Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 21:6

Then He said to me, "It is done. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give to the one who thirsts from the spring of the water of life without cost.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Alpha;   Omega;   Readings, Select;   Righteous;   Salvation;   Seekers;   Thirst;   Water;   Thompson Chain Reference - Alpha;   Blessings-Afflictions;   Desire-Satisfaction;   Endowments;   Future, the;   Gifts;   Heaven;   Heavenly;   Home;   Omega;   Seven;   Thirst, Spiritual;   The Topic Concordance - Giving and Gifts;   Jesus Christ;   Living Waters;   Thirst;   Unbelief;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Fountains and Springs;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - A;   Jerusalem;   Solomon's Song;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Apocalyptic literature;   Vision;   Water;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Apocalyptic;   Church, the;   Condemnation;   Confidence;   Create, Creation;   Drink;   Jesus Christ;   New Jerusalem;   Temple;   Time;   Touch;   Water;   Easton Bible Dictionary - A;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Alpha;   Noah;   Thousand Years;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Alpha and Omega;   Heaven;   Omega;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Alpha and Omega;   Hope;   Restoration;   Revelation, Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Alpha and Omega (2);   Attributes of Christ;   Enoch Book of;   Eschatology;   God;   Pre-Existence;   Revelation, Book of;   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Sin (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Alpha;   Beginning;   Eternal State;   Fountain;   Omega ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Bride;   End;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Alpha;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Fountain;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Alpha;   Judgment;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Alpha and Omega;   Begin;   End;   Fountain;   Give;   Jerusalem, New;   Life;   Revelation of John:;   Unchangeable;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Alpha;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

It is done - All is determined, and shall be fulfilled in due time. The great drama is finished, and what was intended is now completed; referring to the period alluded to by the angel.

I am Alpha and Omega - See on Revelation 1:8; (note).

The fountain of the water of life - See on John 4:10; (note), John 4:14; (note); John 7:37; (note), etc.

The rabbins consider the fountain of the world to come as one of the particular blessings of a future state. In Sanhedrim, Aboth R. Nathan, c. 31, it is said, "He will show them the excellency of the fountain of the future world, that they may accurately see and consider, and say, Wo to us! what good have we lost! and our race is cut off from the face of the earth."

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-21.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And he said unto me - That is, he that sat on the throne - the Messiah.

It is done - It is finished, complete; or, still more expressively, “it is” - γέγοναν gegonanAn expression remarkably similar to this occurs in John 19:30, when the Saviour on the cross said, “It is finished.” The meaning in the passage before us evidently is, “The great work is accomplished; the arrangement of human affairs is complete. The redeemed are gathered in; the wicked are cut off; truth is triumphant, and all is now complete - prepared for the eternal state of things.”

I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end - This language makes it morally certain that the speaker here is the Lord Jesus, for it is the very language which he uses of himself in Revelation 1:11. See its meaning explained in the notes on Revelation 1:8. If it is applied to him here, it proves that he is divine, for in the following verse (7) the speaker says that he would be a God to him who should “overcome.” The meaning of the language as used here, regarded as spoken by the Redeemer at the consummation of all things, and as his people are about entering into the abodes of blessedness, is, “I am now indeed the Alpha and the Omega - the first and the last. The attributes implied in this language which I claimed for myself are now verified in me, and it is seen that these properly belong to me. The scheme for setting up a kingdom in the lost world began in me, and it ends in me - the glorious and triumphant king.”

I will give unto him that is athirst - See the Matthew 5:6 note; John 4:14; John 7:37 notes.

Of the fountain of the water of life - An image often used in the Scriptures to represent salvation. It is compared with a fountain that flows in abundance, where all may freely slake their thirst.

Freely - Without money and without price (Isaiah 55:1 note; John 7:37 note); the common representation in the Scriptures. The meaning here is, not that he would do this in the future, but that he had shown that this was his character, as he had claimed, in the same way as he had shown that he was the Alpha and the Omega. The freeness and the fulness of salvation will be one of the most striking things made manifest when the immense hosts of the redeemed shall be welcomed to their eternal abodes.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-21.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he said unto me, it is done,.... The end of all things is come; it is all over with the first heaven and earth; these are no more, and the new heaven and earth are finished: there seems to be an allusion to the old creation, he spake, and it was done, Psalm 33:9. The whole election of grace is completed; every individual vessel of mercy is called by grace; all the saints are brought with Christ, and their bodies raised, and living saints changed, and all together are as a bride prepared for her husband; and the nuptials are now solemnized; all the promises and prophecies relating to the glorious state of the church are now fulfilled; the mystery of God, spoken by his servants, is finished; the kingdom of Christ is complete, and all other kingdoms are destroyed; the day of redemption is come; the salvation of the saints is perfect; what was finished on the cross, by way of impetration, is now done as to application; all are saved with an everlasting salvation.

I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end; which are expressive of the primacy, perfection, and eternity of Christ; of his being the sum and substance, the first cause and last end of all things, relating both to the old and new world, to things temporal and spiritual; See Gill on Revelation 1:8.

I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely; he that is athirst is one that is so not in a natural, much less in a sinful, but in a spiritual sense; who as he has thirsted after Christ, and salvation by him; after pardon of sin, and a justifying righteousness; after communion with Christ, and conformity to him, and a greater degree of knowledge of him; so after the glories of his kingdom, and the happiness of a future state: to such an one Christ promises to give such large measures of grace and glory, and in such abundance, as will continue to refresh and delight, and as may be compared to a fountain of living water, namely, for refreshment, abundance, and continuance; and all this he will give "freely", without money, and without price; for as pardon, and righteousness, and the whole of salvation, are all of free grace, so are all the enjoyments of the kingdom state, the riches, honours, and glories of it, and eternal life itself; also plentifully, and in great abundance, and answers to the Hebrew word חנם; see Numbers 11:5.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-21.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And he said unto me, 5 It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.

(5) The description of the Church is in three parts, by the abolishing of old things, by the being of present things in God, that is, of things eternal: and by the giving of all good things with the godly. If so be they shall contend manfully; (Revelation 21:7). But the reprobate are excluded from there; (Revelation 21:8).
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-21.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

It is done — the same Greek as in Revelation 16:17. “It is come to pass.” So Vulgate reads with English Version. But A reads, “They (‹these words,Revelation 21:5) are come to pass.” All is as sure as if it actually had been fulfilled for it rests on the word of the unchanging God. When the consummation shall be, God shall rejoice over the work of His own hands, as at the completion of the first creation God saw everything that He had made, and behold it was very good (Genesis 1:31).

Alpha  …  OmegaGreek in A and B, “the Alpha  …  the Omega” (Revelation 1:18).

give unto  …  athirst  …  water of life — (Revelation 22:17; Isaiah 12:3; Isaiah 55:1; John 4:13, John 4:14; John 7:37, John 7:38). This is added lest any should despair of attaining to this exceeding weight of glory. In our present state we may drink of the stream, then we shall drink at the Fountain.

freelyGreek, “gratuitously”: the same Greek as is translated, “(They hated Me) without a cause,” John 15:25. As gratuitous as was man‘s hatred of God, so gratuitous is God‘s love to man: there was every cause in Christ why man should love Him, yet man hated Him; there was every cause in man why (humanly speaking) God should have hated man, yet God loved man: the very reverse of what might be expected took place in both cases. Even in heaven our drinking at the Fountain shall be God‘s gratuitous gift.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-21.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

They are come to pass (ΓεγονανGegonan). Second perfect active indicative of γινομαιginomai with αν̇an for ασι̇asi See Revelation 16:17 for a like use of γεγονενgegonen “They have come to pass.” Here again it is the voice of God because, as in Revelation 1:8, He says:

I am the Alpha and the Omega (Εγω το Αλπα και το ΟEgō to Alpha kai to O) with the addition “the beginning and the end” (η αρχη και το τελοςhē archē kai to telos), the whole used in Revelation 22:13 of Christ. In Isaiah 44:6 there is something like the addition, and in Colossians 1:18; Revelation 3:14 η αρχηhē archē is applied to Christ, while here God is the First Cause (αρχηarchē) and the Finality (τελοςtelos) as in Romans 11:36; Ephesians 4:6. But God works through Christ (John 1:3; Hebrews 1:2.; Colossians 1:12-20). God is the bountiful Giver (James 1:5, James 1:17) of the Water of Life. See Revelation 7:17; Revelation 22:1, Revelation 22:17 for this metaphor, which is based on Isaiah 55:1. It is God‘s own promise (Εγω δωσωEgō dōsō), “I will give.”

Of the fountain (εκ της πηγηςek tēs pēgēs). For this partitive use of εκek see Matthew 25:8, without εκek Revelation 2:17.

Freely (δωρεανdōrean). See Matthew 10:8; John 4:10; Romans 3:24; Acts 8:20; Revelation 22:17.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-21.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

It is done ( γέγονεν )

The correct reading is γέγοναν theyare come to pass; i.e., these words.

Alpha and Omega

Both have the article, “the alpha,” etc. See on Revelation 1:8.

Unto him that is athirst

Compare Isaiah 55:1.

Fountain ( πηγῆς )

See on John 4:6.

Of the water of life

See John 4:10, John 4:14. Compare Isaiah 12:3.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-21.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.

And he — That sat upon the throne.

Said to me, It is done — All that the prophets had spoken; all that was spoken, Revelation 4:1. We read this expression twice in this prophecy: first, Revelation 16:17, at the fulfilling of the wrath of God; and here, at the making all things new.

I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end — The latter explains the former: the Everlasting.

I will give to him that thirsteth — The Lamb saith the same, Revelation 22:17.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-21.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

6 And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.

Ver. 6. It is done] As the punishment of the wicked, Revelation 16:17; {See Trapp on "Revelation 16:17"} so the reward of the righteous is performed and accomplished.

I will give unto him] Whereas some good soul might say, I would it were once done. Have patience (saith God), I will shortly give unto him that is athirst to drink of that torrent of pleasure, that runs at my right hand, without any either let or loathing.

" Clitorio quicunque sitim de fonte levarit,

Vina fugit, gaudetque meris abstemius undis."

Ovid. Metam.

Of the water of life, freely] But merit mongers will not have it freely; therefore they shall go without it. Caelum gratis non accipiam, I will not accept heaven for nothing, saith Vega.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-21.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Revelation 21:6

The Idolatry of Novelty.

The one text exhibits to us in a lively picture the working of a great idolatry; the other text shows us the abolition of that idolatry by the satisfaction of the want of which it is the expression. Together they present to us the two sides of our subject, which is the idolatry of novelty. It cannot be denied that there is in all lives, probably not least in the busiest and the loftiest, an element of dulness. This is only to say that there must be routine in every life which is either active or useful; and that the life which is neither active nor useful is sure to have a routine of its own, a monotony of mere indolence or mere self-indulgence, of all monotonies the most irksome and the most fatiguing.

I. The Athenians were not mere gossips or newsmongers. The first sound of the words does them some injustice. Their idolatry of novelty by no means exhausted itself in inventing, or embellishing, or retailing scandalous or mischievous stories against the great men of their city, or against humbler neighbours "dwelling securely by them." Their treatment of St. Paul shows this. He was not a man of sufficient notoriety or sufficient importance to attract the attention of the mere tattler or scandalmonger. It was because he raised grave questions, going to the very root of the national and individual life, that these idolaters of novelty were attracted by him, and thought it worth while to bring him before the religious tribunal of the Areopagus, saying, "May we know what this new doctrine which is talked by thee is?"—"this new doctrine," because, as St. Luke adds in the text, their great interest was in the hearing and telling of "anything at all new."

II. Those Athenians might well have an open ear for the preacher of a new divinity. This was but to confess, what was no secret by this time, that their anonymous altar was still standing, and that they waited to worship till it had a name. For them the idolatry of novelty was their hope and their religion. After all these centuries, we too are left with an anonymous altar, and the worship of English hearts is offered once again at the shrine of an unknown, an avowably unknowable, God. There is not an arrival of a so-called new apostle, there is not an importation of a so-called new divinity, for which this modern Athens has not at least one of its ears open. We are told that some one has dared to say, within the Christian Church of London, that Buddha himself is second only (if second) to Jesus Christ in morals, and superior to Christ Himself in this: that he never claimed for himself Divinity.

III. The very feeling, the very want, the very sense of monotony which has made impatient man set up this paltry idol of novelty, is provided for by God Himself saying, "Behold, I make" (not a few things, but) "all things new." There are two ways of fulfilling the promise of renovation. One is by the renewal of the thing itself; the other is by the renewal of the eye that views it. If the one is the promise of the text, the other is the promise elsewhere alike of St. John and St. Paul. We have all known in ourselves how the same object—sea, sky, cloud, landscape, home itself and its inmates, the loved face, the letter from the dearest one—may look dull or look lively, look beautiful or look ugly, according to the state of the mind that views it. It looks quite different when a sin is strong in us from that which it looked when we had just risen from prayer, and the very skin of the face shone from the reflection of the King in His beauty.

"Dark and cheerless is the morn

Unaccompanied by Thee;

Cheerless is the day's return

Till Thy mercy's beams I see"—

then all is altered. Then the old commandment looks new. Then the heaven and the earth are new for me. Then He that sitteth upon the throne hath said, "Behold, I make all things new"—yea (as St. Paul interprets), the old things themselves.

C. J. Vaughan, Restful Thoughts for Restless Times, p. 272.


All Things New.

I. Consider what Holy Scripture teaches us as to our resurrection life. Let us try to learn something as to the state and place in which we hope to find ourselves hereafter. We are expressly told that there shall be a new heaven and a new earth. Our home, our bright, blessed, glorious home, is not to be in a world of sin and sorrow, not in a world which groans under the curse of God, but it will be a new home, nothing like what we see now, something quite different, something quite fresh, something altogether new: a new heaven and a new earth. "The former things"—death, sorrow, sickness, sin, temptation, misery, wretchedness; all that makes life a burden to us; all that troubles us and vexes us; all that saddens us and grieves us in this lower existence—all will have gone for ever; "the former things are passed away."

II. Not only is the place to be new, but those that inhabit the place must be new also. If no sin can enter there, if no sickness, no weariness, no weakness, if none of these things can enter that new Jerusalem, then certainly we must be new—new in body and new in soul. And so it will be: we shall be changed; we shall live under new conditions of existence. Mortality will give place to immortality. This corruptible frame of ours shall become incorruptible.

III. But our text tells us how this is to be. It explains how all this is to be accomplished: "And He that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new." All this must be God's work, God's work in our hearts. The work is a gradual work: it has its beginning, and its middle, and its end. The work will be finished in heaven, but it must begin here on earth. Here it is imperfect and incomplete; here it is a painful work, a work of toil and difficulty. In heaven it shall be finished, quite perfect, quite complete; for we shall be like Him, like Him for ever.

E. V. Hall, The Waiting Saviour, p. 103.


A New Creation.

A religion which professes to claim the attention and the allegiance of man must show itself to be a religion fitted for man. It must be capable of satisfying his legitimate and innocent instincts. It is perfectly true that the very idea of a religion is this: that it is to repress man's vices and to educate within him holier desires; but it is also true that if religion appears at all, it must appear capable of satisfying his legitimate and his innocent instincts. And one of the features of the Christian faith is pre-eminently this. It is not merely one which sets itself in utter and irreconcilable antagonism to all that savours of sin or of vice in man, but it does not seek to distort human nature; it does not seek to turn man from what is natural to him. It is not merely antagonistic to evil, but it is also capable of developing good, because it comes to man, and dealing with man as he is, it proclaims to him the duty of an entire self-control.

I. There are several instincts which, as intimated in the text, the Christian religion will satisfy. What are these instincts? It has been often said that we are creatures of the present; that is, that our life is bounded by that little moment which we call "now." The past—that has slipped from our grasp; the future—it is not yet ours; and all of that which we can call life, which is really in our possession, is simply the present moment of time. This is perfectly true if by it we understand that our opportunities are limited to the present; but it is utterly untrue if it means that man can be for ever isolated from the past, or ever removed in anticipation from the future. We are bound to the past by the law of reminiscence; we are bound to the future by the law of hope. Though memory may be stronger in age, and hope may be stronger in youth, yet the two instincts of hope and memory walk side by side with us from the very cradle to the grave; and no religion which is worthy of the name can dare to come before man unless it satisfies these two instincts. The religion of the Master satisfies both. The words of the text seem to incorporate that which will satisfy both our longing after the past and our glorious anticipation of the future, when One who, sitting upon the throne of the universe, cries out to men who are sinking under the agony of despair as they find things withering at their touch, "Behold, I make all things new." It satisfies the instinct of hope.

II. But is this all? There is the other instinct. It is the love of the things old. It is that which memory so constantly pleads for; and do the words which seem to speak of newness satisfy that also? Christ does not say, "Behold, I make all things utterly unlike what they are; I make you a new heaven and a new earth." He surely never means that He does violence to the instinct which makes us cling to the things old. He means that He will put back the freshness of youth without robbing us of the love of memory; He means that He will give us back the suppleness and the power of the old early days, but He will not rob us of that which is dear and familiar to us. One of the grandest things in the whole of this book of Revelation is the way in which it preserves, so to speak, the contact of Christian minds with the past.

Bishop Boyd-Carpenter, Penny Pulpit, New Series, No. 1037.

References: Revelation 21:5.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xxxi., No. 1816; G. W. McCree, Christian World Pulpit, vol. x., p. 168. Revelation 21:6.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xxvi., No. 1549; Homilist, 3rd series, vol. i., p. 107; Preacher's Monthly, vol. v., p. 50; Homiletic Magazine, vol. xiv., p. 113; H. P. Liddon, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxx., p. 353.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/revelation-21.html.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 21:6. τὸ ἄλφα καὶ τὸ ω, ἀρχὴ καὶ τὸ τέλος) A glorious title of God. The former clause is explained by the latter.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-21.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And he said unto me, It is done; the world is at an end, and all my threatenings against my enemies, and promises to my people, are now fulfilled, in the eternal damnation of the one, and deliverance and salvation of the other.

I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end: I first made the world, and I have put a period to it. I first gave out those promises and threatenings, and I have now fulfilled them.

I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely; and my people who have thirsted after my righteousness and salvation, now have it freely, and shall drink, and drink abundantly.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-21.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Альфа и Омега См. пояснение к 1:8.

жаждущему Небеса принадлежат тем, кто, зная, что их души иссушены грехом, настойчиво искали утешения в спасении и вечной жизни (ср. Пс. 41:2, 3; Ис. 55:1, 2; Ин. 7:37, 38).

воды живой Ср. 7:17; 22:1, 17. Вечная духовная вода, о которой говорил Иисус (Ин. 4:13, 14; 7:37, 38; ср. Ис. 55:1, 2).

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-21.html.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And he said unto me, They are come to pass I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.

And he said unto me ... God continues to speak. Dummelow understood this as a reference to Revelation 21:5.[15] The creation of all things new is here referred to as a past event, by the prophetic tense, showing that it is as certain to happen as if it had already occurred.

I am the Alpha and the Omega, ... "As the book opens, so it closes, with the solemn assurance of the certainty and unchangeableness of God's eternal promises (Revelation 1:8)."[16]

I will give ... of the water of life ... Roberson compiled a list of the promises in Revelation to those who overcome:[17]

To eat of the tree of life (Revelation 2:7).

Not to be hurt of the second death (Revelation 2:11).

To eat of the hidden manna (Revelation 2:17).

To receive a white stone with a new name (Revelation 2:17).

To have authority over the nations (Revelation 2:26).

To receive the morning star (Revelation 2:26).

To be arrayed in white garments (Revelation 3:5).

Not to have his name blotted out of the book of life (Revelation 3:5).

To have his name confessed before God and the angels (Revelation 3:5).

To be made a pillar in the temple of God (Revelation 3:12).

To have a new name written upon him (Revelation 3:12).

To sit down with God in his throne (Revelation 3:21).

To drink the water of life freely (Revelation 21:7).

To be God's son and to have God for his God (Revelation 21:7).SIZE>

[15] J. R. Dummelow, Commentary on the Holy Bible (New York: The Macmillan Company, 1937), p. 1090.

[16] A. Plummer, op. cit., p. 510.

[17] Charles H. Roberson. Studies in Revelation (Tyler, Texas: P. D. Wilmeth, P.O. Box 3305,1957), p. 200.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-21.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The one sitting on the throne resumed speaking. The judgments of the Tribulation (cf. Revelation 16:17) and of the whole old creation stood accomplished (cf. Revelation 21:5). He again referred to Himself as the eternal, sovereign God ( Revelation 1:8; cf. Revelation 22:13), the originator and terminator of all things (cf. Isaiah 44:6). His promise of abundant satisfaction for the thirsty is metaphorical, symbolizing His ability to meet the deepest needs of His people ( Revelation 7:17; cf. Isaiah 55:1; John 4:13-14; John 7:37-39). Contrast the cup from which the harlot drank ( Revelation 17:4; Revelation 18:3). This is an invitation to anyone, including believers, to come to God to receive what is truly satisfying from Him freely. It is a beautiful gospel invitation (cf. Revelation 3:20; Revelation 22:17).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-21.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 21:6. The voice of God is continued, as He says, They, i.e. the words of Revelation 21:5, are come to pass. The future for which the saints of God have longed, and of which the prophets spoke, has come. All expectations are fulfilled; all hopes are realized; the end to which all things pointed is reached. Hence, accordingly, the close connexion of the next words with these, I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. God is the unchangeable, the everlasting, One; the first cause, the last end, of all things. He must finish that new creation for the coming of which the sins and sorrows of the world have been only the preparatory throes.

I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely. These words are neither a call nor a promise to labouring and heavy-laden ones in search of rest, and they find their parallel in the words of John 4:14 rather than of John 7:37. Those spoken of have already drunk of the living water, and been refreshed by it. Not the longing after salvation, but the longing for a continued and ever deepening participation in its blessings, is expressed by the word ‘athirst.’ The redeemed not only find their first life in Christ: they draw from Him continually those ever fresh supplies of grace by which they are sustained in spiritual life and joy.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-21.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

It is done. The state of Christ's Church on earth, and in this world, is now finished; and the time is come to reward the good, and to punish the wicked in the lake burning with fire and brimstone, in hell, with the devils for all eternity. (Witham) --- This living water is God himself, of which the saints shall be inebriated at the source; i.e. in God himself. Enviable moment, when all the designs of God upon Jesus Christ and upon his Church will be accomplished: but how little thought of now! And how can we hope to be inebriated at this source of God above, if we do not aspire after it whilst we are in this dreary desert here below? He who begins and finishes gratuitously here below the work of our faith, crowns it still more liberally in heaven.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/revelation-21.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

unto = to.

It is done. The texts read "They are come to pass". Compare Revelation 16:17.

Alpha, &c. See Revelation 1:8.

Beginning. App-172.

End. Compare App-125.

life. App-170.

freely. See John 15:25.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-21.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.

It is done - come to pass. The same Greek as Revelation 16:17. So Vulgate; but A, 'they (these words, Revelation 21:5) are come to pass.' All is as sure as if actually fulfilled; for it rests on God's unchanging word. When the consummation shall be, God shall rejoice over His work, as at the first creation God saw everything that He had made, and behold it was very good. Alpha and Omega. In A B, 'the Alpha ... the Omega' (Revelation 1:8).

Give unto ... athirst ... water of life - (Isaiah 12:3; Isaiah 55:1; John 4:13-14; John 7:37-38; Revelation 22:17): added lest any should despair of attaining this exceeding weight of glory. Now we may drink of the stream, then we shall drink at the Fountain.

Freely - `gratuitously;' the same [ doorean (Greek #1432)] as is translated, "(They hated me) without a cause" (John 15:25). As gratuitous as was man's hatred of God, so gratuitous is God's love to man: there was every cause in Christ why man should love, yet man hated Him; there was every cause in man why (humanly speaking) God should hate, yet God loved man. Even in heaven, our drinking at the Fountain shall be God's gratuitous gift.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-21.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) And he said unto me, It is done.—Or, rather, They (the things promised) have come to pass. He spake, and it was done. The assurance is made trebly sure. “I am making all things new.” “These words are true.” “They are fulfilled.” “Twice,” says Bengel, “twice it is said in this book ‘It is done.’ First at the completion of the wrath of God in Revelation 16:17, and here again at the making of all things new.”

I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end . . .—The definite article must be placed before Alpha and Omega. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. He is the Alpha and Omega, whose words are faithful and true, and He is the beginning and the end, who is before all things and by whom all things consist (Colossians 1:17; John 1:1). He finishes as well as begins. He who begins the good work will perform it (Philippians 1:6; Colossians 1:20); all grace flows from Him; and all love flows back to Him, who is Love, who is the cause and end of all, who first makes us, and lastly makes us rest in Him. All the unsatisfied yearnings of the heart may find satisfaction in Him. Hence, perhaps, this promise, I to him that thirsteth will give out of the spring of the water of life freely. No promise shall fail—the needy and thirsty so often invited to Him may find fresh springs of life in Him. (Comp. Isaiah 55:1; John 4:10-14; John 7:37-38.) The blessing is promised freely, as an unbought gift, without money and without price. This is the genius of the good news of God—the gift is free to all. He who understands this will not be afraid to say, “Nothing in my hand I bring;” and he who says this will be he who will also say, “What things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ,” so that he who brings everything brings nothing; and he who brings nothing brings everything, knowing that all is nothing.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-21.html. 1905.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

6. And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely--21:6.

With the proclamation it is done the vision proper concerning the church in tribulation had ended, and the Revelation had ended, and the Revelation was ready to assume the new aspect of the church in the glory of victory rather than in the defeat of persecution. God and Christ are the Alpha and Omega because they are the beginning and the end in creation and in salvation, and here in the promises made to the churches, in faithfulness to finish what had begun. It meant that the vision was completed and the things envisioned would be fulfilled. When God said in the beginning, Let there be light--there was light; and of everything that God said in creation, it was done. The accomplishment of the things envisioned in the apocalypse rested upon the eternal being of God and Christ whose "word is true from the beginning and whose righteous judgments endureth forever" (Psalms 119:160); and the voice which John heard represented it all as having been done--God's word was sure.

The inducement offered to all to drink from the fountain of the water of life freely was the gospel invitation, to all the thirsty people under the blight of heathenism in the land, to come to the fountain of the living waters Christianity-- there was unrestrained liberty to preach salvation and unhindered access to its blessings to all men. It was a restatement and a reproclamation of the Saviour's precious invitation: "Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me . . . for my yoke is easy, and my burden is light." (Matthew 11:28-30) The word yoke signified government, and the Lord's words were chosen for the comparison of his righteous rule in the hearts of men with the tyrannical rule of the Caesars; and of his power to save men from sin with the dark and despairing hopelessness of heathenism. This vision of the new Jerusalem in the new world of liberation from the evil powers was the offer of gospel blessings to the whole world.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-21.html. 1966.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.
It is
16:17
I am
1:8,11,17; 22:13
I will
7:17; 22:17; Isaiah 12:3; 55:1-3; John 4:10,14; 7:37,38
the fountain
Psalms 36:9; Jeremiah 2:13; Joel 3:18
freely
Hosea 14:4; Romans 3:24; 8:32; 1 Corinthians 2:12; 3:5,12,21; 1 John 5:4,5
Reciprocal: Genesis 1:1 - God;  Numbers 21:16 - Gather;  Deuteronomy 30:20 - thy life;  Psalm 23:2 - leadeth;  Psalm 81:10 - open;  Psalm 87:7 - all my;  Proverbs 14:27 - a fountain;  Proverbs 25:25 - cold;  Isaiah 41:17 - seek;  Isaiah 43:20 - to give;  Isaiah 44:3 - pour water;  Jeremiah 17:13 - forsaken;  Ezekiel 39:8 - it is come;  Micah 5:2 - whose;  Zechariah 13:7 - the man;  John 1:1 - the beginning;  John 3:34 - for God;  John 5:26 - so hath;  John 15:25 - without;  Acts 3:15 - Prince;  Romans 11:36 - of him;  1 Corinthians 15:45 - a quickening;  Philippians 2:6 - thought;  Colossians 1:18 - the beginning;  1 Timothy 6:13 - who quickeneth

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-21.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 21:6. — "And He said to me, It is done." Note the change of tense. In verses 5 and 6 the word said occurs three times, but in the second instance it reads saith or says (R.V.). The two emphatic declarations — all things new, and it is done — are just what one would expect. The first is God's decree; the second its accomplishment.

"It is done" is verbally repeated in Revelation 16:17. The connection, however, is different. In the earlier reference the wrath of God is completed; in our text it is the permanent settlement of the eternal state that is in question; in the former, too, an angel is the speaker; here it is the voice of God that is heard.

GREATNESS OF THE SPEAKER.

6. — "I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end."{*In Revelation 1:8 Jehovah, the Almighty, is "The Alpha and the Omega," in Revelation 21:6 it is God simply as such, no dispensational reference as in the earlier quotation, while in Revelation 22:13 it is Christ Who is "The Alpha and the Omega." In each case the divine Being uses the title of Himself. In Revelation 1:11 the words should be deleted.} The first and last letters of the Greek alphabet, followed by the explanatory phrase, "the beginning and the end," intimates that all testimony on earth had its origin in God, as its end is His glory. Creation, providence, promise, history, prediction, prophecy, testimony, love, and grace have each their source in God and in Him their end. Nothing really on the divine side ends in failure. God is seen to triumph at the end. The administration of these things on earth shows, as was the divine intention, the weakness and imperfection of the creature; but that in no wise hinders or thwarts the ultimate purpose of God. The manifestation of Himself in moral glory is the end.

I GIVE.

6. — We greatly love the sentence which follows: "I will give to him that thirsts of the fountain of the water of life freely." This is present; not future. Neither hunger nor thirst shall be felt in the "new Heaven" and "new earth." The "splendid array of negatives" (v. 4) forbids the thought of thirsty ones in the eternal state, save in the lake of fire. The heart of God overflows in pity and tenderness towards the needy and unsatisfied sons and daughters of men. The "fountain," the source of life itself, is promised to the thirsty. It is God's gift, and freely given, as are all His gifts (Isaiah 55:1).

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-21.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

It is done is the same thing that was said as reported at Revelation 16:17. The expression signifies that everything planned by the Lord and predicted for the period up to the point at hand has been accomplished. Alpha and Omega are the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet and the phrase is used symbolically, signifying that Jesus has been connected with all things done by his Father throughout. The same truth is meant by the following phrase, the beginning and the end. I will give, etc. Having completed everthing necessary for the redemption and glorification of Prayer of Manasseh, He is prepared to offer the benefit of the plan to humanity. It will be freely means not only that it is not something that can be purchased with silver and gold, but also that it will be supplied in abundance. Another condition that should be noticed is the offer is made to those who are athirst. The Lord"s favors have always been offered on such a condition. Jesus said ( Matthew 5:6), "Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness for they shall be filled." He also specified in the great invitation to "come unto me" that He meant those who were "heavy laden." There is nothing selfish or arbitrary about this, for only those who sincerely desire the water of life would relish its tastes if they even attempted to drink it.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-21.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 21:6

Revelation 21:6 And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely.

It is done;

that Isaiah, the seventh trumpet is sounded. { Revelation 11:15} The seventh vial of the last plagues is poured out upon Babylon, { Revelation 16:17} all is performed and fulfilled. Now the mystery of God is finished. { Revelation 10:7} Christ, who was the Alpha or beginning of the creation of God, by whom all things were made, { Colossians 1:15-18} is now the Omega or end; that Isaiah, the finisher of all things, of the new heaven and the new earth, even he that maketh all things new.

I will give unto him that is a thirst, of the fountain of the water of life freely.

Blessed are they that hunger and thirst after righteousness. Matthew 5:6; Isaiah 55:1-3; Revelation 22:17 They shall be filled, satisfied with the water of life and salvation. { Isaiah 12:3}

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-21.html.

D.S. Clark's Commentary on Revelation

V:6. "And he (God) said unto me, it is done." This expression "it is done" has been used elsewhere in Revelation, where something has been brought to culmination. The meaning is that God has wrought out his purpose in saving his people, and here is the consummation; here is the climax of the long process of redemption. He has brought them home, he dwells among them, they are his people and he is their God. "It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely." — fitting consummation of the story of redemption.

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Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 21:6. And he said to me, It is done. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give to him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely. After the interruption by the angel the discourse is again resumed of him, who sits on the throne. He said to me. What was said by him that sat on the throne in Revelation 21:5, was also spoken for John. The express addition of the to me here is explained by the hortatory character of the termination of the discourse in Revelation 21:7-8. In John the church is addressed.

Bengel: "Twice it is said in this book, It is done. First at the completion of the wrath of God in ch. Revelation 16:17, and here again at the making of all things new." The more exact import is here, as in ch. Revelation 16:17, furnished by the connection, which shows that the subject here discussed has respect to the world's regeneration, according to which nothing more remains to be wished for by believers, and which is the completion of the whole work of God. What as to the reality was still future is spoken of as already done in respect to the vision, which addresses itself to the spiritual eye, and in which the future appears as immediately present. The new heaven and the new earth are spoken of as already come at Revelation 21:1, and in Revelation 21:2, Jerusalem is seen coming down. The Alpha and the Omega indicate, that in the beginning God made the heaven and the earth, as in ch. Revelation 14:7, also, reference is made to the creation. The Omega and the end are to be accented, as being what is chiefly respected here, (comp. at ch. Revelation 1:8). Not merely so as, but also because God is the Alpha and the beginning, he is also the Omega and the end; and that he really is so, is made manifest by this corresponding renewal of creation. It is done (it was so), was the word uttered in the beginning after every creative act; and the same, It is done, is repeated now at the end, in regard to the work of renewal. Daring the intermediate space it often appears, as if God's purpose were frustrated, as if he had departed from it. But the end reverts to the beginning. And this being the case, the servants of God must not faint. The middle should not vex those, who are sure in respect to the end. God is himself called the beginning and the end, because, as the beginning, so also the end yields him unconditional obedience, his decrees are assuredly carried into effect, on all the seal of his nature is impressed, all bears witness to his glory. There is a corresponding passage in 1 Corinthians 15:28, where, with like meaning, it is said, God will at last be all in all. Vitringa gives the meaning wrong, thus: God will in the end glorionsly fulfil the promises which he gave to his church at the beginning. In that case, God himself could not be called the beginning and the end. The words, "I will give to him that is athirst," etc., find their explanation in what has been remarked on ch. Revelation 7:17, comp. also Revelation 22:17. The thirsting are those who are in need of salvation; the water of life denotes salvation. The freely, without his own doing and labouring, is from Isaiah 55:1, where it is said, in reference to the Messiah's salvation, the final accomplishment of which is brought in here, "Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters, and he that hath no money; come ye, buy and eat; yea come, buy wine and milk without money and without price." Jesus himself alludes to that passage of Isaiah in the Gospel of John, John 7:37, "If any man thirst, let him come to me and drink," a declaration which, as already remarked by Vitringa, shall find its most glorious fulfilment at the time here referred to. All that is here said to ennoble the period, when God makes all things new, is at the same time an evidence of poverty in respect to the thousand years' reign, which belongs to the old world. In it still the thirsty did not drink to satisfaction from the fountain of the water of life. Sadness and longing continue even in it to be the inseparable accompaniments of the state of believers.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-21.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6.And he—The sitter upon the throne.

It is done—The great plan and work of redemption are completed.

Alpha and Omega—Without a beginning or ending, he is the origin and completion of all things, as of this great plan.

I will give—The divine speaker in these two verses describes the past and settled, in terms of the future: that is, he places himself at the origin, when the conditions of salvation were laid, utters them in the future tense, and thereby describes the fulfillment that has now and forever taken place. So in Revelation 18:4-21, (where see notes,) the accomplished fall of Babylon is described in the future tense.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-21.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

“Tis done, all is over” (sc. or ). The perfecting of God’s work is followed, as in Isaiah 54-56, by a liberal promise of satisfaction to all spiritual desire, and the three ideas of consolation, eternal refreshment, and Divine fellowship are thus conjoined as in Revelation 7:14-17. Compare the fontal passage in Philo, de migrat Abr. § 6 , , . , . The promise implies (like Isaiah 44:3, not Isaiah 55:1) that thirst is accompanied by readiness and eagerness to accept the boon, which is free (6) and full ( ) and filial (Revelation 21:7). The thirst fox God is opposed to the unbelief and vice which quench it, just as the victorious life is contrasted with the craven spirit which shrinks from the hardships and demands of faith. Similarly the life of strenuous obedience now enters on its majority; it comes into an estate of filial confidence to the great God, bestowed on all who acquit themselves nobly in their probation. By a rare touch (since Revelation 3:22) in the Apocalypse, the individual Christian is singled out. Usually the writer is interested in the general body of Christians. Here, however, as in 2–3, religious individualism aptly follows the idea of personal promise and encouragement (cf.Revelation 22:17), as afterwards of judgment (Revelation 22:11-12).

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 21:6". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-21.html. 1897-1910.