Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 3:16

So because you are lukewarm, and neither hot nor cold, I will spit you out of My mouth.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Backsliders;   Church;   Instability;   Laodicea;   Lukewarmness;   Wicked (People);   Scofield Reference Index - Apostasy;   Kingdom;   The Topic Concordance - Chastisement;   Coming;   Government;   Hearing;   Indifference;   Jesus Christ;   Love;   Rebuke;   Throne;   Victory/overcoming;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Devotedness to God;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Laodicea;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Lukewarmness;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Archippus;   Laodicea;   Philadelphia;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Asia Minor, Cities of;   Laodicea;   Lukewarm;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Archippus;   Asia;   Laodicea;   Magi;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Arts;   Eye;   Laodicea;   Lukewarm;   Mouth Lips;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Cakes;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Sepharvaim;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Laodice'a;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Lukewarm;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Colossians, Epistle to the;   Revelation of John:;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for December 24;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Because thou art lukewarm - Irresolute and undecided.

I will spue thee out of my mouth - He alludes here to the known effect of tepid water upon the stomach; it generally produces a nausea. I wilt cast thee off. Thou shalt have no interest in me. Though thou hast been near to my heart, yet now I must pluck thee thence, because slothful, careless, and indolent; thou art not in earnest for thy soul.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

So then because thou art lukewarm … I will spue thee out of my mouth - Referring, perhaps, to the well-known fact that tepid water tends to produce sickness at the stomach, and an inclination to vomit. The image is intensely strong, and denotes deep disgust and loathing at the indifference which prevailed in the church at Laodicea. The idea is, that they would be utterly rejected and cast off as a church - a threatening of which there has been an abundant fulfillment in subsequent times. It may be remarked, also, that what was threatened to that church may be expected to occur to all churches, if they are in the same condition; and that all professing Christians, and Christian churches, that are lukewarm, have special reason to dread the indignation of the Saviour.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-3.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

So because thou art lukewarm, and neither hot nor cold, I will spew thee out of my mouth.

Neither hot nor cold ... The contrast is between the hot medicinal waters of Hieropolis, and the cold pure waters of Colossae."[66] Thus, the church was providing neither refreshment for the spiritually weary, nor healing for the spiritually sick.

I will spew thee out of my mouth ... This is a shocking figure, but one of the most expressive in the New Testament. Strangers entering Laodicea for the first time, when they tried to drink where the hot spring water and the cold came together, would usually "spew it out."

ENDNOTE:

[66] Robert H. Mounce, op. cit., p. 125.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot,.... A lukewarm professor is one that serves God and mammon; that halts between two opinions, and knows not what religion is best, and cares little for any, yet keeps in a round of duty, though indifferent to it, and contents himself with it; and is un concerned about the life and power of godliness, and takes up with the external form of it; and has no thought about the glory of God, the interest of Christ and truth; and this was too much the case of this church, at least of a great number of its members; wherefore it was very loathsome to Christ, hence he threatens:

I will spew thee out of my mouth; this shows how nauseous lukewarmness is to Christ, insomuch that on account of it he would not own and acknowledge her as his; but even cast her out, unchurch her, and have no more any such imperfect church state upon earth, as he afterwards never will, this is the last; nor is there any church state, or any remains of one in Laodicea; it is indeed quite uninhabited.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-3.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

neither cold nor hot — So one oldest manuscript, B, and Vulgate read. But two oldest manuscripts, Syriac, and Coptic transpose thus, “hot nor cold.” It is remarkable that the Greek adjectives are in the masculine, agreeing with the angel, not feminine, agreeing with the Church. The Lord addresses the angel as the embodiment and representative of the Church. The chief minister is answerable for his flock if he have not faithfully warned the members of it.

I willGreek, “I am about to,” “I am ready to”: I have it in my mind: implying graciously the possibility of the threat not being executed, if only they repent at once. His dealings towards them will depend on theirs towards Him.

spue thee out of my month — reject with righteous loathing, as Canaan spued out its inhabitants for their abominations. Physicians used lukewarm water to cause vomiting. Cold and hot drinks were common at feasts, but never lukewarm. There were hot and cold springs near Laodicea.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-3.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Lukewarm (χλιαροςchliaros). Tepid. Old adjective from χλιωchliō to liquefy, to melt, here alone in N.T.

I will (μελλωmellō). “I am about to,” on the point of.

Spew thee (σε εμεσαιse emesai). First aorist active infinitive of εμεωemeō old verb to vomit, to reject with extreme disgust, here alone in N.T.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-3.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Lukewarm ( χλιαρός )

Only here in the New Testament.

Foremost and most numerous among the lost, Dante places those who had been content to remain neutral in the great contest between good and evil.

“Master, what is this which now I hear?

What folk is this, which seems by pain so vanquished?

And he to me: “This miserable mode

Maintain the melancholy souls of those

Who lived withouten infamy or praise.

Commingled are they with that caitiff choir.

Of angels, who have not rebellious been,

Nor faithful were to God, but were for self.

The heavens expelled them, not to be less fair;

Nor them the nethermore abyss receives,

For glory none the damned would have from them.”

Inferno,” iii., 33-42.

I will ( μέλλω )

I am about or have in mind. Not a declaration of immediate and inexorable doom, but implying a possibility of the determination being changed.

Spue ( ἐμέσαι )

Only here in the New Testament. Compare Leviticus 18:28; Leviticus 20:22.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-3.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth.

So because thou art lukewarm — The effect of lukewarm water is well known.

I am about to spue thee out of my mouth — I will utterly cast thee from me; that is, unless thou repent.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-3.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

This mode of expression is only intended to express in a striking manner the displeasure of God against lukewarmness in his friends. We are by no means to understand from it that it is literally better to be open enemies. Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus appear to have been timid and hesitating friends of Jesus; but their sin in not being more decided, was not as great as that of open enemies; and so Felix and Agrippa were not as guilty as Caiaphas and Herod And, in modern times, we find that those who regard the Institution, and truths of religion with the most friendly and respectful feelings, constitute the class from which, ordinarily, the greatest number of conversions to true Christianity take place. We are, therefore, clearly to understand this passage only as a pointed and antithetical manner of conveying the general idea that lukewarmness and indifference in the cause of Christ are very sinful, and highly displeasing to God.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/revelation-3.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

16 So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth.

Ver. 16. I will spue thee out] I will please myself in thy just punishment. Ah (saith God, as one ridding his stomach), "I will ease me of mine adversaries, I will avenge me of mine enemies," Isaiah 1:24. Now the basest places are good enough to cast up our gorge in. The hypocrite’s punishment must needs be heavy. Laodicea is commonly looked upon as a type of England. And surely that facies hypocritica hypocricitical look of our nation is facies hippocratica, a mortal complexion, a sad prognostic.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Revelation 3:16. I will spue thee out of my mouth. The allegory is continued, for lukewarm things, as water, provoke to vomit, according to the observation and prescription of the ancient physicians. See Celsus de Re. Med. lib. 1. 100. 3.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/revelation-3.html. 1801-1803.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 3:16.(53) ΄έλλω σὲ ἐμεσαι) This is a milder form of speech than if it were ἐ΄έσω σέ. ΄έλλω makes a modal(54) form of speech out of a categorical. [He implies the denial which is about to take place, in the event of their continuing “lukewarm,” before His Father; Psalms 16:4.—V. g.]

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-3.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Neither cold nor hot; partly good, partly bad, having something of profession, nothing of the life and power of religion; contenting thyself that thou art not a Jew, nor a pagan; not a superstitious, idolatrous person; but a Christian, a protestant, a minister, or member of the Reformed church; yet neglecting thy duty both as a minister, and as a Christian, living in a sensual satisfaction of thy lusts.

I will spue thee out of my mouth; I will cast thee off, as men vomit up lukewarm things.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-3.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

тепл Иначе – прохладный. Рядом с Лаодикией находились Иераполис, знаменитый своими горячими источниками, и Колоссы, знаменитые холодными, освежающими горными потоками. А в Лаодикии вода из подземного водопровода была грязной и теплой. Приезжие, не привыкшие к такой воде, попробовав, выплевывали ее. Церковь в Лаодикии была ни холодной (т.е. открыто отвергающей Христа), ни горячей, полной духовного рвения. Члены этой церкви были теплыми, т.е. лицемерами, заявляющими, что они знают Христа, но в действительности не принадлежащими Ему (ср. Мф. 7:21 и послед.).

извергну тебя из уст Моих Эти обманывающие себя лицемеры вызывали у Христа такое же отвращение, как и грязная, теплая вода Лаодикии у пытающихся утолить жажду.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-3.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Spew thee out; reject with abhorrence. God abhors indifference in religion no less really than he does open infidelity or open immorality.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-3.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 3:16. Hence the emphatic threatening of this verse. For the figure comp. Leviticus 18:28; Leviticus 20:22.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-3.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

lukewarm. Greek. chliaros. Only here.

will = am about to.

spue. Greek. emeo. Only here. Occurs: Isaiah 19:14 (Septuagint)

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth.

Neither cold nor hot. So A, Vulgate; but 'Aleph (') B C, Syriac, Coptic, transpose, 'hot nor cold.' The adjectives are in the masculine, agreeing with the angel; not with the Church (feminine). The Lord addresses the angel as representing the Church. The chief minister is answerable for his flock, if he had not faithfully warned it.

I will, [ melloo (Greek #3195)] - 'I am about to;' I have it in my mind: implying graciously the possibility of the threat not being executed, if only they repent at once. His dealing toward them will depend on theirs toward Him.

Spue thee out of my mouth reject with righteous loathing as Canaan spued out its inhabitants for their Spue thee out of my mouth - reject with righteous loathing, as Canaan spued out its inhabitants for their abominations (Leviticus 18:28). Physicians used lukewarm water to cause vomiting. Cold and hot drinks were common at feasts: never lukewarm. There were hot and cold springs near Laodicea.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-3.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth.
I will spue thee out
2:5; Jeremiah 14:19; 15:1-4; Zechariah 11:8,9
Reciprocal: Leviticus 18:28 - GeneralDeuteronomy 20:8 - fearful;  Deuteronomy 32:19 - And when;  1 Kings 18:21 - How long;  2 Kings 17:41 - these nations;  Psalm 119:20 - soul;  Psalm 119:81 - fainteth;  Proverbs 1:23 - behold;  Ezekiel 20:39 - but;  Hosea 7:8 - a cake;  Hosea 10:2 - Their heart is divided;  Matthew 12:30 - that is;  Matthew 13:12 - from;  Matthew 25:3 - foolish;  Matthew 25:30 - cast;  Luke 11:23 - GeneralActs 1:2 - through;  Romans 12:11 - fervent;  1 Corinthians 8:3 - is

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-3.html.

Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts and Themes on Revelation

The Charity of the Lord Jesus.

Revelation 3:16.

Matthew 12:30.

Mark 9:40.

"Neither cold nor hot."This first of these texts proclaims as a ruinous sin what many regard as "a mere misfortune which cannot be helped"— lukewarmness.To be neither cold nor hot is an abomination in the sight of Christ, awakening disgust, and leading to entire casting away. It is not lukewarmness occasioned by the cold passing gradually into heat, but that produced by the heat passing into the cold. Once there was warmth; now that warmth and glow are giving way, and the hateful lukewarm condition is coming on. Church of the living God, beware of letting your temperature sink even one single degree. Christian man or woman, watch! Mark your spiritual thermometer; take alarm when it begins to go down, though but a hairbreadth. See that it rises, and rises from day to day.

How loathsome to the great Master is the tasteless, tepid, vapid Christianity of multitudes in our day! One can hardly tell what it is, or where it is tending. Neither cold nor hot! Making the best of both worlds; mixing up heaven and earth; a compound of zeal and indifference; a dilution of genuine religion, to such an extent, that the original element has almost disappeared. Alternate folly and wisdom; levity and seriousness; the ball and the prayer-meeting; the concert and the communion; the opera and the committee; the gay evening party and the mother"s meeting or the Sabbath school; the cup of the Lord and the cup of Belial mixed together—such is the condition of things among multitudes who name the name of Christ.

"He who is not with me is against me."Matthew 12:30. This second text points not so much to the lukewarm and half-hearted, as to the deliberately undecided—those who, from prejudice, or fear of man, or love of ease, willfully stand aloof from Christ—while yet not openly joining with His foes. Their conscience says, "Join Christ; follow Him." But there is a lion in the way—they must take up their cross, and deny self; they must incur loss, or hatred, or shame. So they shrink back, all the while defending their indecision, and soothing their consciences with the thought that they do not oppose Christ or His cause. Of such Christ here says, he who is not with us is against us. He that stands aloof—afraid, perhaps, of being called a saint or a bigot, unwilling to commit himself to a life of decided religion, reluctant to come wholly out from the world, or set himself against its opinions and ways—is as if he were an enemy. For no man can serve two masters, or follow two religions. Why are you halting between two opinions? is God"s appeal to such; and Balaam stands in history as the awful specimen of the double-hearted.

"He who is not against us is for us."Mark 9:40. This third text speaks to a very different class from either of these. If Laodicea, with her lukewarmness, is the representative of the first, Philadelphia is the representative of this last—"You have little strength, yet have kept my word, and have not denied my name". How cheering and gracious to the feeble-hearted the Master"s words, "He who is not against us is on our side!" How like him who breaks not the bruised reed, nor quenches the smoking flax! How encouraging are His words, in circumstances in which we might have expected rebuke and sternness! He thus comforts the feeble-minded, supports the weak, and shows His patience toward all men. He accepts the will for the deed; the weak effort for the accomplished fact. If the spirit be willing, he overlooks the weakness of the flesh.

There is one Old Testament character which seems to illustrate this affirmation of our Lord—Abijah, the son of Jeroboam—who is evidently reckoned upon the Lord"s side, and yet all that can be said of him is that there was found in him "some good thing" towards the Lord God of Israel. We may conclude the same respecting the seven thousand who had not bowed the knee to Baal. They had not come out openly—they had been so timid that even Elijah did not know of their existence—yet in silence they had cleaved to Jehovah, and He owns them as His own. They had not been against Him—and He proclaims them as with Him.

How gently the Lord deals with fearful ones! How tender and charitable His judgments! He bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. He heeds the faintest breath that goes up to Him; He despises no petitioner, even the most troubled and timorous.

There are two New Testament characters whose history brings out this—Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea. They are for more than three years very timid witnesses for Christ. One can hardly call them disciples. They do not follow Him; and even when the council plots against Him, all the length they go is, "Does our law condemn a man before he is heard?" Yet they are owned of the Master, and are examples of the gracious truth, ""He who is not against me is for me."" And then what a reward they get! What an honor is put upon them even for this weak protest! They are filled with boldness, and stand forward in behalf of Christ when all others have shrunk back. "The last becomes the first, and the first last."

What grace is this! What tender love and condescension! What a charitable construction our Master puts on all we say or do! He makes the best of everything in our behalf. He puts the kindest possible interpretation on every effort, however faint, put forth for Him; on every word, however feeble, spoken for Him. And even when we speak now words, and do no deeds, if we do not deny Him, He says, "He who is not against me is for me."

What encouragement is this to those who are cast down about their acceptance! They afflict themselves; they write bitter things against themselves; for they fear they are not the Lord"s. O sorrowful doubter, O weary, troubled spirit, hear the Master"s gentle, loving words, "He who is not against me is for me!" He owns your feeble faith, and does not cast you off. And what encouragement to those who are depressed because of their poor, poor work for Him! He thinks more of your work than you do. He is well pleased with that cup of water which you gave to one of His brethren. He owns it now—He will own it hereafter!

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Bonar, Horatius. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Light & Truth: Bible Thoughts and Themes on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bch/revelation-3.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

No parable or illustration should be strained in the application. This one does not teach that God would be pleased at all with one who is cold in his religious praffiices-—that point is not being considered in the least in this illustration. The only idea is with the comparative preference for something cold over a lukewarm article. When we make the application the reason for this preference is evident. If a professed disciple is cold it will be clearly recognized by the world, and he will not have much influence in keeping others from the service of Christ through his example. On the other hand, a lukewarm disciple may be a tolerably good man so that others may admire him. Yet he is not urgent in advising them to be busy in the Master"s service and consequently his influence will be detrimental to the cause of Christ and for that reason he will be rejected. Retaining the same subject matter for his figure, the Lord threatens to treat this church as a man would a piece of food that he took into his mouth and found it had become lukewarm; he will spew (spit) it out of his mouth.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-3.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 3:16

Revelation 3:16 So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth.

So then, because thou art Luke -warm, &c

To be Luke -warm, is a metaphor taken from boiling water that was very hot, but being taken off from the fire, cools and becomes Luke -warm, or else when cold water which hath been set on the fire, and beginning to heat, is Luke -warm, neither cold nor hot: Such were the ministers and members of this Church, who seemed to be religious, had the form of Godliness, but not the power of it, 2 Timothy 3:5

I will spue thee out of my mouth.

Which expression implies, First, That the formality and Luke -warmness of this Church, her elders and members, was very burdensome unto Jesus Christ, Isaiah 1:11; Isaiah 1:15. Secondly, That Christ was heart-sick of those formalists, and their formality in the worship of God, and he was willing to ease himself of them. Ah, I will ease me of my adversaries, and make them as loathsome as that which is vomited up, Habakkuk 2:16. The cup of the Lord's right hand shall be turned unto thee, and shameful spewing shall be on thy glory. Thirdly, That Christ would utterly reject this Church, her ministers and members, for their Luke -warmness, formality, hypocrisy, &c. Zechariah 11:7; Zechariah 11:14

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-3.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 3:16. But because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth. Lukewarm water provokes to spuing. There is nothing more common than for lukewarmness to be cast as a reproach against others by those who are lukewarm in the truth themselves. How many of the orthodox in the seventeenth century acted so! But it not rarely happens with anxious minds, that they regard themselves as lukewarm without actually being so. "One must not always," Bengel remarks, "estimate what they have of the heat of life by their own feelings. A person in a state of bodily health may have a lively heat or warmth in his body, and be himself unconscious of it, while another, who takes him by the hand, readily perceives it. So in spiritual things one, who is accustomed to spiritual ardour, may be without much sensibility, such as may appear somewhat strange and wonderful to another of little experience in the divine life. It belongs also to the fundamental constitution of the soul, that when it burns with a fervent zeal for God, the fire within shall never say: It is enough."

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Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-3.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

16.I will spew—Literally, I am about to spew; implying that the rejection is delayed, perhaps to allow time for repentance, yet is nigh at hand. It seems to be a threat of removal of the Church, implying, but not expressing, individual condemnation for each in the final day.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-3.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 3:16. The divine disgust at lukewarm religion. Christ, says the prophet, is sick of the lukewarm: as the purpose ( ) of rejection does not exclude the possibility of a change upon the part of the church which shall render the execution of the purpose needless, advice to repent immediately follows upon the threat. The latter is unconditional only in form. Exclusion from God’s life forms one side of the penalty, humiliating exposure before men the other (18).

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-3.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

16. I am going to spit you out of my month. Symbolic of intense disgust!

 

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Revelation 3:16". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/revelation-3.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.