Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Revelation 8:6

And the seven angels who had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound them.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Angel (a Spirit);   Meteorology and Celestial Phenomena;   The Topic Concordance - Seals;  
Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Order;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Revelation, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Beast;   Plagues of Egypt;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Angels;   Blood;   Trump Trumpet ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Cherubim;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Prepared themselves to sound - Each took up his trumpet, and stood prepared to blow his blast. Wars are here indicated; the trumpet was the emblem of war.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/revelation-8.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound - Revelation 8:7. Evidently in succession, perhaps by arranging themselves in the order in which they were to sound. The way is now prepared for the sounding of the trumpets, and for the fearful commotions and changes which would be indicated by that. The last seal is opened; heaven stands in suspense to know what is to be disclosed; the saints, filled with solicitude, have offered their prayers; the censer of coals has been cast to the earth, as if these judgments could be no longer stayed by prayer; and the angels prepare to sound the trumpets indicative of what is to occur.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/revelation-8.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And the seven angels that had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound.

This verse begins the trumpet judgments, and it should be noted that all of them are tempered with mercy, only "the third part" of affected things being involved. "The mercy is greater than the judgment."[39] This is another particular in which the trumpet judgments parallel that of the seals, in which only "the fourth" part was hurt or destroyed. A big difference is that the seal judgments were ordinary events; these are supernatural and represent the direct intervention of God in the progress of the natural order of creation. There is clearly here an echo of the primeval curse upon Adam and his posterity in Genesis 3:17-19, when God intervened to reduce the desirability of the natural environment "for Adam's sake"; and these judgments show that God is still doing the same thing, and, presumably, for precisely the same reason, "for Adam's sake." It was for the spiritual advantage of man that the curse came upon the ground for Adam's sake, and it must be that the continuing adjustment of human environment by the Father is also for the purpose of making it a little easier for people to set their minds upon the things eternal "The first four of these involve natural catastrophes; the last three fall directly upon men."[40] This motif of four and three appears repeatedly in this prophecy. "This fresh series of disasters does not advance matters any further than the previous seal-series."[41] All of the things in both series concern the life of people in the present dispensation. Referring the judgments to the so-called "Great Tribulation" is a mistake. "The tribulation began with the Cross and resurrection and continues until the end of time."[42]

The judgments in this and the following chapter do not need to be identified with any particular time or event. Their fulfillment is multiple and continuous throughout history. As Pieters said:

I know them. Have we not ourselves twice, in 1914-1918, and again in 1939-1945, seen the bottomless pit opened, and the heavens darkened by the swarms of evil things that issued from it? Has not the thunder of two hundred million hellish horsemen shaken the earth in our day?[43]

The same thing, of course, may be said of countless natural disasters occurring almost every week everywhere on earth. These verses enable people to connect all such disasters with the will of God; and yet God's purpose is benign. The Lord cursed the ground for Adam's sake; and the great floods, earthquakes, droughts, volcanoes, etc., all these visitations, are for the same purpose, that evil men may learn repentance and be saved. All such things are depicted, not literally, but symbolically in the trumpet series.

[39] J. R. Dummelow, op. cit., p. 1080.

[40] George Eldon Ladd, op. cit.. p. 126.

[41] James Moffatt, Expositor's Greek New Testament, Vol. V (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1967), p. 403.

[42] Douglas Ezell, op. cit., p. 47.

[43] Albertus Pieters, Studies in the Revelation of St. John (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1934), p. 130.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/revelation-8.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets,.... Given them, Revelation 8:2;

prepared themselves to sound; they stood up, took their trumpets in their hands, and put them to their mouths; this was giving notice of what was coming upon the earth, and a kind of warning to men, and a call upon them to repentance, and to prepare to meet God in the way of his judgments. The time when these trumpets began to blow was after the opening of the seventh seal, and so after the destruction of the empire as Pagan, which was under the sixth seal; and after that peace and rest from persecution in Constantine's time, signified by the half hour's silence in heaven; and after the prayers of the saints for vengeance, because of their blood shed in the time of Rome Pagan, were offered up, heard, taken notice of, and accepted; and therefore cannot regard, nor have any concern with the state of the church before Constantine's time, as some have thought the three first trumpets had; the first introducing the contradictions and blasphemies of the Jews, and their persecutions of the Christians, and the effusion of their blood by them; the second the ten persecutions under the Heathen emperors; and the third, the errors and heresies which pestered the churches of those times: nor indeed do they concern the state of the church at all; though it seems much more likely that the first four trumpets should bring in; as others have thought, the several heresies of Arius, Macedonius, Pelagius, and Eutyches, which sprung up before the rise of Mahomet, who appears under the fifth trumpet. But all the six trumpets have to do with the empire as Christian; for as the six seals are so many steps towards the destruction of the empire as Pagan, and the vials bring on the ruin of Rome Papal; so the six trumpets are so many gradual advances to the ruin of the empire, now Christian: and it must be observed, that the Emperor Theodosius, at his death, left the empire divided between his two sons, Arcadius and Honorius, the eastern part of it, which had Constantinople for its seat, to the former, and the western part of it, which had Rome for its seat, to the latter; now the first four trumpets bring in a barbarous people out of the north, the Goths, Huns, and Vandals, into the western part, who, by various incursions and wars, at last utterly destroy it; and the fifth and sixth trumpets bring in the Saracens under Mahomet, and the Turks into the eastern part, who took possession of that, and have kept it unto this day. (This was published in 1747, Ed.) A preparation being made, the angels begin to sound their trumpets.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/revelation-8.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

4 And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound.

(4) This is the work of the administers. The angels, the administers of Christ, by sounding trumpet and voice (for they are heralds) effectually call forth the instruments of the wrath of God, through his power. Until now, things have been general. Now the narration of specific things follows, which the angels fix in number wrought in their order, set out in (Revelation 8:7) and is concluded with the declaration of the event which followed these things done in the world, and in chapters ten and eleven.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/revelation-8.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

sound — blow the trumpets.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/revelation-8.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets. See Revelation 8:2. There is the utmost deliberation. All must be made ready. The four angels hold back the winds (Revelation 7:1), then there was the silence of half an hour (Revelation 8:1); now the seven angels prepared themselves to sound. This implies that all things were being made ready for the great events to follow. {Trumpets}. The trumpet is used to give a signal. Usually it implied the march or charge of armies. See Joel 2:1, Joel 2:15; Jeremiah 4:5; Ezekiel 33:1-6. Sometimes it calls the people to worship. See Numbers 31:6; 1 Chronicles 15:24. The reader will see that the first is likely to be the significance here.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/revelation-8.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Prepared themselves (ητοιμασαν αυτουςhētoimasan hautous). First aorist active indicative of ετοιμαζωhetoimazō They knew the signal and got ready.

To sound (ινα σαλπισωσινhina salpisōsin). Sub-final (object) clause with ιναhina and the first aorist ingressive active subjunctive of σαλπιζωsalpizō The infinitive could have been used.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/revelation-8.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

To sound ( ἵνα σαλπίσωσιν )

Lit., that they should blow the trumpets. Raised their trumpets to their mouths in act to blow.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/revelation-8.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound.

And the seven angels prepared themselves to sound — That each, when it should come to his turn, might sound without delay. But while they do sound, they still stand before God.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/revelation-8.html. 1765.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

6.] And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves that they might blow (raised their trumpets to their mouths, and stood in attitude to blow them).

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/revelation-8.html. 1863-1878.

Scofield's Reference Notes

angels

(See Scofield "Hebrews 1:4").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Revelation 8:6". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/revelation-8.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

6 And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound.

Ver. 6. Prepared themselves] Having got sign, as it were, by that which Christ did in the former verse, they set to in order to sound their trumpets.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/revelation-8.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Revelation 8:6. And the seven angels—prepared themselves to sound. As the seals foretold the state and condition of the Roman empire before, and till it became Christian, so the trumpets foreshow the state and condition of it afterward. The sound of the trumpet, as Jeremiah observes, ch. Jeremiah 4:19 and as every one understands it, is the alarm of war; and the sounding of these trumpets is designed to rouse and excite the nations against the Roman empire; called the third part of the world, as perhaps including the third part of the world, and being seated principally in Europe, the third part of the world as believed at that time. We may just observe, that the censers here mentioned, were the same with the vials full of odours mentioned ch. Revelation 5:8. The offeringof incense on the golden altar, seems to determine this allusion to the constant offering of incense in the temples and not to the service peculiar to the high-priest on the day of expiation; and fully shews the propriety of this vision in not expressly representing the high-priest. Indeed many interpreters, and that with good reason, understand the angel, Revelation 8:3 as an emblem of Christ, the great High-Priest of his church. As the golden altar made a part of the scene, there was a propriety in its appearing to be used; and the time of praying was the hour of incense. This vision may probably be designed to intimate, that, considering the scenes of confusion represented by the trumpets, the saints should be exceedingly earnest with God to pour out a spirit of wisdom, piety, and zeal upon the church, and preserve it safe amid these confusions.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/revelation-8.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Note here, 1. The readiness of the holy angels in heaven to execute the will and pleasure of God here on earth; they knew that the execution of God's judgments was to be performed by them, and accordingly they prepare themselves for it.

Note, 2. The judgments denounced by the first angel, Fire and hail mingled with blood. A strange storm, alluding probably to one of the plagues of Egypt, mentioned Exodus 9 denoting, some say, direful temporal judgments which God would bring upon Judea in general, and Galilee in particular, by bloodshed and insurrections. The trees, says Dr. More, signify the great men, and the grass the common people. Others by this storm of hail and blood understand a spiritual judgment, namely, an inundation of heresy upon the Christian church, which is of a fiery and bloody nature; wherever it prevails, it is a dreadful plague, and a consuming storm; justly inflicted by God upon a people for their contempt of the gospel, and not receiving the truth in the love of it, that they might be saved.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/revelation-8.html. 1700-1703.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 8:6. The half-hour silence in heaven is now at an end; after the fire, whose meaning also becomes manifest by the threatening signs immediately following (Revelation 8:5), has been cast upon the earth, the seven angels (Revelation 8:2) prepare to sound their trumpets.

ἡτοίμασαν ἐαυτ. This includes the grasping of the trumpets in such a way that they could bring them to their mouths.(2457)

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/revelation-8.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The angels are God’s ministers, by which he bringeth his counsels to pass in the world: they hearing the thunderings and voices, knew the time was come when they were to begin the execution of God’s judgments upon the earth; the execution of which was intrusted to them, and they are therefore set out (though they be always ready) after the manner of men, preparing themselves to execute what God had intrusted them with the execution of.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/revelation-8.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The seven trumpets; in accordance with the view that has been given above, the four trumpets of the present chapter are commonly understood as emblematic of the successive invasions by which the destruction of the western empire was completed; while the two woe-trumpets that follow in the next chapter relate to the overthrow of the eastern empire by the Saracens and Turks.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/revelation-8.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound.

It will neither be improper nor unprofitable I hope, under the Lord's teaching, if, before we enter upon the several dispensations which seem to be pointed out, under the several trumpets, we do by these as we did by the seals; first, take a general view of them, before we enter into the particulars of them. We find, that as on opening of the fifth seal, cries went up from under the Altar, from the souls of those, whose blood had been shed by persecution; see Revelation 6:9-10. So here, before sounding of the first trumpet, Jesus takes up their cause, and now begins to answer their prayers in the judgments, which, with the sounding of the first trumpet, begins to be poured upon the earth.

Concerning the dispensation of the trumpets, there can be no question, but that their very sound is an alarm. Hence, the Angel thrice proclaims, woe to the inhabitants of the earth, after four of the trumpets had been sounded, by reason of the greater sorrow that was to follow in the earth, under the sounding of the other three. And, indeed, it is evident that the ministry of the seals, which referred to the time when the Empire was heathen, had nothing so awful in it, as the ministry of the trumpets. Opposition from heathenism and idolatry, however in appearance it may seem more directly injurious to the truth than any other, is not in fact so much as what comes from false views of the truth, and the opposition made from those quarters. The man that confessed Christ, but in that confession denies his Godhead, is a greater enemy in reality to Christ, than he that denies his being, and his religion altogether. I have found more bitter hatred from Pharisees, than from all the ungodly, and careless, put them altogether. And very sure I am, that all the open enemies to the truth of the Gospel, in those who deny all revelation, are not to be dreaded for persecution, as much as those are, who on the one hand, reduce the Christian doctrine to a mere system of morality, and while professing themselves to be Christians, deny Christ's Godhead; or on the other, those who though acknowledging his Godhead, and in part his atonement, yet make Christ only a procuring cause, and insist upon man's own attainments and improvements, as being a part Saviour.

The trumpet dispensation, through the whole of that department, intimated a season of greater persecution to the true Church of Christ, though the empire became Christian under the countenance of the Emperors, than while it remained under the darkness of idolatry. Hence the trumpets, from the sounding of the first to the last are gradually opening the steps, by which the persecutions came forward to the overthrow of the empire. God had appointed in the depths of the wisdom of his providence, that those two powers, the Mahometan imposture in the East, called the false prophet; and the folly and iniquity of Popery in the West, called the Beast; should both come forward much about the same time, and afflict the people of God. Hence, about this period it was, that upon the opening of the seventh seal, we find the spreading of Mahomet's imposture covering the East. Arabia, Egypt, and Assyria, soon were detached from the empire of Rome; and the Impostor Mahomet set up his standard in all that vast empire. On the other hand, in the Western world, the trumpery of Popery became soon established; and the great enemy of souls, turning Christian, and taking advantage from the errors of Arian heresy, soon proselyted the multitudes to the doctrine, which complimented man's goodness, at the expense of God's truth; and both these soon divided the eastern from the western world, and which, more or less, (for their iniquity is not full,) have continued to the present hour, and must continue, according to this blessed book of prophecy, until the time here predicted, for the accomplishment of both is fulfilled. So much I thought it necessary to observe, on the ministry of the trumpets, in general. We will now go on, under the Lord's permission, and under an humble hope of the, Lord's teaching, to the consideration of the sounding of each trumpet; beginning with the first, and following them regularly one after another, according to the order in which they are placed.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/revelation-8.html. 1828.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And the seven angels who had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound.’

It is possible that the silence in Heaven has been utilised for the purpose of putting into action the prayers of God’s people. All Heaven has waited in awed silence while this task has been performed. The Lord in His holy Temple has been receiving their prayers and Heaven (Revelation 8:1) and earth (Revelation 7:1) have waited in silence before Him (compare Habakkuk 2:20 - ‘the Lord is in His holy Temple, let all the earth keep silence before Him’). Now the four angels at the four corners of the earth who will hurt the earth and the sea and the trees will be loosed (Revelation 7:1).

While the six seals were only indirectly the judgments of God in that they involved the activities of men, these are the more direct judgments which go alongside them, more intensified and more devastating, and yet more restricted in effect. When were they released? In the days of John and onwards.

The ideas behind the consequences of the seven trumpets are based to some extent on the plagues of Exodus 7. Hail and fire mixed with blood compares with the seventh plague (Exodus 9:22 following), the sea becoming blood compares with the first plague, as does the undrinkable water (Exodus 7:17 following), and the darkness which follows the fourth trumpet blast compares with the ninth plague (Exodus 10:21 following), while the locusts parallel Exodus 10:4. Just as God was then preparing for a great deliverance of His people, and to lead them into the land of promise, so now God is seen as preparing a new and greater deliverance for His people and is leading them into the heavenly Promised Land.

It is very probable that we should see the first four trumpets as resulting from the release of the ‘winds’ by the four angels of Revelation 7:1. These winds are to be released to carry out their work on earth with devastating consequences. Each releases something which affects a part of mankind. Every occurrence of such events can be seen as the continual working of these ‘winds’ of God.

The First Trumpet Sounds.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/revelation-8.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The whole scene quite clearly symbolizes God sending judgment on the earth in response to His people"s accumulated prayers (cf. Exodus 3:7-10; Exodus 19:16-19; Revelation 4:5; Revelation 11:19; Revelation 16:18). The trumpet judgments to follow are what He will send. The storm theophany, therefore, apparently implies the awful calamities that will come in the trumpet and bowl judgments that are ahead. [Note: Robert L. Thomas, Revelation 8-22 : An Exegetical Commentary, p12.]

All the trumpet judgments seem to proceed out of the seventh seal judgment. [Note: For proof that the trumpet judgments telescope out from the seventh seal rather than recapitulating the seals judgments, see ibid, pp3-5, 525-43.] In other words, when the Lamb broke the seventh seal John saw not just one judgment but a whole new series of judgments. There is every reason to conclude that these will follow chronologically. [Note: See Tenney, p71; and Ladd, p122.] We shall see that seven bowl judgments apparently proceed out of the seventh trumpet judgment in the same way. [Note: See the chart "The Tribulation Judgments" at the beginning of my discussion of chapter6 for a visual representation of this relationship.] Some interpreters, however, believe the trumpet judgments merely recap and restate the seal judgments. [Note: E.g, Dale Ralph Davis, "The Relationship Between the Seals, Trumpets, and Bowls in the Book of Revelation," Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society16 (Summer1973):149-58; and Beale, p472.]

These are the judgments that the angel ascending from the rising of the sun held back until the bond-servants of God were sealed on their foreheads ( Revelation 7:3). Therefore, they are more severe than the first six seal judgments. Their object is to lead hostile unbelievers to repentance and to announce punitive judgments against hardened unbelievers, but few will repent ( Revelation 9:20-21).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/revelation-8.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Revelation 8:6. The prayers of the suffering Church have been heard, and the answer is to be given. Hence we are told in this verse that the seven angels prepared themselves to sound. The words are, strictly speaking, a part neither of the seventh seal nor of the first trumpet. They mark a transition point, preparatory to the latter.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/revelation-8.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

to sound = in order that (Greek. hina) they might sound (Greek. salpizo. First of ten occurences).

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/revelation-8.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound.

Sound - blow the trumpets.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/revelation-8.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(6) And the seven angels . . .—Translate, And the seven angels who had the seven trumpets prepared themselves that they might sound. The angels raised their trumpets to their mouths, ready to blow. The sounding of the trumpets introduced the series of startling events (or providences, as we sometimes call them) which serve to arrest men’s attention, and remind them that there is a kingdom which cannot be shaken. Such events are landing-stages in the great advancing progress of Christ’s kingdom. It may be well to remind those who are desirous of actual and limited historical fulfilments which correspond with the features of the several visions, that the aim of the visions seems to be to give the seer, and through him the Church at large, some idea of the general kind of events which ever mark the decay of the kingdom of wrong and the growth of the kingdom of our Lord. It is to this consummation the visions of the trumpets lead us. We are to see the destruction of those who destroy the earth, and the establishment of the kingdom of Him who will reign in righteousness (Revelation 11:15-18). This great consummation is to be achieved by slow and painful steps. “Wilt thou at this time restore the kingdom?” is the question answered by the seals. “How wilt thou restore the kingdom?” is the question answered by the trumpets. In both cases the answer is similar. These great results are not and cannot be attained in the quick ways human impatience would suggest. The history of the world is not to be folded up in a hurry, for that history is a development and a discipline; it is not only the consummation which is to be desired: the steps to that end are salutary, though painful. The chastisement which is not joyous but grievous may be the best means of bringing to the world the peaceable fruits of righteousness;—

“And man, unfriended, faltering on the way,

Must learn to weep before he learns to pray.”

And this wholesome lesson of tears must be taught the world, in the slow and bitter progress of a human history marked not by one judgment but by many. The fulfilment, then, of these prophetic visions is not exhausted in one event, however nearly its features may correspond with the character of the vision.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/revelation-8.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound.
2
Reciprocal: Joshua 6:4 - seven times;  Psalm 47:5 - sound;  Isaiah 27:13 - the great;  Revelation 9:1 - the fifth;  Revelation 9:14 - to the;  Revelation 15:1 - seven angels;  Revelation 17:14 - shall make

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/revelation-8.html.

Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation

PREPARING TO SOUND.

Revelation 8:6 "And the seven angels who had the seven trumpets prepared themselves that they might sound with their trumpets." These seven angels do not themselves execute the judgments which they announce. The four judgment angels (Revelation 9:14) are distinguished from the seven trumpet angels. The seven presence angels received their trumpets before the episode of the angel priest's intercession (v. 2). But the greatness and solemnity of the work on hand is intimated by the signs and tokens of almighty power. Now the angels prepare themselves. There is no hurry, but premonitory signs by Christ, and careful preparation by the angels, certainly indicate the serious nature of the situation, one calling for unsparing judgment.

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Scott, Walter. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Walter Scott's Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sor/revelation-8.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

The half hour silence is about to end and the four winds are about to be released; the first four angels with trumpets are about to sound.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/revelation-8.html. 1952.

Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation

Revelation 8:6

Revelation 8:6-7 And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound7 The first angel sounded, and there followed hail and fire mingled with blood, and they were cast upon the earth: and the third part of trees was burnt up, and all green grass was burnt up.

The seven angels having attended and waited on the Lord for his orders, and having received their commission from Christ, do now prepare themselves to sound their trumpets, orderly one after another.

And the first angel sounded.

By angel, here we may understand Athanasius, Paulus, Hilarius, Ofius, Paulinus, and other faithful ministers of the gospel, who lifted up their voice like a trumpet, and did bear their testimony publicly against arianism and other errors; and we may also by this angel, understand the kings of the Goths and vandals, whose religion was Arianism; they sounded a terrible alarm to the Roman Empire by their invasions. Upon which

followed hail, and fire mingled with blood;

that Isaiah, great storms of persecution, (Pleffaeus his Mystery of Iniquity, and Heirom de Chronicis), and bloody wars. (See Alaricus in Chronicis Regnorum Veterum and Helvicus in Theat Hist). Alstedius, Genserick, Atyla, and others, with their armies, destroyed Valence, that bloody Arian emperor, who caused eighty supplicants (that were sent to him from some Orthodox bishops, and other banished Christians) to be murdered.

And the third part of trees was burned up.

By trees here, we may understand, such professors of Christianity, as either bare no fruit, { Jude 1:12} or else, brought forth fruit to themselves, as { Hosea 10:1} but brought forth no fruit to perfection, as. {Luke 8:13-14} They were not trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord. { Isaiah 61:4}

Burnt up

that Isaiah, rooted up, { John 15:6} and plucked up by the roots. { Jude 1:12-13; John 15:6}

And all green grass was burned up;

that Isaiah, the ordinances of God, which are as green pastures, where Christ feeds his sheep and his lambs. { Psalm 23:1-2; Revelation 12:6; Revelation 12:14} But now both the doctrine and the ordinances of the gospel, were so corrupted that they were like grass, scorched with the heat of the sun, and so burnt up and withered, that the flocks of Christ's pastures sheep could not feed. { Amos 8:11-13; Isaiah 40:28-31; Zechariah 11:8-9} The eastern bishops and churches being so corrupted with errors and heiresses, and western bishops and churches being more orthodox and less corrupted; the bishops of Rome began to contend for supremacy, and at last obtained it. Plessaus's Mystery of Iniquity, (pp4, 44).

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Knollys, Hanserd. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Hanserd Knollys' Commentary on Revelation". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hkc/revelation-8.html.

Harold Norris' Commentary on the Book of Revelation

Verse6

Note that the judgments that come on the world are closely similar to those of the plagues in Egypt (Exodus chapters7-11). And as at the fall of Jericho the seventh trumpet blast heralded the destruction of that city, so it is in Revelation.

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Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Revelation 8:6. And the seven angels with the seven trumpets prepared themselves, to sound. Bengel: "To the angels, who had the seven vials given them, it is said: Go your ways, Revelation 16:1-2. But the angels with the trumpets do not go away ; and consequently they remain in their state of preparation, and even when they sound, still stand before God." The prayers of the saints are a necessary pre-existing condition of their preparing themselves.

The angels do not inflict the punishment, they merely announce it. Only at the sixth plague there is found, by way of exception, an active angelic agency. The angel first blows, then he looses the four angels that were bound by the great river Euphrates. Even there, however, the angel with the trumpet is not God's proper instrument for inflicting punishment, but the four angels are so.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/revelation-8.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

6.Prepared’ to sound—From the nature of trumpets and from the frequent mention of blood in the judgments of the first four, Hengstenberg concludes that the whole six are a “war” series, entirely “war.” But the trumpets of 2 Chronicles 29:25-28, were not war trumpets, but ceremonial and proclamation trumpets. The sevenfold trumpets overthrowing Jericho, typical of the overthrow of the antichristic capital, Babylon, was a bloodless overthrow. And blood within the bodily frame is “the life,” but without it, it is the symbol of death, death by any method.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/revelation-8.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Revelation 8:6 In the scheme of the trumpet-visions, as of the seal-visions, the first four are differentiated from the next three; the fifth and sixth in both cases stand by themselves and are separated by a considerable interlude from the closing seventh. It is remarkable that even the final trumpet of Revelation 11:15 f. does not correspond to the loud trumpet-blast which according to Jewish and early Christian tradition, was to awaken the dead to resurrection or to rally the saints (Matthew 24:31) at the close of the world. The Apocalypse knows nothing of this feature, nor of the tradition (preserved by R. Akiba) that the process of the resurrection would be accompanied by seven trumpet-peals from God. The first four trumpets set in motion forces of ruin that fall on natural objects; in Sap. 5:17–23 (Revelation 16:17-21) the world of nature is used directly by God to punish men. The closing three concern human life, i.e., the godless inhabitants of the earth. The general idea is that of the Jewish tradition (see on Revelation 15:2) which prefaced the second great redemption by disasters analogous to those preceding the first: cf. e.g., Sohar Exodus 4 b, tempore quo se reuelabit rex Messias, faciet Deus omnia ista miracula, prodigia et divinae uirtutis opera coram Israele, quae fecit olim in Aegypto, quemadmodum scriptum est Micah 7:15; also Jalkut Sim. i. 56 b, Targ. Jon. on Zechariah 10:11, etc. The disasters remind one now and then of the Egyptian plagues (cf. Jos. Ant. ii. 14–15; also Amos 4:4 f., Isaiah 9:7 f.). The first four visit earth, sea, waters, and the sky. Hail-showers were a traditional scourge and weapon of the divine armoury; on their association with thunderstorms see G. A. Smith’s Hist. Geog. 64, 65.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/revelation-8.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

6. Prepared to blow them. To carry out God’s decree. This is serious warning, but not final doom. Note that Trumpets affect a third of the earth – but not the whole earth.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Revelation 8:6". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/revelation-8.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.