Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 21:25

In the daytime (for there will be no night there) its gates will never be closed;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church;   Gates;   Heaven;   Jerusalem;   Night;   Readings, Select;   Thompson Chain Reference - Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   Night;   The Topic Concordance - Jerusalem;   Name;   Newness;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Gate;   Jerusalem;   Light;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Book of life;   City;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Temple;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Light;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Heaven;   Heavenly City, the;   Night;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Day and Night;   Door;   Gate;   Gate (2);   Glory;   New Jerusalem;   Night (2);   Presence (2);   Star (2);   Tree of Life;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Gate;   Lamb;   Night;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Gareb;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Night;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Night;   Revelation of John:;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for April 13;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The gates of it shall not be shut at all - The Christian Church shall ever stand open to receive sinners of all sorts, degrees, and nations.

There shall be no night there - No more idolatry, no intellectual darkness; the Scriptures shall be everywhere read, the pure word everywhere preached, and the Spirit of God shall shine and work in every heart.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-21.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And the gates of it shall not be shut at all by day - It shall be constantly open, allowing free ingress and egress to all who reside there. The language is derived from Isaiah 60:11. See the notes on that place. Applied to the future state of the blessed, it would seem to mean, that while this will be their permanent abode, yet that the dwellers there will not be prisoners. The universe will be open to them. They will be permitted to go forth and visit every world, and survey the works of God in all parts of his dominions.

For there shall be no night there - It shall be all day; all unclouded splendor. When, therefore, it is said that the gates should not be “shut by day,” it means that they would never be shut. When it is said that there would be no night there, it is, undoubtedly, to be taken as meaning that there would be no literal darkness, and nothing of which night is the emblem: no calamity, no sorrow, no bereavement, no darkened windows on account of the loss of friends and kindred. Compare the notes on Revelation 21:4.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-21.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Revelation 21:25

No night there.

The everlasting day

I. No natural night there. The large portion of our existence that sleep now consumes will be added to our peaceful, our blissful occupations.

II. No night of sin there.

III. No night of suffering there.

IV. No night of ignorance there.

V. No night of infirmities there.

VI. No night of mysterious providences there.

VII. No night of hindered prayers there.

VIII. No night of disappointed expectations there.

IX. No night of separation there.

X. No night of temptation there. (T. Nunns, M. A.)

No night there

In looking at the emblems employed in the Word of God, you cannot fail to be impressed with their simplicity as well as their beauty. Night is one of these.

1. It is the season of repose.

2. It is the time of evil--the season chosen for the performance of deeds of darkness and of sin.

3. And it is the time of fear. Yet notwithstanding all this I praise God for the night.

4. Night is suggestive of sorrow. This is the inevitable lot of the good on earth. But “there shall be no night” of sorrow “there!” No tears shall be shed, no hopes shall be frustrated, no disappointments felt, no friends removed, no graves opened. Night, as we have seen, is associated with deeds of darkness. And hence, when it is affirmed of the heavenly state that “there shall be no night there,” we are reminded of the perfect purity of our eternal home. Further, night is associated with weariness and fatigue. To affirm, therefore, of the heavenly world that there shall be no night there, is to declare that weariness and fatigue shall be unknown. One of the most difficult questions is that of the exact nature of the glorified body the redeemed will possess. And then, night is associated with obscurity. Its shades conceal much from our vision, and hence it has ever been regarded as an appropriate emblem of mental obscurity. Mystery surrounds us on every hand. Questions are continually arising to which we can return no complete answer. Now it is night with us. The unclouded day is yonder. (S. D. Hillman, B. A.)

No night there

I. The absence of night in the glorified church implies that there will be no sin there.

II. The absence of night implies there shall be no ignorance there

III. The absence of night implies there shall be no weariness there. Here God’s people are wearied with labours.

IV. The absence of night implies that there shall be no change there.

V. The absence of night implies that there shall be no death there. (B. W. Bucke, M. A.)

The happiness of heaven

I. The import of the representation by which this state is here distinguished.

1. Among the mansions of the blessed, there shall be no fatigue, no tendency to lassitude, and no reason for repose.

2. There shall be no hostile intrusion there; there is no reason for precaution.

3. There is no impurity and no sin.

4. But night is a season of privation; and when we are told of heaven as a state where no privation shall be, we are well reminded that no night shall be there. Do you speak of privation of society? In heaven you will have delightful and hallowed fellowship. Do you speak of privation of knowledge? In heaven, illumination will be poured upon our faculties to the utmost extent which those faculties can, by possibility, bear. Do you speak of privation of happiness? In heaven, perturbation and pain, and fear, and distress, will be removed for ever.

5. “No more death”--“no more death” to our persons: “for this corruptible shall put on incorruption.” “No more death” to our happiness; “no more death” to our attainments; “no more death” to our joy. All unchangeable, and all imperishable, and all for ever!

II. The conclusions which our contemplations of the heavenly state under this representation ought forcibly to impress upon our minds.

1. Our contemplations ought to induce preparation.

2. Our contemplations of the heavenly state ought to induce gratitude. You were the slave led captive by the devil at his will, and now have been brought into the glorious liberty of the sons of God--a liberty which is to be consummated in the skies.

3. These contemplations of the heavenly state should induce desire. And truly there is nothing--if we are preparing for such scenes as those which have now been laid before you--there is nothing which should keep your desires from heaven. (J. Parsons.)

Heaven without night

1. We are wont to associate with night the idea of weariness. Sweet to the myriad toilers in the world’s vast workshop is the coming of the still evening hour, when the tasks of day are laid aside, and tired limbs and overwrought brains draw refreshment from slumber. So benign is this provision that Scripture has included it among the special acts of Divine goodness, in the beautiful saying, “He giveth His beloved sleep.” Now, as this arrangement is not found in heaven, the inference is obvious that the denizens of that bright realm do not require its operation, and are so constituted as to be inaccessible to fatigue from any intensity or duration of employment.

2. Night is the symbol of ignorance. How often do the Sacred Writers represent the intellectual and moral blindness of men under the figure of darkness! Thus Job, describing the errors and follies of the devotees of human wisdom, says, “They meet with darkness in the daytime, and grope at noonday as in the night.” And the fearful ignorance of God and of truth, which overspread the world at the period of the Redeemer’s advent, is pourtrayed by the graphic declaration, “Darkness covered the earth, and gross darkness the people.” In this emblematic sense, a deep and cloudy night stretches over the sphere which we now inhabit. How imperfect are our faculties! How narrow the limits of our knowledge! How obscure and uncertain our researches! What barriers of gloom and mystery meet us on whatever side we attempt to push our investigations! But in heaven there will be no intellectual night. All the errors that now shade and darken our minds--all the obstacles which here impede and limit our acquisitions-shall there be for ever removed. The faculties of the soul which, amid the fogs and illusions of sense, are so restricted in their range, and so distorted in their vision, will, in that radiant world, expand into seraphic strength, and under the beams of eternal day receive a new impulse, and a right direction. The veil also, which now hangs over so many departments of Truth, will then be lifted, and we shall enter her inmost temple, and worship at her most secret shrine.

3. Night is the symbol of sin. The time which God has ordained for rest, man has appropriated to crime. All classes of the depraved and lawless look upon night as their chosen patron and protector. “The way of the wicked is as darkness.” “Men love darkness rather than light, because their deeds are evil.” When, therefore, we read of heaven as being without night, the expression evidently implies that into those holy realms no impurity can ever be admitted. “There shall in no ease enter into it anything that defileth, neither whatsoever worketh abomination, or maketh a lie, but they that are written in the Lamb’s book of life.”

4. Night is the symbol of danger. The hours in which darkness broods over the earth are peculiar for their insecurity. It is then that the robber, the housebreaker, the incendiary, and the whole tribe of depredators on property and life, steal from their lurking places, and roam abroad on their work of mischief. And then it is that perils easily avoided by day deepen and multiply their terrors. The exclusion of night from heaven may, therefore, be interpreted as a pledge that, in that secure asylum, no adversary shall assail us, and no possibility of evil ever menace our peace. The seductions of the world, and the treachery of our own hearts, will not follow us there, nor can Satan cross “the great gulf fixed” between hell and heaven to vex us with his assaults.

5. Night is the symbol of want. Sleep is the sister of death. During its reign over us, we retire within ourselves; the senses close their portals, and the soul is shut in from all its wonted delights. Communion with man and with Nature has ceased. Perception is suspended. Reason is in abeyance. Gone are consciousness, memory, hope. And even should slumber be interrupted, what a dreary blank does the eye behold! Hidden is the rich land-scape--stream, and forest, and mountain--all the grand things and the lovely on which the daylight looks. Above us may glimmer the watching stars and the silvery moon, but they only awaken regret for the nobler luminary departed. So is it that night typifies want; and the fact that heaven knows no night is a most expressive sign that it also knows no privation. Want, in one or another of its forms, is inseparable from our earthly condition. Pilgrims in the desert, we must expect to sigh in vain for much that is essential to perfect felicity. But when we reach the land of Divine fulness above, every need will be supplied. Everything around us, every scene, every object, every employment, will be adapted to exclude disquietude, and to minister delight. Every faculty, every passion, will be absorbed in adoration, and overflowing with ecstasy. And He that sitteth on the throne will bring out His treasures to augment our bliss, showering down upon our spirits all the raptures which Almighty Goodness can bestow.

6. Night is the symbol of death. There are few analogies in the whole range of sacred imagery more suited to represent death than the season of night. And thus we find it very frequently employed by the inspired writers. The Psalmist, in speaking of the removal of his friends by death, says, “Mine acquaintance hast Thou put into darkness.” Job calls death “the day of darkness,” and the grave “the bed of darkness,” “a land of darkness, as darkness itself; and of the shadow of death, without any order, and where the light is as darkness.” “Our Divine Teacher has also given us a very striking description of death under the figure of night. “I must work the works of Him that sent Me while it is day; the night cometh in which no man can work.” To beings situated as we are, it is hardly possible to form an idea of a state of existence in which death is unknown. Yet this is true of heaven. “There shall be no more death.” Oh, what a soul-ravishing announcement is this! No more death! Then hope has dawned on the midnight of the tomb; the King of Terrors is despoiled of his power, and the all-conqueror is himself conquered! No more death to our persons--no more death to our attainments--no more death to our usefulness--no more death to our joys! All are changeless and perfect. God is our portion, holiness our vesture, happiness our allotment, eternity our home. Oh, what a boon is Immortality when it thus stamps its own endless duration on all that awaits us in “the Better Land!” (Dr. Ide.)

The vision of the truth

I. Now here is seen the value of Christian principle. The Man of Sorrows is on His march for the morning; for the principles of the passion place you on the track of the dawn.

II. These principles are powers of guidance in three important--nay, momentous--questions of conduct.

1. What is seriously necessary for any soul in order, in its mortal journey, to be useful and happy? The answer is--Not to live at random, but to have an object in life.

2. What is to be my view of the world? What is the attitude of the soul of the Christian towards the mass of mankind? The optimist views it all through the medium of a rose-coloured dream. All is going onward as merry as a marriage-bell. The only objection is--theories do not alter human suffering, and to this theory facts do not square. It is impossible here reasonably to deny the darkness. It is true it is blessed to remember “there shall be no night there.”

3. There is here a revelation of the future. The eternal city is in fact the working out of the twofold Divine benediction. It is the completion and beatified result of purified characters. “Blessed are the undefiled in the way,” and “Blessed is he whose unrighteousness is forgiven and whose sin is covered.” This is the glorious end of innocence and penitence. The breaking of the dawn! It is coming, there is a land of brightness after darkness; amid all sorrow hope will yet have its triumph: “there shall be no night there”!

III. Night here, however. Why? From the absence of the sun: from the accumulation of the clouds.

1. There is sin. Wills opposed to the will of changeless goodness: wills almost fixed in evil--eyes from which all vision of brightness seems gone: hearts which seem to keep no trace of pity. Ah me!--a ruined soul, or a soul on the road to ruin, how terrible! To be growing worse instead of better: to be losing foothold, not climbing boldly on. Soul of a sinner! Pause, think twice. It is hard to imagine deliverance: hard to believe at times that God’s grace, that fresh breezes from the heavenly courts, can disperse such clouds, but it is true. Look up, march eastward; repent, cry for help, take heart; though the path be rough it is the path of the Holy Passion. The city of the saints is the land of the sunlight. “There shall be no night there.”

2. There is sorrow. Ah! who has ever read, who can ever read, the mystery of tears? But there it is. There is a home where no sorrow enters--there dwelleth no evil, “there is no night there.”

3. There is death. However it be lightened by the faith of a Christian, what thinking mind can fail to acknowledge there is the solemnity of night about the grave? Well, the dawn of eternity shall break, and death itself shall die.

IV. There are many difficulties, many sorrows; yet are there not some alleviations? Life is never altogether darkness When it is illuminated by hope. Look upward, take courage, never allow the cowardice of permanent despondency, or the blasphemy of final despair. Trust God. Surely even here are streaks in the darkness. There are quiet hours of rest and blessing; such a converse with a dear friend; such a happy day of pleasure; such evidence that the sun is there, though veiled by the vapour; such approaches of the daylight; such streaks of the dawn. To repent, heartily, manfully, thoroughly, when you have sinned; to receive trial and sorrow with loving submission, and willingly to taste the sweet “uses of adversity”; to love goodness, truth, duty, God in Christ, and by the power, the moral power of love, to help and make men better--this, this, surely, whatever happens, is to plant your feet firmly on the track of the dawn.

V. What about the future? Well, John assures us that there lies before us something beyond all words happy, which he can only convey to us by speaking of it as “a city.” Remember that in that city you will find the result of your toil and the end of your journey. (Canon Knox Little.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Revelation 21:25". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/revelation-21.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the gates of it shall not be shut at all by day,.... Which does not design the free communication between the living saints on the new earth, and the raised ones in the new heaven, as some have thought, for these shall be together, and make up one body; but rather the universal collection, and free admission of all the saints from all parts into this city; though it seems best to interpret it of the safety of the inhabitants, see Jeremiah 49:31 who will have no enemy to fear, and therefore need never shut their gates; the beast and false prophet will have been taken, and cast into the lake of fire long ago; ungodly men will be destroyed in the general conflagration, and Satan will be bound in the bottomless pit during the thousand years:

for there shall be no night there; this is a reason given why it is before said the gates shall not be shut by day, since it is unusual to shut gates in the day, unless in time of war, because there will be no night in this city, and so no need of ever shutting the gates; the night time being the season for thieves and robbers, and for enemies to make their incursions, and to surprise: but here will be no night; either literally, times and seasons, as measured by the revolutions of the sun and moon, will be no more, they will not have the use they have; at least this city will stand in no need of them. The Jews sayF3Bereshit Rabba, sect. 91. fol. 79. 4. , that the world to come will be כולו יום, "all day": or mystically and figuratively, there will be no night of spiritual darkness and desertion, of drowsiness, sleepiness, and inactivity, of error and heresy, or of calamity and distress of any kind; all which are sometimes signified by night in Scripture; see Song of Solomon 3:1 Isaiah 26:9.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-21.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

not be shut … by day — therefore shall never be shut: for it shall always be day. Gates are usually shut by night: but in it shall be no night. There shall be continual free ingress into it, so as that all which is blessed and glorious may continually be brought into it. So in the millennial type.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-21.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Shall in no wise be shut (ου μη κλειστωσινou mē kleisthōsin). Double negative with the first aorist passive subjunctive of κλειωkleiō day (ημεραςhēmeras). Genitive of time. Mentioned alone without νυκτοςnuktos (by night), “for there shall be no night there” (νυχ γαρ ουκ εσται εκειnux gar ouk estai ekei). This looks like a continued picture of heaven.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-21.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

By day; meaning the whole day, of twenty-four hours.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/revelation-21.html. 1878.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE NIGHT PASSED

‘There shall be no night there.’

Revelation 21:25

What does darkness stand for? Of what is it often spoken of as a type?

I. Darkness is the equivalent of uncertainty.—Only when we see no more ‘through a glass darkly,’ but ‘face to face,’ only when the great enigma has been solved, shall we know even as we are known. And that is what St. John meant as he gazed upon the heavenly city, New Jerusalem, into which the kings of the earth had brought their honour and glory. There was no more uncertainty, no more of those trials of doubt and perplexity which beset us here. All was bright and radiant in the light which was no more attended by any shadow, because the shadows had every one been dispelled. ‘There was no night there.’

II. Darkness is suggestive of isolation.—In the night the faces of our fellow-creatures are withdrawn for a while, and all familiar objects are hidden.

III. Darkness is suggestive of weariness.—It is to recruit our weariness that gentle Night steals down and covers us with her mantle of forgetfulness and soothes all our powers to rest. But there will be no scope for this loving office of the night in that blessed home where weariness will be impossible, where work will be pure joy, because the glorified body, in which we hope to serve our God in ways which He will unfold to us there, will have left all weariness behind.

—Rev. W. H. Savile.

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Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/revelation-21.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

25 And the gates of it shall not be shut at all by day: for there shall be no night there.

Ver. 25. For there shall be no night there] And so no need to fear a sudden surprise by the enemy watching his opportunity. Their day above is ανεσπερος ημερα, a nightless day, as a Father calls it.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-21.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And the gates of it shall not be shut at all by day: the reason of shutting a city’s gates, is either to shut out enemies, or to keep in such as are within: there will be no need of shutting these gates on either of these accounts; there will be no enemies to fear, and those that are within this city will have no need nor desire to go out.

For there shall be no night there: we do not ordinarily shut our city gates by day, but there shall be nothing but day, no night in a natural or metaphorical sense.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-21.html. 1685.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And the gates thereof shall in no wise be shut by day (for there shall be no night there):

"The perpetually open gates symbolize perfect safety."[59] "And there shall be no night there ..." These precious words have been sung by the saints of all ages. Darkness is a time of danger, fear, and the works of darkness; but no such things shall any longer exist at the time foretold here.

ENDNOTE:

[59] James William Russell, op. cit., p. 654.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-21.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

In John"s day cities closed their gates to keep enemies out, but there will be no enemies in the eternal state so the gates will remain open (cf. Isaiah 60:11). John said the city gates will never ever close (Gr. ou me kleisthosin). These kings, therefore, may enter whenever they wish. There will be no night in the New Jerusalem because God"s glory illuminates all.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-21.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 21:25. And the gates of it shall not be shut at all by day; for there shall be no night there. The design of the words is to set forth the perfect peace and security of the inhabitants of the heavenly city. How often had the gates of an ancient city to be closed, always by night, often by day! How often had measures of precaution to be taken against apprehended danger! Here there is no danger, no apprehension, no enemy to approach the gate, but happiness perfect and for ever undisturbed. The explanation of the last clause of the verse, beginning as it does with the word ‘for,’ has afforded some cause of perplexity to interpreters. Yet the explanation generally given is satisfactory. In Isaiah 60:11 the prophet, speaking of the future city of God, had said, ‘Thy gates shall be open continually; they shall not be shut day nor night.’ St. John is referring to that passage, but he could not adopt it as it stood, and he would explain why he stopped short at the word ‘day’ of the prophet He could not bring the thought of ‘night’ into connection with the New Jerusalem, for there was ‘no night there.’ There may have been something more in his thoughts. We know from John 13:30 the symbolical meaning which he attached to the word ‘night’ ‘It was night’ when Judas went out upon his errand of treachery and crime. The first clause of the verse contains the emblem of security and peace. The second assigns the reason why these shall continue undisturbed. There shall be no night there, no darkness either physical or moral, neither men nor deeds that shun the light.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-21.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

not . . . at all. App-105.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-21.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the gates of it shall not be shut at all by day: for there shall be no night there.

Not be shut ... by day - therefore never; for it shall always be day. Gates are usually shut by night; but in it shall be no night. There shall be continual free ingress; so that all which is blessed may be brought into it. So in the millennial type.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-21.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the gates of it shall not be shut at all by day: for there shall be no night there.
the gates
Isaiah 60:11
for
22:5; Isaiah 60:20; Zechariah 14:7
Reciprocal: Joshua 2:5 - of shutting;  Ezekiel 48:31 - GeneralRevelation 21:12 - twelve gates

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-21.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

The gates shall not be shut at all by day (or day by day). This also is based upon the practice of ancient cities closing their gates at the approach of night ( Joshua 2:5). John says there will not be any need for such a performance, for there shall be no night there. It is his way of emphasizing the absence of night, for there will be no enemy who could enter the city any way.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-21.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 21:25

Revelation 21:25-27 And the gates of it shall not be shut at all by day: for there shall be no night there26 And they shall bring the glory and honour of the nations into it27 And there shall in no wise enter into it any thing that defileth, neither whatsoever worketh abomination, or maketh a lie: but they which are written in the Lamb's book of life.

The gates standing open continually, doth show the entrance in of the abundance of the converted gentiles into the church of the converted Jews in the latter days, Isaiah 6:10-13 even the fullness of the gentiles. { Romans 11:25-27} And the glory of the gentile nations shall be brought to the new Jerusalem; and God will glorify the house of his glory. { Isaiah 60:7-20; Revelation 21:27} All persons, whose names are not written in the Lamb's Book of Life, shall be kept out of the new Jerusalem: None but God's elect shall have an entrance admitted to them into that holy city. { 2 Peter 1:10-11; Revelation 22:14-15}

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Bibliographical Information
Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-21.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 21:25. And its gates shall not be shut by day; for there shall be no night there. Revelation 21:26. And they shall bring the glory and the honour of the nations into it. The words, for there shall be no night there," intimate the reason why the day merely is spoken of, since commonly the gates of a city are to be shut during night. The words, "and they shall bring," &c. give the reason why the gates stand continually open, that the glory and honour of the heathen may find entrance into the new Jerusalem, which in St John's time was so hard a matter for faith. The fundamental passage is Isaiah 9:11, "And thy gates stand open continually, day and night they shall not be shut, to bring to thee the riches of the heathen, and their kings shall be led." Neither here, nor in the passage before us, is any respect had to rest and security, as the reason for the gates standing open. Day and night in Isaiah is as much as continually. The night, in the sense in which it is here said to have ceased, is there also brought to an end, Revelation 21:20. The difference between the two passages is merely in the letter. Revelation 21:7 is to be supplied from Revelation 21:20.

There will be no night there, namely, because the glory of the Lord shall constantly enlighten it—comp. Revelation 21:11; Revelation 21:23, Revelation 22:5, where we learn that the reason of there being no night in it, arises from the constant shining of the Lord on it. Night denotes a state destitute of blessing, such as always enters when the gracious presence of the Lord is withheld. The militant church is in this respect subjected to a continual alternation. The sad word, "and it was night," John 13:30, is often quite overlooked both in regard to the church as a whole, and to individual believers. Allusion is made to Isaiah 9:10, "Thy sun shall no more go down, and thy moon shall not withdraw herself, for the Lord will be to thee for an everlasting light, and the days of thy mourning shall be ended."

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Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-21.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

25.The twelve pearl gates or doors, each three approachable from the four points of compass, shall never be shut. The twice twelve tribal nations shall ever find it day, and ever find open gates. The gates of gospel grace are ever open here on earth, the gates of the New Jerusalem shall ever be open to the dwellers of the heavenly earth.

For—Reason for mentioning day only, there shall be no night. The divine glory never remits, never dims. No revolving of the orb renders the opposite hemisphere dark. No north pole caps the arctic with ice. No glaciers chill the air, no night-shade broods with malaria, or spreads her cover over crime. Here we may read into this description the beautiful passage, Revelation 7:14-17. See our notes there.

 

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-21.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

. . . “for no night (when even in peace they would be shut, Nehemiah 13:19) shall be there”.

 

 

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 21:25". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-21.html. 1897-1910.