Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 8:4

And the smoke of the incense, with the prayers of the saints, went up before God out of the angel's hand.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Angel (a Spirit);   Incense;   Intercession;   Meteorology and Celestial Phenomena;   Prayer;   The Topic Concordance - Seals;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Incense;  
Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies;   Tabernacle;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Intercession of Christ;   Order;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Altar;   Incense;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Altar;   Atonement, Day of;   Bird;   Censer;   Frankincense;   Incense;   Prayer;   Sacrifice;   Zacharias;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Censer;   Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Beast;   Plagues of Egypt;   Prayer;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Angels;   Bowl;   Enoch Book of;   Incense;   Incense ;   Smoke ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - The Brazen Altar;   20 To Ask, Request;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cherubim;   Priest;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Incense;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Roman Catholics;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ascend;   Revelation of John:;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for January 2;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The smoke of the incense - with the prayers - Though incense itself be an emblem of the prayers of the saints, Psalm 141:2; yet here they are said to ascend before God, as well as the incense. It is not said that the angel presents these prayers. He presents the incense, and the prayers ascend With it. The ascending of the incense shows that the prayers and offering were accepted.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-8.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And the smoke of the incense … - The smoke caused by the burning incense. John, as he saw this, naturally interpreted it of the prayers of the saints. The meaning of the whole symbol, thus explained, is that, at the time referred to, the anxiety of the church in regard to the events which were about to occur would naturally lead to much prayer. It is not necessary to attempt to verify this by any distinct historical facts, for no one can doubt that, in a time of such impending calamities, the church would be earnestly engaged in devotion. Such has always been the case in times of danger; and it may always be assumed to be true, that when danger threatens, whether it be to the church at large or to an individual Christian, there will be a resort to the throne of grace.

sa40

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-8.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And the smoke of the incense, with the prayers of the saints, went up before God out of the angel's hand.

Smoke of the incense ... prayers ... went up before God ... The prayers were heard, and God's response was at once evident in the sending of judgments upon the earth, symbolized by the casting of fire upon it by the angel with the censer. "The judgments of the wicked, which follow in the trumpet visions constitute the answer to the saints' prayers."[34]

ENDNOTE:

[34] A. Plummer, op. cit., p. 232.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-8.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the smoke of the incense,.... For the incense being put, as it was used to be, upon burning coals of fire, caused a smoke to arise like a cloud, Leviticus 16:13; so that the whole house, or temple, was filled with itF4Misn. Yoma, c. 5. sect. 1. :

which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended before God out of the angel's hand; alluding to the incense the priest took in his hand, and cast upon the burning coals; and shows how that by the smoke of the incense, or the virtue of Christ's mediation, the imperfections of the prayers of the saints are covered; and how they are it perfumed and made acceptable to God; and so are said to ascend up before him, and to be regarded by him, as the prayers of Cornelius were, Acts 10:4; now all this is expressive of the wonderful affection of Christ for his church and people, and care of them; that before the angels sound their trumpets, and bring on wars and desolations into the empire, Christ is represented as interceding for them, and presenting their prayers both for deliverance for themselves, and vengeance on their enemies.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-8.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And the smoke of the incense, [which came] with the prayers of the saints, b ascended up before God out of the angel's hand.

(b) Our prayers are worth nothing, unless the true and sweet savour of that only sacrifice be especially and before all things with them, that is to say, unless we are first of all justified through faith in his Son, acceptable to him.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-8.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

which came with the prayers  …  ascended up — rather, “the smoke of the incense FOR (or ‹given TO‘: ‹given‘ being understood from Revelation 8:3) the prayers of the saints ascended up, out of the angel‘s hand, in the presence of Gods” The angel merely burns the incense given him by Christ the High Priest, so that its smoke blends with the ascending prayers of the saints. The saints themselves are priests; and the angels in this priestly ministration are but their fellow servants (Revelation 19:10).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-8.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

The smoke (ο καπνοςho kapnos). Old word, in N.T. only Acts 2:19; Revelation 8:4; Revelation 9:2., Revelation 9:17.; Revelation 14:11; Revelation 15:8; Revelation 18:9, Revelation 18:18; Revelation 19:3. Here from the incense in the angel‘s hand.

With the prayers (ταις προσευχαιςtais proseuchais). So associative-instrumental case, but it may be dative as in Revelation 8:3 (for).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-8.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Which came with the prayers

An awkward rendering, followed by Rev., though with the omission of the italicized which came. The construction is ἀνέβη wentup, with the dative case, to the prayers. “The ascending smoke had reference to the prayers, was designed to accompany them and render them more acceptable” (Winer).

Of the saints ( τῶν ἁγίων )

See on Acts 26:10.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-8.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the angel's hand.

And the smoke of the incense came up before God, with the prayers of the saints — A token that both were accepted.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-8.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

angel's

(See Scofield "Hebrews 1:4").

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Revelation 8:4". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/revelation-8.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE PRAYERS OF THE SAINTS

‘The prayers of the saints.’

Revelation 8:4

The language of the opening verses of this chapter is beautifully figurative of the work of our great Intercessor, the Lord Jesus Christ, Who offers or presents the prayers of the saints before the throne of God. Prayer to be acceptable to God must be offered ‘through Jesus Christ our Lord.’ What does this general ending to our prayers mean to us?

I. It is a confession of our unworthiness and sinfulness in all our words and thoughts. We claim audience only through another.

II. We recognise the great fact that there is no access to God but by Him Who isthe Way.’—He was the Bearer of sin first, that He might be the Bearer of prayer always.

III. The access made, Christ took His place at God’s right hand, as High Priest of His people.

IV. In doing this, Christ makes our prayers what they were not in themselves: fit to enter into the ears of the Lord of Sabaoth. But for that, the very best prayer that ever went out of the heart of man would defile heaven; but now God perceives the incense: and just as He sees, not the sinner, but the righteousness of Christ, in which that sinner stands, so He sees, not so much the prayer as the incense which mingles with that prayer; and He is well pleased with the supplication for the incense’ sake.

V. What we do in the name of Another is the same as if that Other did it. Pray in Christ’s name, the prayer is as if Christ prayed it.

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/revelation-8.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

4 And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the angel’s hand.

Ver. 4. The smoke of the incense] The saints’ prayers perfumed with Christ’s odours ascended, that is, were highly accepted in heaven, Acts 10:4; Exodus 3:9, as well appeared by the answer they had here in the next verse. The Church is said to ascend out of the wilderness of this world with pillars of smoke, Song of Solomon 3:6. Elationibus fumi, with raised affections, and with strong supplications, wherein how many sweet spices are burned together by the fire of faith, as humility, love, &c. All which would stink worse in God’s nostrils than the onions and garlic of Egypt, did not Christ perfume and present them.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-8.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Revelation 8:4

Christ the Bearer of Prayer and Praise.

I. It was a thought very dear to our Master, especially just before He left this earth, to tell His people that they should pray in His name. Five times the direction recurs in those four chapters of St. John which enshrine such legacies of love. In glad obedience, then, to this kind mandate, our Church has been very careful to wind up all its prayers and praises,—for they are one; praise is prayer jubilant, and prayer, as St. Paul teaches us, stripped of thanksgiving, is no prayer at all,—all its prayers and praises with some form of words to express that name of Jesus, equivalent to "through Jesus Christ our Lord." And that final form of doxology and supplication is, indeed, the committal of the petition or the song to the Lord Jesus Christ, that He may be its Bearer to the throne of God. It is sending it up to mingle with the incense. Accordingly, out of all the prayers and collects which are in the Prayer-book, there are only nine which do not end through the name and intercession of Christ. And for those nine there are special reasons. Four are prayers addressed to the Second Person of the Trinity Himself, and therefore of course do not close with the usual termination. These are the prayer of St. Chrysostom, the collect for the third Sunday in Advent, the collect for the first Sunday in Lent, the collect for Trinity Sunday, in part, at least, the prayer before the consecration in the office for the Holy Communion, and the form of consecration of the elements, because that, not ending in prayer, has not the name of the Lord Jesus Christ at the close. The absence of the name of Christ in the collect for Trinity Sunday is to be accounted for by the same principle: that Christ is addressed in the collect. In three others,—the collect for the sixth Sunday after the Epiphany, the first of the three collects for Good Friday, and the collect for Ascension,—the whole prayer is so full in its tissue of the person, and the work, and the glory of Christ, that it is really tantamount to an address both directed to Christ, and presented through Christ. And in the only remaining instance of which I am aware,—the prayer pronounced by the bishop before confirming,—it partakes so much of the nature of a blessing that it is to be regarded rather as a benediction than as a supplication.

II. But it may have occurred to some to ask, Why do we not conclude the Lord's Prayer with the name of Christ? Does not the absence of His name mar its evangelical character? And if it be said, It was given before Christ's death and ascension, and therefore it would have been premature if our Lord had taught us to put His name at the end of it, then the suggestion would arise, Ought not the Church to add it? But I believe the right answer to the question is this: First, being a prayer given us by our Lord Himself, it necessarily so associates itself throughout with Him, and makes Him so present to the mind, that if His name be not there, His image is, and we cannot choose but pray it through Christ; and, secondly, as they are our Lord's own words, and therefore not human, they do not need the closing words, "through Christ," for many of the reasons for which other invocations need them, for they ascend to heaven in their own right, by their Divine original.

III. But now let us look more closely what it means when we say, at the end of our prayers, "through Jesus Christ." (1) First, it is a confession of our unworthiness and sinfulness in all our words and thoughts. We claim audience only through another. (2) Secondly, we recognise the great fact that there is no access to God but by Him who is "the Way." There was a barrier, a range of untraversable heights, masses upon masses of sin, between us and God. Christ came and bore away that mountain, and the road was open; He was the Bearer of sin first, that He might be the Bearer of prayer always. (3) But, thirdly, this was not all. The access made, Christ took His place at God's right hand, as High-priest of His people, to receive and present their sacrifices of prayer and praise. The Israelite brought the lamb, but Aaron offered it. So we lay down our heart's best feelings at Jesus's feet, and then Jesus gives them to the Father. (4) And, fourthly, in doing this, Christ makes our prayers what they were not in themselves: fit to enter into the ears of the Lord of Sabaoth. But for that, the very best prayer that ever went out of the heart of man would defile heaven; but now God perceives the incense: and just as He sees, not the sinner, but the righteousness of Christ, in which that sinner stands, so He sees, not so much the prayer as the incense which mingles with that prayer; and He is well pleased with the supplication for the incense' sake. Cain's sacrifice, without the lamb, did not go up; Abel's, with it, did. (5) But, fifthly, what we do in the name of another, it is the same as if that other did it. Pray in Christ's name, the prayer is as if Christ prayed it. As Christ represents me in heaven, so, in a sense, I am representing Christ upon earth. And this is the explanation of the greatness of the undertaking which God makes, that whatever we ask in the name of Jesus Christ we shall receive. For, in the name of Christ, I can only ask what I am sure Christ would have asked if He were here. And what am I sure that Christ would have asked if He were here? Only either what He did ask when He was upon earth, or what He has told me that it is in God's mind to give. Therefore when I pray I can only put the name of Christ to a promised or to an unpromised thing subject to the will and glory of God.

IV. Note three most happy results of thus making Jesus the Bearer of your prayers. (1) First, He separates and refines those prayers which are put into His hands to offer. You have been asking, perhaps, some thing which would not be good for you to have. Christ does not present that. You give Him your mixed nosegay; He takes out the weeds, and offers only the flowers. (2) Secondly, He will add something to the prayers you give Him. "The wounded side of Christ," George Herbert says, "is the believer's post-bag"; and thus he ends his sweet poem, with these words out of the mouth of Christ:—

"Or if hereafter any of my friends

Will give me of this kind, the door

Shall still be open; what he sends

I will present, and somewhat more,

Not to his hurt. Sighs will convey

Anything to me. Hark, despair! away!"

(3) And, thirdly, what you have once really entrusted to Christ, you need be careful about no more. Some persons are anxious about their prayers when they have said them, how they will speed. There is no need; you may leave all with Christ; it is all now a part of His undertaking.

J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 6th series, p. 29.


References: Revelation 9:6.—Homilist, 1st series, vol. vi., p. 345. Revelation 10:4.—Homiletic Magazine, vol. viii., p. 11. Revelation 10:5, Revelation 10:6.—H. W. Beecher, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xi., p. 77. Revelation 10:11.—Homiletic Quarterly, vol. iii., p. 106.



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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/revelation-8.html.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

This only denotes the acceptableness of Christ’s intercession, and God’s people’s prayers, through the virtue of that intercession, unto God.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-8.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Ascended up before God; in token of the acceptance of their prayers. The prayers of saints being presented by the great interceding Angel, and perfumed with his merits, ascend with acceptance before God, and will be answered in rich and lasting blessings on his friends, and in the ruin of his foes.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-8.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation

"The smoke of the incense which came up with prayers of the saints ascended up before God, out of the angel's hand"--8:4.

The smoke ascended in acknowledgment of the prayers being heard, recognized and received at the throne. The incense ascended to God out of the angel's hand, which was the sign that the answer to the prayers of all the saints, joined with the cry of the souls under the altar, would be forthcoming.

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Wallace, Foy E. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Foy E. Wallace's Commentary on the Book of Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/foy/revelation-8.html. 1966.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The angel offered this incense on the coals on the golden incense altar. The smoke of the incense went up before God symbolizing His receiving the prayers of His people. [Note: Swete, p108.] Clearly the incense, while symbolizing prayer ( Revelation 5:8), is distinct from prayer here. However the total impression is of prayers commingling as the angel pours more incense on the altar. He facilitates these prayers, though Jesus Christ, of course, is the only mediator between God and man (cf. 1 Timothy 2:5).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-8.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 8:4. The smoke of the incense, now added to the prayers of the Church, went up before God, reminding the Almighty of the sufferings of His people, and of the answer for which they cried.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-8.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

smoke. Greek. kapnos. Occurs thirteen times, all in Rev., except Acts 2:19. Except here, always associated with "judgment" or the "pit".

out of. App-104.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-8.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the angel's hand.

The smoke ... which came with the prayers ... ascended up - rather, 'the smoke of the incense FOR (or given TO: understood from Revelation 8:3) the prayers of the saints ascended up, out of the angel's hand, in the presence of God.' The angel merely burns the incense given him by Christ the High Priest, so that its smoke blends with the saints' ascending prayers. The saints themselves are priests; the angels in this priestly ministration are but their fellow-servants (Revelation 19:10).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-8.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(4) And the smoke of . . .—Better, And there went up the smoke of the incense for (or to, i.e., designed for, and to give fragrance to) the prayers of the saints, out of the hand of the angel, before God. The emblem of the rising column of smoke, in which incense and prayer now mingled, is the token that the prayers of the saints, now rendered acceptable, and no longer premature, are about to be answered. These prayers of God’s people, weak and imperfect as they are, are yet invincible weapons in the hands of Christ’s soldiers, and will be found mightier than any carnal weapons. As Jericho fell without Israel needing to strike a blow, so now the Israel of God will be seen to be omnipotent through true and faithful prayer. The charter of the Church’s power is in the words of Christ: “If ye abide in Me, and My words abide in you, ye shall ask what ye will, and it shall be done unto you” (John 15:7). The judgments that follow are not indeed specifically prayed for by the Church of Christ, but they are the results of their prayers, and prove the might of all prayer.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-8.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the angel's hand.
3; 15:8; Exodus 30:1; Psalms 141:2; Luke 1:10
Reciprocal: Exodus 37:25 - GeneralExodus 37:29 - incense;  Leviticus 16:12 - sweet incense;  Leviticus 16:13 - And he;  Leviticus 24:7 - pure;  2 Chronicles 13:11 - sweet incense;  Psalm 96:8 - bring;  Song of Solomon 1:12 - my;  Malachi 1:11 - incense;  Luke 1:11 - the altar;  Acts 10:31 - are;  Hebrews 7:25 - to make;  Revelation 5:8 - the prayers

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-8.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

The odor of incense was pleasing to God in the days when such services were required ( Exodus 30:7-9; Leviticus 16:12-13). and likewise the prayers of faithful servants in the Christian Dispensation are acceptable ( 1 Peter 3:12).

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-8.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 8:4

Revelation 8:4 And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the angel's hand.

Christ our mediator standing at the golden altar with his golden censer in his hand, received much incense to offer up (with the prayers of the saints) upon the golden altar.

The smoke of the incense, with the prayers of the saints, ascend up before God, out of the angels hand.

That Isaiah, the prayers, intercessions, thanksgiving, and supplications of the saints, had access to God, through Jesus Christ, { Ephesians 2:18} with acceptance, { 1 Peter 2:5} for Christ's sake, in whom God is well pleased; and the prayers of the saints also heard, their persons and services are accepted in Jesus Christ his beloved son.

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-8.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 8:4. And the smoke of the incense went up to the prayers of the saints from the hand of the angel before God. To the prayers, importing these, which were presented in and with the frankincense.[Note: The ταῖ ς προσευχαῖ ς are Dinted to the θυμιαμά των, exactly as לנפשתיכם, in Genesis 9:5, to דמכם, your blood to your souls, importing or being us good as these—your blood, that is, your souls.]

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-8.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

4.Came—Greek, “And the smoke of the incense went up to the prayers of the saints, out of the hand of the angel.” The incense went up to the ascending prayers to perfume and reinforce them.

Before God—The ascending incense was in the theophanic presence.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-8.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 8:4. As an agent of God, the angel is commissioned to ratify with Divine approval the petitions of the saints for the end; this involves retribution on the impenitent and hostile world. The prophet is sure such aspirations are in harmony with God’s will.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 8:4". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-8.html. 1897-1910.