Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 21:5

And He who sits on the throne said, "Behold, I am making all things new." And He *said, "Write, for these words are faithful and true."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Heaven;   Readings, Select;   Restoration;   Righteous;   Throne;   Thompson Chain Reference - Future, the;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   New;   The Topic Concordance - Earth;   Heaven/the Heavens;   Jerusalem;   Newness;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jerusalem;   Solomon's Song;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Apocalyptic literature;   Peace;   Vision;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Apocalyptic;   Church, the;   Confidence;   Create, Creation;   Image of God;   Jesus Christ;   New Command;   New Creation;   Restore, Renew;   Touch;   World;   Worship;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Faithful;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Holy Spirit, the;   Noah;   Rest;   Revelation of John, the;   Thousand Years;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Heaven;   Jerusalem;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hope;   Revelation, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Alpha and Omega;   Alpha and Omega (2);   Atonement (2);   Eschatology;   Grace;   Lord's Supper (Ii);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Eternal State;   Faithful,;   New;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Bottle;   Bride;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Faithful Sayings;   Revelation of John:;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for June 11;   Faith's Checkbook - Devotion for December 14;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Behold, I make all things new - As the creation of the world at the beginning was the work of God alone, so this new creation.

These words are true and faithful - Truth refers to the promise of these changes; faithfulness, to the fulfillment of these promises.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-21.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And he that sat upon the throne said - Probably the Messiah, the dispenser of the rewards of heaven. See the notes on Revelation 20:11.

Behold, I make all things new - A new heaven and new earth Revelation 21:1, and an order of things to correspond with that new creation. The former state of things when sin and death reigned will be changed, and the change consequent on this must extend to everything.

And he said unto me, Write - Make a record of these things, for they are founded in truth, and they are adapted to bless a suffering world. Compare the notes on Revelation 14:13. See also Revelation 1:19.

For these words are true and faithful - They are founded in truth, and they are worthy to be believed. See the notes on Revelation 19:9. Compare also notes on Daniel 12:4.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-21.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he that sat upon the throne said,.... By whom is meant, either God the Father, who is often represented in this book as sitting on the throne, and as distinguished from Christ the Lamb; see Revelation 4:2 Revelation 5:13 and who may seem the more to be intended, since he is by adopting grace the God and Father of his people, and they are his sons and daughters; or rather Christ, who not only is set down on the same throne with his Father, but has a throne of his own, called the throne of the Lamb, and was seen upon one by John in the preceding vision, Revelation 20:11 which though in order of time will be after this, yet in the order of the visions was seen before; and especially since the person on the throne speaking, calls himself the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, as Christ does in Revelation 1:8 and seeing he it is that gives to thirsty souls of the water of life, John 7:37 and makes promises to the overcomer so largely and frequently in Revelation 2:7. He addresses John, and delivers the following things to him,

behold, I make all things new; which is to be understood not of the renovation of persons at conversion, when a new heart and spirit are given, and men are made wholly new creatures; for this is the work of the Spirit, and which is done daily, and is not peculiar to any particular period of time; nor of the renewing of the church state at the beginning of the Gospel, when the Jewish church state and ordinances waxed old, and vanished away, and a new covenant took place, a new and living way was opened, and new ordinances appointed, since all this was before John had this vision; nor was there any need of it to represent it to him; but of the making of the new heaven, and the new earth, which Christ ascribes to himself and of his forming his church anew, making it a new Jerusalem, bestowing new glories upon his people, both in soul and body, and so presenting them to himself a glorious church; and of the new administration of his kingdom in a very singular and glorious manner; so that it respects a new people, a new habitation, and a new manner of ruling over them; all which is his own doing, and is marvellous; and because it is a matter of great importance, and is wonderful and certain, therefore a "behold" is prefixed to it; see Isaiah 43:19. The Jews sayF26Shemot Rabba, sect. 15. fol. 101. 3. , that the holy blessed God will make ten things new in the future state, or world to come; the first is, he will enlighten the world; (See Revelation 21:11) the second is, he will bring living water out of Jerusalem; (see Revelation 21:6) the third is, he will make trees to bring forth their fruit every month; (see Revelation 22:2) and the fourth is, all the waste places shall be built, even Sodom and Gomorrha; the fifth is, Jerusalem shall be built with sapphire stone; (see Revelation 21:19) the sixth is, the cow and the bear shall feed; the seventh is, a covenant shall be made between Israel, and the beasts, fowls, and creeping things; the eighth is, there shall be no more weeping and howling in the world; the ninth is, there shall be no more death in the world; the tenth is, there shall no more be sighing, and groaning, and sorrow in the world; see Revelation 21:4.

And he said unto me, write; what John had seen, and Christ had said, and was about to say; and particularly what concerned the renewing of all things, the whole being a matter of moment, and worth noting and taking down in writing, that it might be on record for saints to read, and receive comfort and advantage from; and to denote the certainty of it, as well as to show that it was a clear point, and to be known, whereas, when it was otherwise, he was bid not to write; see Revelation 1:11.

for these words are true and faithful; both what he had said, and was about to say; they were "true", because they came from God, who cannot lie, and "faithful", because they would be punctually and exactly fulfilled; see Revelation 19:9. The Syriac version adds, they are God's, and so the Arabic version.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-21.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

4 And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, Write: for these words are true and faithful.

(4) In the speech of God himself describing the Church, is first an introduction, or entrance. Then follows a magnificent description of the Church, by the present and future good things of the same, in three verses following (Revelation 21:6-8). In the introduction God challenges to himself the restoring of all the creatures, (Revelation 21:1) and witnesses the calling of John to the writing of these things, in this verse.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-21.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

satGreek, “sitteth.”

all things new — not recent, but changed from the old (Greek, “{(kaina},” not “{(nea}”). An earnest of this regeneration and transfiguration of nature is given already in the regenerate soul.

unto me — so Coptic and Andreas. But A, B, Vulgate, and Syriacomit.

true and fai)thful — so Andreas. But A, B, Vulgate, Syriac, and Coptic transpose, “faithful and true” (literally, “genuine”).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-21.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Behold, I make all things new (Ιδου καινα ποιω πανταIdou kaina poiō panta). The first time since Revelation 1:8 that God has been represented as speaking directly, though voices have come out of the throne before (Revelation 21:3) and out of the sanctuary (Revelation 16:1, Revelation 16:17), which may be from God himself, though more likely from one of the angels of the Presence. This message is not addressed to John (Revelation 7:14; Revelation 17:7; Revelation 21:6; Revelation 22:6), but to the entire world of the blessed. See Isaiah 43:18. for the words (Ιδου εγω ποιω καιναIdou egō poiō kaina). The idea of a new heaven and a new earth is in Isaiah 65:17; Isaiah 66:22; Psalm 102:25. For the locative here with επιepi (επι τωι τρονωιepi tōi thronōi) see Revelation 7:10; Revelation 19:4 (genitive more usual, Revelation 4:9.; Revelation 5:1, Revelation 5:7, Revelation 5:13, etc.). See Revelation 20:11 for the picture.

And he saith (και λεγειkai legei). Probably this means a change of speakers, made plain by μοιmoi (to me) in many MSS. An angel apparently (as in Revelation 14:13; Revelation 19:9.) assures John and urges him to write (γραπσονgrapson as in Revelation 1:11; Revelation 2:1, Revelation 2:8, Revelation 2:12, Revelation 2:18; Revelation 3:1, Revelation 3:7, Revelation 3:14; Revelation 14:3). The reason given (οτιhoti for) is precisely the saying in Revelation 22:6 and he uses the two adjectives (πιστοι και αλητινοιpistoi kai alēthinoi) employed in Revelation 19:11 about God himself, and Revelation 3:14 about Christ. In Revelation 19:9 αλητινοιalēthinoi occurs also about “the words of God” as here. They are reliable and genuine.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-21.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

True and faithful ( ἀληθινοὶ καὶ πιστοί )

The proper order of the Greek is the reverse, as Rev., faithful and true.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-21.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, Write: for these words are true and faithful.

And he that sat upon the throne said — Not to St. John only. From the first mention of "him that sat upon the throne," Revelation 4:2, this is the first speech which is expressly ascribed to him.

And he — The angel.

Saith to me Write — As follows.

These sayings are faithful and true — This includes all that went before. The apostle seems again to have ceased writing, being overcome with ecstasy at the voice of him that spake.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-21.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

And he that sat upon the throne; Jehovah. This seems to be in allusion to the vision described Revelation 4:2,3.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/revelation-21.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

5 And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, Write: for these words are true and faithful.

Ver. 5. Write; for these words are faithful] Though few men will believe them; for if they did, what would they not do or forego to get heaven? Cleombrotus reading Plato’s book of the immortality of the soul, was so ravished with the conceit thereof, that he cast himself headlong into the sea. But how many reading this better book of heaven’s happiness, are no whit wrought upon thereby, or in the least measure moved to affect those things above, that run parallel with the life of God and line of eternity!

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-21.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Note here, 1. How these new heavens and new earth come to be effected and made, namely, by the omnipotent power of Christ, Behold I make all things new; a good argument to encourage us to go unto Christ by prayer for renewing grace. Surely he that makes new heavens can make new hearts, he that renews an old world, can renew us in the spirit of our minds, and make old things pass away, and cause all things to become new.

Next he commands St. John to write, that these words set down here, and throughout this prophecy, are true and faithful. We see then that the holy scriptures were written at the Lord's command, and therefore from him they do derive their authority.

Observe, 2. The word of assurance here uttered by Christ, for the confirmation of what he had before declared and promised, He said unto me, It is done; signifying thereby, that it is as certain as if it was already done; namely, whatever he had promised relating to his church's happiness, and all that he had threatened relating to her enemies' destruction; let not the Church then at any time stagger in her faith.

Observe, 3. The title which Christ is pleased here to resume, which before was given by himself, chap. 1.8. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end; to show, that, as he first made the world, so he was now about to put a period to it, and would give to every thirsty or believing soul an everlasting life in the new Jerusalem, which shall no more decay than water, which is an ever-springing fountain, can be dried up.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/revelation-21.html. 1700-1703.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 21:5. καινὰ πάντα ποιῶ(226)) A more ancient reading is, καινὰ ποιῶ πάντα; and καινὰ ποιῶ answers to the single word חַדֵּשׁ, and ought not to be separated. This is a word implying publication, and not command.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-21.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And he that sat upon the throne, that is, Christ,

said, Behold, I make all things new; behold, I will put a new face upon all things; the state of my people shall not for ever be a troubled and afflicted state.

And he said unto me, Write: because the vision is to be for an appointed time, and what I now tell thee will not be accomplished of many years, and yet the knowledge and prospect of it, and meditations upon it, are of highest importance to keep up the spirits of my people under all their sufferings, during that time of the dragon (the Romish heathen emperors) not yet run out, and the twelve hundred and sixty years of antichrist, &c., therefore write it, that all my people in all ages may know it, believe it, and suffer patiently in the hopes of it.

For these words are true and faithful; for, what I tell time is what comes from the true and faithful Witness, and shall have a certain being in its time.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-21.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

истинны и верны Ср. 3:14; 19:11. Бог всегда говорит правду (Ин. 17:17).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-21.html.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And he that sitteth on the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he saith: Write: for these words are faithful and true.

He that sitteth on the throne said ... God himself is the speaker here, somewhat of a rarity in Revelation.

Behold, I make all things new ... Only God can create anew. "This is a hard blow to proud, humanistic, naturalistic man who believes that he is capable of building a better tomorrow through research, applied technology, etc."[14] Leagues of Nations, United Nations, conferences on human rights, five-year plans, or hundred-year programs are all foredoomed to defeat and frustration. Only God can make new.

And he saith ... Apparently, God also said this.

Write, for the words are faithful and true ... The making of all things new is such a super-colossal conception that John seems to have been completely astounded by it, and needed to be prompted to keep on writing. "The words are faithful and true" seems to carry the thought that no matter how stupendous and impossible such things may appear to people, God will nevertheless certainly create all things new!

ENDNOTE:

[14] James D. Strauss, The Seer, the Saviour, and the Saved (Jopkin, Missouri: College Press, 1972), p. 276.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-21.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And he who sits on the throne said, “Behold I make all things new”.’

In case this all seems too good to be true God Himself now confirms it personally. Previously He has been passive while the action He has initiated goes on around Him. But now He speaks, for it is His own people who are involved, and He declares ‘Behold, I make all things new!’ And then goes on to outline His intentions on the basis of the fact that He is the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the Ending. Now He will prove Himself to be the Ending. he will bring His work to a satisfactory conclusion. (We can compare the similar situation in Revelation 11:3 when God said ‘I will give’, in contrast with ‘it was given’ in Revelation 7:2; Revelation 9:5).

Compare here Isaiah 43:18-19. God is doing a new thing and is providing life-giving waters, giving drink to His people, to His chosen (Isaiah 43:20, see Revelation 21:6 here), having Himself blotted out their transgressions and stopped remembering their sins (Isaiah 43:25). Compare also 2 Corinthians 5:17 where men in Christ form a new creation and all things become new. This is the final fulfilment of those first beginnings, brought about by the work of Him Who reconciled His people to Himself through Christ. The groaning of the old creation (Romans 8:18-25) has ceased and all is now fully restored.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/revelation-21.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

John turned from describing the New Jerusalem briefly to describe some of God"s utterances (cf. Revelation 1:8; Revelation 20:11). "Behold" introduces a special pronouncement, namely, that God will bring a new creation into existence. The description of the new creation in the preceding verses was proleptic. Evidently an angel then instructed John to write down what God had said because His words were faithful and true, not incredible (cf. Revelation 22:6). [Note: Alford, 4:737; Lee, 4:818.] Possibly it was God Himself who uttered this second statement. [Note: Swete, p279.] If Song of Solomon, this is probably the first time in the book that God the Father spoke. Perhaps the vision so enthralled John that he stopped recording it.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-21.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 21:5. What the Seer had before heard regarding the new creation had proceeded from a voice ‘out of the throne’ (Revelation 21:3). Now God Himself, he that sitteth on the throne, speaks. For the first time in this book the direct voice of God is heard. Hitherto He has been veiled in His own unspeakable majesty and glory, watching indeed with the deepest interest the fortunes of His Church, overruling all things for her good, but Himself unseen, unheard. Now He breaks His silence; and, as One who dwells with men (Revelation 21:4), directs their thoughts to the accomplishment of His own holy and gracious will. His words are, I make all things new, where the emphasis rests upon the word ‘new:’ ‘Old things are passed away; behold, they are become new’ (2 Corinthians 5:17).—It is possible that the next words spoken in this verse, Write; for these words are faithful and true, may be the voice not of God, but of an angel. As no angel, however, has been spoken of in the preceding verses, and as the words now uttered are properly a parenthesis indicating the deep interest of the Almighty in His people, there is no sufficient cause to bring in the interposition of any third party. God Himself says to His servant ‘Write,’ and Himself assures him not only that His words are ‘faithful’ but that they are ‘true.’ The new heavens and the new earth are the end towards which God has been always working. The whole history of the world, with its opposition to the truth and: with the judgments that have overtaken it; the whole history of the Church, with her struggles and victories, has not been accidental. It has been the carrying out of God’s ‘bright designs’ from the moment when He expressed Himself in the works and in the creatures of His hands.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-21.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

sat = sitteth. Literally the (One) sitting.

upon. App-104. with texts.

said = saith.

unto me. The texts omit.

words. App-121.

true, &c. The texts read "faithful and true". Compare Revelation 19:11.

true. App-175.

faithful. App-150and App-175

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-21.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, Write: for these words are true and faithful.

Sat - `sitteth.'

All things new - not recent, but changed from the old [ kaina (Greek #2537), not nea]. An earnest of this regeneration of nature is given already in the regenerate soul.

Unto me. So 'Aleph ('), Coptic, Andreas; but A B, Vulgate, Syriac, omit.

True and faithful. So Andreas; but 'Aleph (') A B, Vulgate, Syriac, Coptic, transpose, 'faithful and true' (genuine).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-21.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

THE SECOND VOICE.—The voice of Him who sitteth on the Throne (Revelation 21:5-8).

(5) And he that sat upon the throne . . .—Better, And he who sitteth on the throne said, Behold, I am making all things new. And he saith (the words “unto me” should be omitted) write; because these words are faithful and true. It is the Throned one, the One who rules over all things from the beginning, and who has presided over all the changing scenes of earth’s history, who speaks; it is He who makes even the wrath of man to praise Him, and who causes all things to work together for good to them that love Him, who gives this heart-helping assurance. “I am making all things new.” In spite of the moral disorder, the pain and grief, the dark shadows of life and history, the new creation is being prepared, and will rise, like the early creation, out of chaos. The analogy between the old and new creation is the reason why the first chapter of Genesis and the earlier verses of this chapter are appointed as the morning lessons for Septuagesima Sunday; as out of an earth without form and void rose the world of order and beauty, which God pronounced very good, so out of the world, so full of distress and tears, and overshadowed by so many clouds of sin, will emerge the glad new world, wherein dwelleth righteousness. The closing words of the verse, perhaps an instruction from the angel, but more probably still the voice of Him that sits on the throne, adds the further assurance, “These words are true and faithful.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-21.html. 1905.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

5. And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, Write: for these words are faithful and true.--21:5.

He who sat on the throne gave this command which the angel communicated to John, and in a parenthetical phrase John referred to the original command given to him by Christ in chapter 1:19. The Seer was ready to do what he had been commanded to do at the beginning; and they were here attested to be faithful and true words; it was in the character of swearing to the truthfulness of what John was about to write, a form of an oath in affirmation of veracity. It was before the visions were received that the voice of chapter 1 had prompted John to record the things which would be heard and seen.

It was the same voice which had first commanded him to write which now was heard to say: Behold, I make all things new. This same expression has been used to distinguish spiritual Israel from fleshly Israel (2 Corinthians 5:17); and that phrase was employed here in distinction of the new heaven and new earth from the old system of Judaism.

With the fall of the old Jerusalem, the destruction of its theocracy, the termination of the Jewish state, and the removal of the last vestige of Judaism, a new order would prevail under new surroundings.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-21.html. 1966.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, Write: for these words are true and faithful.
that sat
4:2,9; 5:1; 20:11
Behold
Isaiah 42:9; 43:19; 2 Corinthians 5:17
Write
1:11,19
these
19:9
Reciprocal: Psalm 104:30 - renewest;  Ecclesiastes 1:9 - and there;  Ezekiel 36:26 - new heart;  Daniel 11:2 - will I;  Habakkuk 2:2 - Write;  Matthew 19:28 - in the regeneration;  Luke 5:38 - GeneralGalatians 6:15 - but;  Colossians 3:10 - the new;  1 Timothy 1:15 - a faithful;  Revelation 3:7 - he that is true;  Revelation 7:10 - sitteth;  Revelation 14:13 - Write;  Revelation 21:1 - a new;  Revelation 21:22 - I saw;  Revelation 22:6 - These

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-21.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

GOD ON HIS THRONE SPEAKS.

Revelation 21:5-7. — "And He that sat on the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And He says (to me), Write, for these words are true and faithful. And He said to me, It is done. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give to him that thirsts of the fountain of the water of life freely. He that overcomes shall inherit these things, and I will be to him God, and he shall be to Me son." It is remarkable how often God by name or pronoun is referred to as the source of all blessing and action in the everlasting state. The Lamb is there as the husband and eternal companion of the Church, but as such He does not appear in the verses before us, save in one passing reference (Revelation 21:2). The kingdom has been delivered up to God, not that Christ ever ceases to reign, nor that He ever ceases to be man, but the reign of righteousness in putting down all opposing authority and rule having been accomplished we witness new triumphs of another character. God in the energy of His nature produces a scene according to what He is. It is not a question of subduing foes, but of God delighting Himself in forming a people and things according to Himself. God Himself is the actor in this scene of intense and thrilling interest.

5. — The Sitter on the throne said, "Behold, I make all things new." God on the throne of omnipotence, of absolute sovereignty, declares His will — all things new. The old order of things is not improved, nor in anywise imported into the eternal state, for that condition demands a state of things in keeping with it; and God is the measure and source of the whole eternal state, whether of persons or things. Nothing short of what becomes God can appear in the unchanging state; hence, "I make all things new."

Then the Seer is called to write as in Revelation 19:9. Only the earlier command is given by an angel; here by God Himself. Special communications of deep import were directed to be written (Luke 10:20; John 20:31; Habakkuk 2:2; Revelation 3:12; Revelation 14:13, etc.). What are the words which the Seer was commanded to write? Those just uttered by God on His throne "Behold, I make all things new."

In this sentence is fixed the character of the eternal state. Grand words surely, and worth recording! God, too, authenticates His own magnificent declaration by adding, "for these words are true and faithful." He demands our attention, and claims our hearty and unqualified assent. "Behold, I make all things new." "Write, for these words are true and faithful." This is not promise, but the divine assertion of that which is fact when the moment comes for its realisation.

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-21.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

He that sat upon the throne is the same as was shown in Revelation 20:11. He is the one who created all things that exist, but all the items that were msds in the first creation pertaining to the material universe will be replaced with a new order of things that will be eternal, and adapted to the needs and enjoyment of the glorified part of humanity. The pronoun he means the angel who has been John's companion and exhibitor all through the vision of this book. Having taken a view of these wonderful objects the angel tells John to write the description in his book, and assures him that all that he has seen and heard is true and faithful, which means the vision and the words are a faithful report of the truth.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-21.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 21:5

Revelation 21:5 And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, Write: for these words are true and faithful

He that sat upon the throne

is our Lord Jesus Christ, who made the world and all things therein, { John 1:1-3; Hebrews 1:2} Whose name is called the Word of God, { Revelation 19:13}

I make all things new;

that Isaiah, I will now restore all things to their original purity and perfection. { Acts 3:19-21}

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-21.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 21:5. And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold I make all things new. And he says:[Note: The to me, which Luther adds, ought to be deleted, according to the best authorities.] Write, for these words are certain and true. He that sat upon the throne, is God in the undistinguished unity of his being (comp. on ch. Revelation 20:11). On the words: "Behold I make all things new," Bengel remarks, "This renewal comprises much more in it than that which is described in 2 Corinthians 5:7, though this also is glorious, and indeed is the ground of that." Berleb. Bible, "This is a great word, which should lead us to nurse our strength, that we may become fresh and vigorous, and may not sell our birthright, like Esau, committing fornication with the world, and seeking all good there."

And he says, etc. The change of tense—he says between the double said—and the similarity of the matter to ch. Revelation 19:9 (in both passages, the command to write, and the assurance of truth and credibility) shew, that here, as well as there, the angel is the speaker.

In regard to the call to write, which points to the high importance of the word spoken, see at ch. Revelation 14:13.

The declaration, "Behold I make all things new," is indeed a great word, and hard to be believed. Where really all must be made new, there it will be difficult for the natural mind to understand, how a change should take place, especially difficult for one on whom the old order of things lies with an oppressive load like a huge mountain, as was the case with the church at the time, when John saw the Revelation. Therefore, the angel adds to the call to write the reason, for these words are certain and true. What is not so, does not deserve to be written, however fine it may sound. The ground of confidence here lies in the fact, that these are the words of God, (comp. ch. Revelation 19:9). The angel cannot by his authority lend support to the words of God; he can only point to the circumstance, that as God's words they deserve the fullest confidence, since he is not a man that he should lie, nor the son of man that he should repent, whose authority alone is sufficient to render the most incredible things true and worthy of confidence.[Note: Bengel expounds differently, "Write, was said to John in respect to what follows, namely, these words are certain and true." Comp. the ὃ τι recitativum in ch. 3:17. But the call to write in the Revelation elsewhere has respect to the revealed truths themselves; (comp. ch. 1:11, 14:13, 10:4), and does not occur in respect to asservations of truthfulness. Accordingly, we must expound, Write what thou hearest (comp. the, Write what thou seest in ch. 1:11), or, Write the words, Behold I make all things new.]

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-21.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

b. Divine announcement of its blessedness and conditions, Revelation 21:5-8.

5.The throne—What throne? Probably the throne of Revelation 4:2. That throne of revelation did not disappear with the old earth, (note on Revelation 4:11;) and the throne of judgment, (Revelation 20:11,) appeared simply as one of the visional phenomena, just like any other symbol in the vision. The throne in the New Jerusalem (Revelation 22:1) has not yet appeared. The throne of revelation, like the angel of the last plagues, (Revelation 22:8,) continues to the close.

New—This is the grand, final renovation.

Write these words—Of this apocalyptic revelation. This is a divine authentication of what the seer is bidden to write. Note Revelation 22:6.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-21.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

The first and only time that God addresses the seer, or indeed (apart from Revelation 1:8) speaks at all. The almost unbroken silence assigned to God in the Apocalypse corresponds to the Egyptian idea of the divine Reason needing no tongue but noiselessly directing mortal things by righteousness (Plut. de Iside, 75; hence the deity is symbolised by the ciocodile, which was believed to be the only animal without a tongue).

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 21:5". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-21.html. 1897-1910.