Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 8:10

The third angel sounded, and a great star fell from heaven, burning like a torch, and it fell on a third of the rivers and on the springs of waters.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Angel (a Spirit);   Astronomy;   Lamp;   Meteorology and Celestial Phenomena;   Stars;   Vision;   The Topic Concordance - Seals;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Lamps;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Wormwood;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Order;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Wormwood;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Revelation, the Book of;   Torch;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Beast;   Number;   Plagues of Egypt;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Lamp Lampstand;   Numbers;   River ;   Star;   Star (2);   Water ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Wormwood,;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cherubim;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Fell;   Lamp;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Astronomy;   Revelation of John:;   Torch;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

There fell a great star from heaven - This has given rise to various conjectures. Some say the star means Attila and his Huns, others, Genseric with his Vandals falling on the city of Rome; others, Eleazer, the son of Annus, spurning the emperor's victims, and exciting the fury of the Zealots; others, Arius; infecting the pure Christian doctrine with his heresy, etc., etc. It certainly cannot mean all these; and probably none of them. Let the reader judge.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-8.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And the third angel sounded - Indicating, according to the interpretation above proposed, some important event in the downfall of the Roman empire.

And there fell a great star from heaven - A star is a natural emblem of a prince, of a ruler, of one distinguished by rank or by talent. Compare the notes on Revelation 2:28. See Numbers 24:17, and the notes on Isaiah 14:12. A star falling from heaven would be a natural symbol of one who had left a higher station, or of one whose character and course would be like a meteor shooting through the sky.

Burning as it were a lamp - Or, as a torch. The language here is such as would describe a meteor blazing through the air; and the reference in the symbol is to something that would have a resemblance to such a meteor. It is not a lurid meteor (livid, pale, ghastly) that is here referred to, but a bright, intense, blazing star - emblem of fiery energy; of rapidity of movement and execution; of splendor of appearance - such as a chieftain of high endowments, of impetuousness of character, and of richness of apparel, would be. In all languages, probably, a star has been an emblem of a prince whose virtues have shone brightly, and who has exerted a beneficial influence on mankind. In all languages also, probably, a meteor flaming through the sky has been an emblem of some splendid genius causing or threatening desolation and ruin; of a warrior who has moved along in a brilliant but destructive path over the world; and who has been regarded as sent to execute the vengeance of heaven. This usage occurs because a meteor is so bright; because it appears so suddenly; because its course cannot be determined by any known laws; and because, in the apprehensions of people, it is either sent as a proof of the divine displeasure, or is adapted to excite consternation and alarm. In the application of this part of the symbol, therefore, we naturally look for some prince or warrior of brilliant talents, who appears suddenly and sweeps rapidly over the world; who excites consternation and alarm; whose path is marked by desolation, and who is regarded as sent from heaven to execute the divine purposes - who comes not to bless the world by brilliant talents well directed, but to execute vengeance on mankind.

And it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters - On the phrase, “the third part,” see the notes on Revelation 8:7. This reference to the “rivers” and to the “fountains of waters” seems, in part, to be for the purpose of saying that everything would be affected by this series of judgments. In the previous visions the trees and the green grass, the sea and the ships, had been referred to. The rivers and the fountains of waters are not less important than the trees, the grass, and the commerce of the world, and hence this judgment is mentioned as particularly bearing on them. At the same time, as in the case of the other trumpets, there is a propriety in supposing that there would be something in the event referred to by the symbol which would make it more appropriate to use this symbol in this case than in the others. It is natural, therefore, to look for some desolations that would particularly affect the portions of the world where rivers abound, or where they take their rise; or, if it be understood as having a more metaphorical sense, to regard it as affecting those things which resemble rivers and fountains - the sources of influence; the morals, the religion of a people, the institutions of a country, which are often so appropriately compared with running fountains or flowing streams.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-8.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And the third angel sounded, and there fell from heaven a great star, burning as a torch, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of the waters; and the name of the star is called Wormwood: and the third part of the waters became wormwood: and many men died of the waters, because they were made bitter.

The third angel sounded ... Moffatt thought that this part of Revelation came "from Iranian or Mandaean eschatology,"[54] but scholars will continue to fail in their search for the meaning of the New Testament in the writings and folklore of paganism.

There fell from heaven a great star ... Who was he? There are as many answers as there are writers. He has been identified as: the devil, Lucifer, Atilla the Hun, Pelagius, Origen (Luther's opinion), Arius, or Pope Gregory the Great! The futurists think of their antichrist.[55] The simple truth is that this angel is not identifiable with any individual, evil person. "Wormwood, symbolical of bitter sorrow (Lamentations 3:19), is the name of this star (Revelation 8:11)."[56]

Upon rivers and fountains ... How can the waters of rivers and fountains turn into bitter sorrow for people? Ask any one who ever depended upon wells or fountains that dried up, or who ever survived any great flood of a mighty river. The river which once was life and joy to people became their defeat and their execution. What river? Any one of hundreds all over the world.

The rivers of China are a good example of this. The Yangtze Chiang, the Yellow river, also known as the Hwang-ho, and others, cross the mainland of China, descending from the great Tibetan plateau and bearing incredible loads of sediment, the Yangtze Chiang alone depositing over a billion tons of sediment a year[57] and cause incredible flood damages at uncertain intervals. The beds of the rivers are continually being built up by the great sediment load, until finally, the great river strikes out in a new direction, changing course radically, and traversing the most populated area in the world, with the result of the loss of millions of lives and untold property damage. Such floods have been the recurring curse of the Chinese mainland for countless centuries. But this situation is worldwide.

There is nothing new in such recurring calamities; never a day passes without news media reference to such things in one part of the world or another; what is revealed in these trumpet visions is that such things are not "mere accidents of nature." Moreover, they are restrained. Only a minor part of the earth will suffer such things. "The newspapers tell you all about such things,"[58] except that they are God's warnings that people should repent and turn to God. "Four thousand years of recorded history tell of man's repeated failure to avoid the destructiveness of floods."[59] Why? A star named Wormwood has fallen upon the rivers and fountains of earth. Who can deny it?

Some expositors rely upon a spiritual interpretation of these judgments. For example, Hough wrote:

When men turn to wickedness, they tamper with something far more profound than they know. A power comes from above to ruin the very waters upon which the wicked depend for the life they are misusing.[60]

Such a view is true, of course; but we believe that something more tangible is meant.

This turn of earth's waters into bitterness is the opposite of the Old Testament event of making the bitter waters of Marah sweet (Exodus 15:25). When people tire of drinking earth's waters made bitter, may they turn to Christ who is able to make the bitter waters sweet.

The reaction of rebellious minds against these judgments should be noted. Some have spoken sarcastically of God's "killing off large numbers as an object lesson to survivors," and seem to be resentful; but Caird effectively answered such objections thus:

The question mark which death sets over human existence is just as great whether they die soon or late, alone or in company, violently or in their beds. All men must die; and their ultimate destiny is not determined either by the moment or the manner of their death.[61]

[54] James Moffatt, op. cit., p. 405.

[55] R. C. H. Lenski, op. cit., p. 281.

[56] William Hendriksen, op. cit., p. 144.

[57] Encyclopedia Britannica, 1961 edition, Vol. 23, p. 875.

[58] William Hendriksen, op. cit., p. 144.

[59] Encyclopedia Britannica, 1961 edition, Vol. 9, p. 385.

[60] Lynn Harold Hough, The Interpreter's Bible, Vol. XII (New York-Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1957), p. 429.

[61] G. B. Caird, op. cit., p. 113.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-8.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the third angel sounded,.... His trumpet:

and there fell a great star from heaven; not Mahomet, as some think, for this time is too soon for him, who rose up under the fifth trumpet; nor Arius, for whom it is too late, who lived in the times of Constantine; and still less Origen, who lived before his time; but rather Pelagius, who was a man of great eminence in the church, of much learning, and made great pretensions to religion and holiness, and, like a star and lamp, shone forth awhile, with great lustre and splendour, but fell into very great errors; denying original sin, and asserting the purity of human nature, crying up the power of man's free will, and asserting that human nature, without the grace of God, was able to keep the whole law, even to perfection; and his name, according to his doctrine, was wormwood and gall, which embittered the sweet doctrines of the free grace of God, and affected the fountains and rivers, the sacred Scriptures, from whence these doctrines flow; so that instead of being pleasant and wholesome to men, through his false glosses and perverse interpretations of them, they became bitter and poisonous; and many souls, that received and imbibed his sense of them, died spiritually, and were lost and perished, as all must inevitably, who depend on the strength and works of nature, and deny and despise the grace of God: but it is best, as the other trumpets, so to understand this of the invasions of the above barbarous people, particularly the Vandals under Genseric, who being turned out of Spain by the Goths, went into Africa, where peace was made, and part of Africa given them to dwell in; after which Genseric, through treachery, seized upon Carthage, and greatly afflicted Sicily: Theodosius made war against them to no purpose, and peace being made between Valentinian and Genseric, Africa was divided between them; and some time after Rome was spoiled by Genseric of all its richesF18Cassiodor. Chronicon in Theodos. 44. & in Marcian. 45. . Mr. Daubuz thinks Attila, king of the Huns, called the dread of the world, and the scourge of God, is meant by this star; who was a rebel against the Romans, and made sad ravages in the empire; at the beginning of which troubles a great comet appeared; and, according to CassiodorusF19Chronicon, ib. , the Huns were auxiliaries to the Romans against the Goths; but Litorius the Roman general was taken; and after this the Huns rebelled, and depopulated Thrace and Illyricum; and Attila, their king, having slain his brother Bleda, and partner, became sole monarch; and though the Romans under Actius, by the help of the Goths, beat him in the fields of Catalaun, and obliged him to depart, yet afterwards, having got a reinforcement, he entered with great force into Aquileia, with whom Pope Leo made peace:

burning as it were a lamp; this star resembled that which is called Lampadias, which Pliny saysF20Nat. Hist. l. 2. c. 25. imitates, or bears a likeness to burning torches; and he speaks of a spark which fell out of a star, which had such an appearanceF21lb. c. 35. : this is expressive of war, and great destruction in the empire:

and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of water; that is, upon the large provinces and chief cities belonging to the Roman empire, and the governors of them, who suffered very bitterly and severely in these times; compare with this Ezekiel 32:2. The last clause, "and upon the fountains of waters", is left out in the Alexandrian copy.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-8.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

7 And the third angel sounded, and there fell a great star from heaven, burning as it were a lamp, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters;

(7) The third execution on the floods and fountains, that is, on all fresh water, in this verse: the effect of which is, that many are destroyed by the bitterness of the water, in the verse following.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-8.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

a lampa torch.

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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-8.html. 1871-8.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

10. When the third sounds his trumpet, a flaming star, called “wormwood,” falls on the rivers and fountains of water.

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Godbey, William. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/revelation-8.html.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Burning as a torch (καιομενος ως λαμπαςkaiomenos hōs lampas). See Revelation 4:5; Matthew 2:2, perhaps a meteor, striking at the fresh-water supply (rivers ποταμωνpotamōn springs πηγαςpēgas) as in the first Egyptian plague also.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-8.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Lamp ( λαμπὰς )

Rev., torch. See on Revelation 4:5.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-8.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And the third angel sounded, and there fell a great star from heaven, burning as it were a lamp, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters;

And the third angel sounded, and there fell from heaven a great star, and it fell on the third part of the rivers — It seems Afric is meant by the rivers; (with which this burning part of the world abounds in an especial manner;) Egypt in particular, which the Nile overflows every year far and wide. ln the whole African history, between the irruption of the barbarous nations into the Roman empire, and the ruin of the western empire, after the death of Valentinian the Third, there is nothing more momentous than the Arian calamity, which sprung up in the year315. It is not possible to tell how many persons, particularly at Alexandria, in all Egypt, and in the neighbouring countries, were destroyed by the rage of the Arians. Yet Afric fared better than other parts of the empire, with regard to the barbarous nations, till the governor of it, whose wife was a zealous Arian, and aunt to Genseric, king of the Vandals, was, under that pretence, unjustly accused before the empress Placidia. He was then prevailed upon to invite the Vandals into Afric; who under Genseric, in the year428, founded there a kingdom of their own, which continued till the year533. Under these Vandal kings the true believers endured all manner of afflictions and persecutions. And thus Arianism was the inlet to all heresies and calamities, and at length to Mahometanism itself. This great star was not an angel, (angels are not the agents in the two preceding or the following trumpet,) but a teacher of the church, one of the stars in the right hand of Christ. Such was Arius. He fell from on high, as it were from heaven, into the most pernicious doctrines, and made in his fall a gazing on all sides, being great, and now burning as a torch. He fell on the third part of the rivers - His doctrine spread far and wide, particularly in Egypt.

And on the fountains of water — wherewith Afric abounds.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-8.html. 1765.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

10.] And the third angel blew his trumpet, and there fell from heaven a great star burning as a lamp, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers and upon the fountains of the waters (it can hardly be said, as Düsterd., that we are here as matter of course to understand, on the third part of the fountains, any more than we are to limit the πᾶς χόρτος χλωρός in Revelation 8:7 to all the grass within the third part of the earth). And the name of the star is called Wormwood (the more usual forms are τὸ ἀψίνθιον, or ἡ ἄψινθος. The masc. seems to be chosen on account of its conformity to ὁ ἀστήρ. There is a river in Thrace so called. See on the plant, and its medicinal use by the ancients, Winer, Realw. art. Wermuth: and Pliny, xxvii. 28), and the third part of the waters became (was turned into, see reff.) wormwood: and many of the men (who dwelt by these waters: such may be the force of the article. But τῶν ἀνθρ. may be general. It is the only place where the expression πολλ. τῶν ἀνθρ. occurs) died from ( ἐκ of the source whence a result springs, see Winer, edn. 6, § 47, sub voce) the waters, because they were embittered (compare the converse history, Exodus 15:23 ff., of the bitter waters being made sweet by casting a certain tree into them: see also 2 Kings 2:19 ff. The question whether wormwood was a deadly poison or not, is out of place here. It is not said that all who drank, died. And the effect of any bitter drug, however medicinally valuable, being mixed with the water ordinarily used, would be to occasion sickness and death. It is hardly possible to read of this third plague, and not to think of the deadly effect of those strong spirituous drinks which are in fact water turned into poison. The very name absinthe is not unknown in their nomenclature: and there is no effect which could be so aptly described by the falling of fire into water, as this, which results in ardent spirit,—in that which the simple islanders of the South Sea call firewater. That this plague may go on to destroy even this fearful proportion of the ungodly in the latter days, is far from impossible, considering its prevalence even now in some parts of the civilized world. But I mention this rather as an illustration, than as an interpretation).

And the fourth angel blew his trumpet: and the third part of the sun was struck (it is not said, as in the case of the former three trumpets, with what. And this absence of an instrument in the fourth of these correlative visions perhaps teaches us not to attribute too much import to the instruments by which the previous judgments are brought about. It is the πληγή itself, not its instrument, on which attention should be directed) and the third part of the moon and the third part of the stars, that the third part of them might be darkened, and the day might not shine during the third part of it (the limitation of the τὸ τρίτον is now manifestly to time, not to brightness. So E. V. rightly, “for a third part of it.” That this consequence is no natural one following upon the obscuration of a third portion of the sun, &c., is not to be alleged as any objection, but belongs to the altogether supernatural region in which these visions are situated. Thus we have a globe of fire turning sea-water to blood—a burning star embittering the waters: &c.), and the night in like manner (i. e. the night as far as she is, by virtue of the moon and stars, a time of light. And this is far more so under the glorious Eastern moon and stars, than in our mist-laden climate).

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/revelation-8.html. 1863-1878.

Scofield's Reference Notes

angel (See Scofield "Hebrews 1:4")

star Cf. Revelation 9:1; Isaiah 14:12 contra, Daniel 12:3

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Revelation 8:10". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/revelation-8.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

10 And the third angel sounded, and there fell a great star from heaven, burning as it were a lamp, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters;

Ver. 10. There fell a great star] Falling stars were never but meteors. That grand apostate of Rome may well he meant by this blazing, burning comet. He was in falling by degrees from the time of Constantine till Phocas, who sat upon the chair of pestilence.

Burning as it were a lamp] He seems to allude to that kind of comet that is called Lampadias. (Mede.)

The third part of the rivers] i.e. Corrupted true doctrine, and perverted the Scriptures with his false glosses.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-8.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

The next judgment inflicted, or rather the farther progress of the former judgment, was the infecting of the waters and rivers with a mortal bitterness by a bitter star falling from heaven into them; denoting, some say, the fall of a great captain amongst the Jews in Judea; others understand it of heresy in general, of the Arian heresy in particular; and some apply it to the fall of Rome, the seat of the western empire; so Mr. Mede.

If it be understood of heresy, it shows us what a poisonous, bitter, and deadly nature, error and heresy is of. Error is as damnable as vice, the one is an open road, the other a by-path, to hell and destruction; and accordingly that person, and that people, which have a due care over their soul's salvation, will be as much afraid of erroneous principles as of debauched practices.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/revelation-8.html. 1700-1703.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Revelation 8:10. τρίτος, the third) The connection of events, times, and places, proves that the Arian and Vandal calamities are here pointed out. That Arius is the star, is the true judgment of Bullinger, Nigrinus, Viegas (although, following the opinion of Lyranus and Aureolus, he enters into a disputation also respecting Pelagius), also of Forbes, Cocceius, Gulichius, Sandhagen, N. Muler, Bierman, Amelius, Horchius, Vitringa, Reinbeck, Stock, Lœseken: and before all these, Seb. Meyer thought that Arius, together with other heretics, is here pointed out. The interpretation of Brightman concerning the Arian Emperors, Constantius and Valens, is weightily refuted by Marck. If these emperors are considered as a star on account of their princely majesty, I do not see on what grounds their fall can be referred to their departure from the faith, and not rather to the loss of their imperial glory. By which very argument also James Abbadie is refuted, who, in his work published not only in French but also in Belgic, interprets the star as referring to Count Boniface, by whose invitation the Vandals seized upon Africa. Independently of this, there was a great influx of Arianism into the state also: so that we cannot be surprised that this heresy has a place among the trumpets.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/revelation-8.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

There fell a great star from heaven: stars, in their metaphorical notion, signify some eminent persons in the state, or in the church; accordingly interpreters are divided in their senses; some thinking that it is meant of a political star, some eminent civil governor, and apply it to Caesar Augustulus, who, about the year 480, was forced to give over the empire, by Odoacer; of him Mr. Mede understands this prophecy. Others understand it of some ecclesiastical star, who apostatized, and apply it to Pelagius. I do rather incline to those who apply it to some ecclesiastical star; and Pelagius might be pointed at, as probably as any other in these times, for he was a great professor, and so burned

as a lamp. And it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters; and did corrupt a great part of the church.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-8.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

упалабольшая звезда Еще одно небесное тело (в этом случае, возможно, комета, потому что она оставляет огненный след) (см. пояснение к ст. 8; 6:13). Она распадется при приближении к земной поверхности и рассеется над земным шаром.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/revelation-8.html.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

A great star fell. The bishop of Meaux thinks this agrees very well to Cochebas, or Barcochebas, who in Adrian's time pretended to be the true Messias of the Jews; his name also signifying a star. He was the chief cause of those wars, and of the other destruction of the Jews. (Witham) --- The third trumpet points out to us the punishment that falls upon the Roman empire, in its destruction by the northern nations. These people spread themselves over the third part of the rivers and provinces of ancient Rome. The star is called wormwood, from the bitter calamities and miseries which they inflicted upon the Roman empire. (Pastorini)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/revelation-8.html. 1859.

Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books

-11 The previous trumpet brought trouble to the sea and this one brings it to fresh water. "Wormwood" describes bitter sorrow and misery. (Deuteronomy 29:18; Jeremiah 9:15; Jeremiah 23:15; Lamentations 3:19; Amos 5:7; Amos 6:12)

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Hampton, Gary. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "Gary Hampton Commentary on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghc/revelation-8.html. 2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

lamp. Greek. lampas. Elsewhere Revelation 4:5. Matthew 25:1-8. John 18:3 (torch). Acts 20:8 (light).

waters. The texts read "the waters".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-8.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the third angel sounded, and there fell a great star from heaven, burning as it were a lamp, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters;

A lamp - a torch.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-8.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) And the third angel . . .—Translate, And the third angel sounded, and there fell out of the heaven a great star burning (or, kindled—the light is not inherent, but borrowed) as a torch (or, lamp—same word as in Revelation 4:5), and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the springs of the waters. The flaming star seems to symbolise the fall of a potentate; the trumpet-blast proclaims that the mighty who have been, as luminaries, admired, and perhaps worshipped, will fall. The advancing progress of Christianity is to be marked by many such a fall. The rulers of earth, burning with lust of conquest or with pride of fanaticism, will be plucked from their seat among the stars (Obadiah 1:4); but their fall is accompanied, as in the last instance, with miseries. The fountains and rivers are smitten, the sources of health and joy, the streams of prosperity, are injured.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-8.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the third angel sounded, and there fell a great star from heaven, burning as it were a lamp, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters;
a great
1:20; 6:13; 9:1; 12:4; Isaiah 14:12; Luke 10:18; Jude 1:13
the fountains
16:4; Exodus 7:20,21; Judges 15:11; 2 Kings 2:19-22; 2 Chronicles 32:3; Isaiah 12:3; Hosea 13:15,16
Reciprocal: Hosea 10:4 - thus;  Revelation 2:1 - holdeth;  Revelation 8:7 - the third;  Revelation 8:9 - the third part of the creatures

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-8.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

No change in the general drama takes place, but some special incident is predit-ted to affect the people unfavorably. A slur in symbolical language denotes some leader, and he is here likened to a meteor that. falls to the earth. selecting as its landing place the rivers and fountains of water. That is attacking a vital portion of a country because of the necessity of water.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-8.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 8:10

Revelation 8:10 And the third angel sounded, and there fell a great star from heaven, burning as it were a lamp, and it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters;

By this

third angel,

we may understand the ministers of the next century, namely, Augustinus, Hieronymus, Prosperus, Optatus, etc. The great star that fell from heaven was Nestorius, the then Bishop of Consiantinople, and several ministers with him, who corrupted the doctrine of the gospel, touching original sin, justification, election, satisfaction for sin and free-will, and polluted the pure worship of God, by bringing in penance's, holy days, fasts, and feasts of their own inventions; Also superstitions, the worshipping of angels, praying to saints deceased, etc. These heterodox prelates and priest, are said to fall from heaven; that is from the true church, sound doctrine, pure worship, and heavenly life. And of shining stars to become burning lamps; that Isaiah, they lost all that spiritual light which they had by the gifts of the Spirit, {as 1 Corinthians 12:4; 1 Corinthians 12:8} but being learned men, they kept the lamp-light of their acquired arts. Which they had from the school-men; and thereby they flamed and shined like a burning lamp; (as the lamps of the five foolish virgins did, until they went out). { Matthew 25:1-2; Matthew 25:8-11}

And it fell upon the third part of the rivers, and upon the fountains of waters.

Whereby we may understand the rivers of the sanctuary. { Ezekiel 47:1; Ezekiel 47:5; Ezekiel 47:12} The sound doctrine of the gospel, and the pure worship of God. There is a river, the streams whereof make glad the city (the church) of God, { Psalm 46:4} called the Wells of Salvation, { Isaiah 12:3} and the Fountains of Living Waters. { Revelation 7:17} The third part; that Isaiah, not all, but a great part of doctrine and worship was corrupted and polluted.

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-8.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

THIRD TRUMPET—The wormwood waters, Revelation 8:10-11.

10.Fell a great star—As the star fall of Revelation 9:1, is based on the first fall of Satan, so this fall may be based on the apostasy of Adam and his race. Burning’ lamp, or rather torch, is emblem, as in previous trumpets, of divine wrath.

Rivers’ fountains—The sources of draughts to quench thirst.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-8.html. 1874-1909.

The Bible Study New Testament

10. A large star, burning like a torch. It drops from the sky to show that it is God’s act. It may be the Devil who inflicts these things, but God allows it and God sends it against those who persecute his people (the messianic community). Now the land waters (lakes, rivers, etc.) are used as a tool of vengeance. The star’s name is Bitterness – symbolic of the bitter sorrow which these disasters bring to wicked people. [Perhaps such things as pollution and shortages, including all sorts of problems, can be thought of as part of this third Trumpet.]

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Revelation 8:10". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/revelation-8.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.