflict of Christianity with heathenism, and the truth was the weapon against all error.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-19.html. 1966.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The blood on His robe is probably the blood of his enemies, in view of the context (cf. Isaiah 63:2-3). John did not see Christ as the redeemer in this vision but as the warrior and judge. As many of the symbols in this passage, this one is also proleptic, anticipating His victory. The "Word of God" is a familiar title signifying that He is the expression of God"s mind and heart ( Isaiah 49:2; John 1:1; John 1:14; cf. 1 John 1:1; Hebrews 1:1). This "word" includes prophecies about God"s purposes ( Revelation 19:9; Revelation 1:2; Revelation 17:17). It is the same "word" that brought the worlds into existence as God"s active agent ( John 1:3; cf. Genesis 1:3; Genesis 1:6; Genesis 1:9; Psalm 33:6; Hebrews 4:12). As a title in Revelation, "Word of God" emphasizes the authoritative declaration that results in the destruction of God"s enemies rather than the self-revelation of God. [Note: Mounce, p345.]

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-19.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 19:13. And he is arrayed in a garment sprinkled with blood, and his name is called The Word of God. The idea is taken from Isaiah 63:2-3, and is therefore that of a garment sprinkled not with the Warrior’s own blood, but with the blood of His enemies. ‘Is called,’ i.e is, and has been always, called. The resemblance to John 1:1 and 1 John 1:1 need not be enlarged on.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-19.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Sprinkled with blood, &c. Which betokens the carnage made among his enemies.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/revelation-19.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

dipped = dyed, or stained. Greek. bapto, as Luke 16:24. John 13:26. Some texts read "sprinkled", Greek. rhantizo. See the word in Hebrews 9:13.

in = with. No preposition. Compare Isaiah 9:5; Isaiah 63:1-6.

called. If the comma is after "called", as in some Bibles, it would mean"announced" or "called", with inverts: if omitted, it is descriptive without inverts.

Word. App-121.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-19.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he was clothed with a vesture dipped in blood: and his name is called The Word of God.

Vesture dipped in blood - (Isaiah 63:2 : cf. Revelation 19:15, end.) The blood there is not His own, but that of His foes. Here the blood on His "vesture," reminding us of His own blood, shed for even the ungodly who trample on it, prefigures the shedding of their blood in retribution: not that of the godly, as the harlot and beast shed, but of the blood-stained ungodly, including them both.

The Word of God - who made the world, is He who, under the same character, shall make it anew. Son of God is applicable, in a lower sense, also to His people; but "the Word of God" indicates His incommunicable Godhead, which, joined to His manhood, He shall manifest in glory. 'The Bride does not fear the Bridegroom: love casteth out fear: she welcomes Him: she cannot be happy but at His side. The Lamb (Revelation 19:9) is the symbol of His gentleness. Even a little child, instead of being scared by a lamb, caresses it. There is nothing to make us afraid of God but sin: and Jesus is the Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world. What a fearful contrast is the aspect He will wear toward His enemies! Not as the Bridegroom and Lamb, but as the Judge and Warrior stained in the blood of His enemies.'

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-19.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he was clothed with a vesture dipped in blood: and his name is called The Word of God.
clothed
14:20; Psalms 58:10; Isaiah 9:5; 34:3-8; 63:1-6
The
John 1:1,14; 1 John 1:1; 5:7
Reciprocal: Deuteronomy 33:7 - let his hands;  Psalm 68:11 - company;  Isaiah 63:3 - trodden;  Ezekiel 30:3 - the time;  Ezekiel 34:24 - a prince;  Daniel 8:11 - the prince;  Micah 2:13 - their;  Micah 5:9 - hand;  Zechariah 9:15 - they shall devour;  Zechariah 10:4 - of him came forth;  Zechariah 10:5 - because;  Matthew 17:2 - his face;  Ephesians 1:21 - every;  James 2:7 - worthy;  Revelation 2:17 - a new;  Revelation 6:15 - the kings;  Revelation 19:16 - on his vesture

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-19.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 19:13. — "Clothed with a garment dipped in blood."{*It seems absurd to apply the "garment dipped in blood" to the blood of the Cross, as many do. The Lord is here viewed on a mission of judgment, not one of grace. The blood is not His own, but that of His enemies. The context clearly determines the sense.} This striking and impressive figure proclaims His vengeance in judicial dealing with the opposing hosts of apostate Europe who have come out to do battle with the Lamb. In Isaiah 63:1-4 we witness the triumphant return from the land of Edom, and from its capital city Bozrah, of the Lord with vengeance in His heart and His garments and vesture stained with the blood of His enemies, but here His garment dipped in blood is witnessed ere He enters on the conflict, a sure token that righteous vengeance shall be meted out to the full upon the gathered hosts under their two great chiefs, the Beast and the False Prophet,

13. — "His Name is called the Word of God." Of the eight sacred writers of the New Testament, John is the only one who applies this title to Christ. As the Word He represents and expresses God in His Being, character, and works. He is "The Word of Life" (1 John 1:1), as being in His Person and ways its living embodiment. He is termed "The Word of God," as perfectly expressing Him in judgment. As the WORD He has personal, independent, eternal existence (John 1:1-2); and as the WORD He is the maker of all things (v. 3). He is the Revealer of God, the ONE Who makes Him known. Our words ought to be the exact expression of what we are; the words of Christ were the absolute expression of what He ever is (John 8:25). As the WORD He reveals God in His essential nature as light and love, and as the "only begotten Son" He declares the Father. The first without the second would have left a huge blank, for the heart craves for a known and enjoyed relationship. God is our Father.

The title here used of Christ has peculiar significance in this connection. It is God Who is here seen roused to action. His very nature demands the judgment of those who on earth madly attempt to thwart His purpose to set His Son as King on Mount Zion and put into His hands earth's government. Christ, "The Word of God," is the absolute expression of God in the scene of judgment about to take place.

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-19.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Vesture dipped in blood is because Christ shed his blood for the sake of mankind, The Word of God is the name which all men can read and hence is not a secret, but they cannot realize what it means unless they appropriate that name to themselves by wholehearted obedience to its commandments. (See the name at John 1:1.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-19.html. 1952.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 19:13. And he is clothed with a garment dipt in blood, and his name was called[Note: The reading that is by much the best supported is καὶ κέ κληται τὸ ὄ νομα αὐ τοῦ; but Luther followed the reading καλεῖ ται. The perfect indicates that the name was even now an old one.] THE WORD OF GOD. The garment dipt in blood points to Isaiah 63:1-3, comp. here ch. Revelation 14:20. The blood, according to this passage, which is also alluded to in Revelation 19:15, is that of the enemies of God's people. The divine hero has already vanquished six phases of the ungodly power of the world, and has thereby given a sure pledge of the destruction of the seventh, against which he now goes forth. Bengel: "All his enemies must fall before him, and contribute to the renown of his might. Thus they still yield some profit." The name, "the Word of God,"[Note: There can be no doubt that we should render the name so. For λό γος τοῦ θεοῦ, whenever it occurs besides in the New Testament, means "the Word of God," and especially does so in the Apocalypse; comp. ch. 1:2, 9, 6:9, 20:4.] a must be used here with reference to the clothing. Otherwise Revelation 19:14 is incomprehensible. The transition from Christ to his army is there made through the medium of the clothing; and the statement respecting his name here cannot interrupt this connection; it can only contain what must serve for an explanation of the clothing. Now a bridge between the clothing and the name is supplied by Hebrews 4:12, "For the Word of God is quick and powerful, and sharper than a two-edged sword, and pierces even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and joints and marrow;" comp. in regard to the passage on ch. Revelation 1:16. By this the name appears as the interpretation of the apparel. To both the destroying character is common; both announce Christ as the mighty warrior, whom nothing of a created nature is able to oppose. What the Word of God is able to accomplish is shewn by the first chapter of sacred Scripture. By it heaven and earth were called into being (Psalms 33:6). If Christ is the personal Word of God—if everything, which else is called God's word, is but a single fragment of his nature—how should it ever be imagined that anything created could possibly stand before him? At the terrible sound of this name the ten kings must disperse like light froth. Bengel: "It is not said here, His name is called Jesus; for he manifests himself here, not as the Saviour of his people, but as the destroyer of his enemies. He will, therefore, be called here by that name, which is older than the name Jesus. The name Jesus especially unfolds his grace, and the name, the Word of God, his majesty. How deep must that, which is indicated by this name, lie in the unsearchable Godhead? A man's word is not only that which he expresses with his lips, and causes to be heard by the ear, but that also which he has within himself in his mind, and produces in his thoughts. If this internal word did not exist, it could not be brought forth into any form of speech or utterance. If even man's word is thus inward, how profound must be the seat of God's word, beyond any comprehension of ours, and what emotions should it stir, as often as it is declared, in respect to the creation or to the other works and witnesses of God, God speaks, the Lord testifies, etc. Against him, whose name is the Word of God, all his enemies, and in particular the beast, are but as stubble to the fire. With the spirit or breath of his lips he will slay the wicked, Isaiah 11:4. And no sinner or liar can anywhere stand before him." We are not, with De Wette, to understand by the Word of God him "who has revealed the Word of God, and indeed first as doctrine, then as prophecy."For in that case this name would be appropriated to Christ as the most perfect teacher. But it is against the character of this whole section, in which only a polemical name suits one that threatens destruction; also against the connection with what immediately precedes, and against John 1 (Vitringa: Id vero aliennm est ab oratione Johannis, qui τὸ ν λό γον jam ante condita saecula ait fuisse in sinu patris et apud patrem). By the name of the Word of God Christ appears in the writings of John only here, in John 1 of his Gospel, and in the beginning of his first epistle. The composition of the Apocalypse by St John derives no small support from this, and all attempts have been in vain to set it aside. Some have sought to distinguish between the use of the expression here and in the other writings of John, by alleging that here the Logos or Word of God is spoken of, as if there also the Word could be any thing but the Word of God, and as if here that were not indispensable, which is there supplied by the connection. "The name (writes Köslin, p. 184) is primarily ascribed to him only in his exalted state, and now indeed first there, and inasmuch as he comes down to the earth in the capacity of an avenging judge." As if Christ could become the Word of God in the course of time; as if the name itself did not point to a necessity in the divine nature existing even from eternity; as if Christ, because he is the Word of God, and, inasmuch as he is so, must not have been in the beginning with God! Christ is not the Word of God as the one, "who renders the divine will efficient outwardly or upon the earth," but because he is the Word of God he does this also among other things, he throws down the kings of the earth with that same omnipotence by which he originally called the earth into existence. John, Lücke conceives, does not call the "historical Christ" simpliciter the Word, as if the name here did not, precisely as the name Michael, in ch. 12, designate Christ in respect to his divine nature, in which alone there was to be found the security for his last victory over an ungodly world. The allegation, besides, that the expression is here "copied, not that originally of John," has been already disproved, by the consideration that the name of the Word of God here, though used essentially in the same signification as in the Gospel and the first epistle of John, is still employed in a quite peculiar and original respect. It would never have occurred to an imitator to serve himself of such an epithet as a hammer, wherewith to break in pieces the rock of the enemies of God's kingdom. That this was by no means an obvious thought is evident from the difficulty it has occasioned to expositors.

If Christ is the living Word of God, then all particular words of God must be spoken through his mediation, nor can there be any word of God which is not also a testimony of Jesus Christ, nor again a testimony of Christ, which is not a word of God (ch. Revelation 1:9, Revelation 20:4; John 14:24).

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-19.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13.A vesture dipped in blood—The allusion may be to Isaiah 63:1-2, where a warrior comes from Bozrah, with garments “dyed,” that is, “sprinkled,” with blood. But here the word dipt, , suggests that there may be an allusion to his own atoning blood. This view lies in close connexion with his gospel name next given, and with the white raiment of the armies, next verse.

His name—Known to the world as his gospel name.

Word of God—The incarnate expression to men of the divine nature. Hence a name of truth, of revelation, and of salvation. And so our John says in his Gospel, Revelation 1:14, “The Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us’ full of grace and truth.”

The armies— Namely, of martyred, disembodied spirits; the souls once under the altar, Revelation 6:9-11; then, on Mount Zion, with the Lamb, Revelation 14:1-5: next, here; and finally, as the souls of Revelation 20:4.

Fine linen—The righteousness of the saints, Revelation 19:18.

White—The leader is arrayed in red; the armies are in white. They are whitened by his crimson. They bear no carnal armour; they are the white warriors for purity and peace.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-19.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 19:13. “Dipped in blood” (i.e., the blood of his foes): from the “crimsoned garments” of Yahveh in Isaiah 63.; cf. also Revelation 19:15 with “I have trodden the wine-press.’ Yea, I trod them in mine anger ( ), and trampled them in my fury,” etc. Add Targ. Palest, on Genesis 49:11, “How beauteous is the King Messiah! Binding his loins and going forth to war against them that hate him, he will slay kings with princes, and make the rivers red with the blood of their slain, and his hills white with the fat of their mighty ones, his garments will be dipped in blood, and he himself like the juice of the wine-press.” The secret name denotes his superiority to all appeals; it indicates that the awful and punitive vigour of his enterprise made him impervious to the invocations of men. This is no Logos who dwells among men to give light and life; it is a stern, militant, figure of vengeance attacking the rebellious. Hence his name is mysterious; for “the identity, or at least the close connection between a thing and its name, not only makes the utterance of a holy name an invocation which insures the actual presence of the deity invoked, it also makes the holy name too sacred for common use or even for use at all” (Jevons’ Introd. Hist. Relig. 361). The passage reflects certain phases of later messianic belief in Judaism, which had been tinged by the Babylonian myth of Marduk, Ea’s victorious son, to whom divine authority was entrusted. Marduk’s triumph was explained by Babylonian theologians as caused by the transference to him of the divine Name (so Michael, En. 69:14). 13b may be a Johannine gloss upon the unknown name of Revelation 19:12 (cf.Philippians 2:9-10), under the influence of passages like Hebrews 4:15, Sap. 18. (“Thine all-powerful Logos leapt from heaven out of the royal throne, as a stern warrior into the midst of the doomed land, bearing the sharp sword of Thine unfeigned commandment”), and Enoch xc. 38 (cp. however Beer, ad loc).— , perf. of existing state, “the past action of which it is the result being left out of thought” (Burton, 75). If the above explanation of the mysterious name be correct, the author’s idea was evidently forgotten or ignored by some later editor or copyist of the Johannine school, who inserted this gloss in order to clear up the obscure reference, and at the same time to bring forward the transcendent name widely appropriated by that school for Christ in a pacific and religious sense (so nearly all critical editors). In any case the two conceptions of the Apocalypse and the Fourth gospel have little or nothing in common except the word. But the introduction of this apparently illogical sequence between 12 and 13 might be justified in part by E. B. D. 94, “I am he that cometh forth, advancing, whose name is unknown; I am Yesterday, and Seer of millions of years is my name”. The application of such titles to Jesus certainly gives the impression that these high, honourable predicates are “not yet joined to his person with any intrinsic and essential unity” (Baur); they are rather due to the feeling that “Christ must have a position adequate to the great expectations concerning the last things, of which he is the chief subject”. But their introduction is due to the semi-Christianised messianic conceptions and the divine categories by which the writer is attempting to interpret his experience of Jesus. Backwards and forwards, as pre-existent and future, the redeemer is magnified for the prophet’s consciousness.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 19:13". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-19.html. 1897-1910.