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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Romans 12:14

Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Bless them which persecute you - Ευλογειτε, Give good words, or pray for them that give you bad words, καταρασθε, who make dire imprecations against you. Bless them, pray for them, and on no account curse them, whatever the provocation may be. Have the loving, forgiving mind that was in your Lord.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/romans-12.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Bless them … - see the note at Matthew 5:44; compare Luke 6:28.

Bless, and curse not - Bless only; or continue to bless, however long or aggravated may be the injury. Do not be provoked to anger, or to cursing, by any injury, persecution, or reviling. This is one of the most severe and difficult duties of the Christian religion; and it is a duty which nothing else but religion will enable people to perform. To curse denotes properly to devote to destruction. Where there is power to do it, it implies the destruction of the object. Thus, the fig-tree that was cursed by the Saviour soon withered away: Mark 11:21. Thus, those whom God curses will be certainly destroyed; Matthew 25:41. Where there is not power to do it, to curse implies the invoking of the aid of God to devote to destruction. Hence, it means to imprecate; to implore a curse from God to rest on others; to pray that God would destroy them. In a larger sense still, it means to abuse by reproachful words; to calumniate; or to express oneself in a violent, profane, and outrageous manner. In this passage it seems to have special reference to this.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/romans-12.html. 1870.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans

Bless them which persecute you; bless, and curse not.

Bless them which persecute you. — Calvin justly cautions us against endeavoring to find a certain order in these precepts. It is their import, and not their connection with each other, that we ought to ascertain.

Sometimes there may be a relation; at other times there is entire independence. The precept here given cannot be obeyed in its genuine sense by any who are not born again of the incorruptible seed of the word; and even to such it is a difficult duty. In proportion to their progress in the Divine life, will there be in them a difference with respect to their attainments in that heavenly spirit which enables them to comply with this injunction. But none can justly be looked on as Christians, who do not in some measure possess this spirit, and practice this precept. If this be so, how few are the genuine disciples of Christ! ‘None,’ says Calvin, ‘can boast himself to be a son of God, or glory in the name of a Christian, who has not in part put on this mind, which was in the Lord Jesus, and does not daily wrestle against and oppose the feeling of enmity and hatred. The law of God is in all respects a law of love, and the precept here enjoined contains a peculiar characteristic of Christianity, in the exhibition of which Christians are imitators of their heavenly Father. Our Lord Jesus Christ gave a signal example of obedience to this rule, when on the cross He prayed to his Father for the pardon of those by whom He was crucified.

And Stephen, the first martyr, in imitation of his Divine Master, died in calling on His name, and praying for his murderers. This precept teaches Christians in what manner, when reviled or persecuted, they ought to act to their persecutors.’ ‘Being defamed,’ says the Apostle, ‘we entreat.’ The repetition of the precept in the following clause adds to the energy of the expression. Bless and curse not. — Paul repeats the precept to bless, on account of its importance, and its applicability to men in general, in connection with a command to curse no man. How does this condemn the Church of Rome, which so frequently manifests its antichristian character by cursing its enemies, and allowing its priests to curse from the altar those who give them offense. How many are there, who, calling themselves Christians openly and without shame utter maledictions on those who irritate them!

How few abstain from imprecations of every kind and degree! f59

Rejoice with them that do rejoice and weep with them that weep.

This precept has no doubt a peculiar importance with respect to the brethren, but it is applicable in general. We ought to sympathize with our fellow-creatures in their happiness and afflictions. The meaning of the precept is quite obvious. The prosperity of others ought to inspire us with joy. Their affliction ought to affect us with sorrow. Even the very semblance of this duty among the people of the world has a beneficial influence on society, heightening the joy of prosperity, and lessening the pain of adversity.


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Bibliography
Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/romans-12.html. 1835.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

Bless them that persecute you; bless, and curse not.

In this extended enumeration of Christian obligations, most of what Paul enjoined thus far was to have been expected as the natural duties arising from the close and affectionate relationship existing in God's family of Christians; but the great and active principle of that great love which is the hallmark of true discipleship goes beyond what we might have expected. This principle begins to emerge in the preceding verse, where the "communicating" to the saints' necessities is not confined to alleviation of distress before one's very eyes, but extends to meeting those needs of which he has merely heard; and that principle emerges further in the admonition that hospitality is not merely for our friends and acquaintances, but is for strangers also. Now, in this verse, the principle is extended to encompass doing good to wicked and malevolent enemies of the child of God. Love is thus revealed as the Christian weapon against evil itself, the heavenly device by which evil itself may be overcome by good, that being the great thought with which the chapter concludes.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/romans-12.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Bless them which persecute you,.... It is the lot of God's, people in this world to be persecuted by the men of it, in some shape or another, either by words or deeds; either by reviling and reproaching them, and speaking all manner of evil of them; or by hindering them the free exercise of religious worship, by confiscation of their goods, imprisonment of their persons, by violently torturing their bodies, and taking away their lives; under all which circumstances they are taught to

bless them; that is, to pray for them, that God would show them their evil, give repentance to them, and the remission of their sins; which is the order Christ gave to his disciples, Matthew 5:44; and encouraged to an observance of, by his own example, Luke 23:34; and has been followed herein by his disciples and apostles, Acts 7:60 1 Corinthians 4:12. Moreover, by "blessing" may be meant, giving them good words, mild and soft answers, "not rendering evil for evil, railing for railing", 1 Peter 3:9; but, on the contrary, blessing, in imitation of Christ, who, "when he was reviled, reviled not again", 1 Peter 2:23, "bless",

and curse not: to have a mouth full of cursing and bitterness, Romans 3:14, is the character of an unregenerate man, and what by no means suits one who names the name of Christ; for blessing and cursing to proceed out of the same mouth, is as absurd and unnatural, as if it should be supposed that a fountain should send forth sweet water and bitter, or salt and fresh, James 3:10. The imprecations upon wicked men, used by David and other good men, are no contradictions to this rule; since they were made under the inspiration of the Spirit of God, and were predictions of God's vengeance, which in righteous judgment should fall on them, and are not to be drawn into an example by us.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/romans-12.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Bless — that is, Call down by prayer a blessing on.

them which persecute you, etc. — This is taken from the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:44), which, from the allusions made to it, seems to have been the storehouse of Christian morality among the churches.


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/romans-12.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

And curse not (και μη καταραστεkai mē katarāsthe). Present middle imperative with μηmē Like Matthew 5:44 in spirit, not a quotation, but a reminiscence of the words of Jesus. The negative addition gives emphasis. See Luke 6:28 for the old verb καταραομαιkataraomai from καταραkatara (curse).


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/romans-12.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Bless ( εὐλογεῖτε )

See on blessed, 1 Peter 1:3.

Them that persecute ( τοὺς διώκοντας )

See on John 5:16. It has been suggested that the verb pursuing in Romans 12:13may have suggested the persecutors here. Pursue hospitality toward the brethren as the wicked pursue them.

Curse not

Plutarch relates that when a decree was issued that Alcibiades should be solemnly cursed by all the priests and priestesses, one of the latter declared that her holy office obliged her to make prayers, but not execrations (“Alcibiades”).


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/romans-12.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Bless them which persecute you: bless, and curse not.

Curse not — No, not in your heart.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/romans-12.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

14.Bless them, etc. I wish, once for all, to remind the reader, that he is not scrupulously to seek a precise order as to the precepts here laid down, but must be content to have short precepts, unconnected, though suited to the formation of a holy life, and such as are deduced from the principle the Apostle laid down at the beginning of the chapter.

He will presently give direction respecting the retaliation of the injuries which we may suffer: but here he requires something even more difficult, — that we are not to imprecate evils on our enemies, but to wish and to pray God to render all things prosperous to them, how much soever they may harass and cruelly treat us: and this kindness, the more difficult it is to be practiced, so with the more intense desire we ought to strive for it; for the Lord commands nothing, with respect to which he does not require our obedience; nor is any excuse to be allowed, if we are destitute of that disposition, by which the Lord would have his people to differ from the ungodly and the children of this world.

Arduous is this, I admit, and wholly opposed to the nature of man; but there is nothing too arduous to be overcome by the power of God, which shall never be wanting to us, provided we neglect not to seek for it. And though you can hardly find one who has made such advances in the law of the Lord that he fulfills this precept, yet no one can claim to be the child of God or glory in the name of a Christian, who has not in part attained this mind, and who does not daily resist the opposite disposition.

I have said that this is more difficult than to let go revenge when any one is injured: for though some restrain their hands and are not led away by the passion of doing harm, they yet wish that some calamity or loss would in some way happen to their enemies; and even when they are so pacified that they wish no evil, there is yet hardly one in a hundred who wishes well to him from whom he has received an injury; nay, most men daringly burst forth into imprecations. But God by his word not only restrains our hands from doing evil, but also subdues the bitter feelings within; and not only so, but he would have us to be solicitous for the wellbeing of those who unjustly trouble us and seek our destruction.

[Erasmus ] was mistaken in the meaning of the verb γεῖν to bless; for he did not perceive that it stands opposed to curses and maledictions: for Paul would have God in both instances to be a witness of our patience, and to see that we not only bridle in our prayers the violence of our wrath, but also show by praying for pardon that we grieve at the lot of our enemies when they willfully ruin themselves.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/romans-12.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

14 Bless them which persecute you: bless, and curse not.

Ver. 14. Bless them] {See Trapp on "Matthew 5:44"}


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/romans-12.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

The apostle having taught us our duty to our friends in the former verse, teacheth us our duty here towards our enemies. Bless them that persecute you: that is, pray for them, and wish well to them, whatever provocation you may have to the contrary.

Learn hence, 1. That good men must make account of, and prepare for, persecution; either the persecution of the tongue, or of the hand, or of both.

Learn, 2. That it is their duty ever to bless, never to curse, their persecutors and opposers; Bless, but curse not.

Where note, That the apootle doubles the exhortation, Bless your persecutors, bless and curse not. This doubling the exhortation, shows both the difficulty of the duty, how contrary it is to corrupt nature; and also the constancy of the duty, we must ever bless, and never curse: always wish well, never any ill, to the worst of men. Take we great heed of giving way to secret wishes of hurt to our enemy. God forbid we should hurt ourselves by sinful passion, because others hurt us by slander and false accusation. We are naturally prone to speak ill of others, and to wish ill to others, with delight; this sin persisted in, shuts out of heaven as well as murder.


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Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/romans-12.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

14.] “The Sermon on the Mount must have been particularly well known; for among the few references in the N. T. Epistles to the direct words of Christ there occur several to it: e.g. 1 Corinthians 7:10. James 4:9; James 5:12 (we may add Romans 4:3; Romans 1:2; Romans 1:22, Romans 2:5; Romans 2:13; Romans 5:2-3; Romans 5:10). 1 Peter 3:9; 1 Peter 3:14; 1 Peter 4:14.” Tholuck.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/romans-12.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 12:14. τοὺς διώκ. ὑμ.] who persecute you (in any respect whatever). The saying of Christ, Matthew 5:44, was perhaps known to the apostle and here came to his recollection, without his having read however, as Reiche here again assumes (comp. on Romans 2:19), the Gospels.


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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/romans-12.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Romans 12:14. διώκοντας, persecuting) for the sake of Christ.— καὶ μὴ καταρᾶσθε, curse not) not even in thought.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/romans-12.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Bless them which persecute you; i.e. pray for them, and wish well to them. This is borrowed from Matthew 5:44 Luke 6:28: see the like in 1 Peter 3:9. This is commended to us by the example of Christ himself, Isaiah 53:12 Luke 23:34 1 Peter 2:23; of Stephen, Acts 7:60; of Paul, and the primitive Christians, 1 Corinthians 4:12.

Bless, and curse not: his doubling the exhortation shows the difficulty of the duty; it is contrary to corrupt nature: and it denotes the constancy of it; we must persevere therein. When he saith, curse not, he means, wish no evil to your enemies.

Objection. The prophets and apostles went contrary to this: see 2 Kings 2:24 Psalms 69:22,23 Ac 8:20 13:10,11 23:3.

Answer. These did it by a special vocation and instinct of the Spirit.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Romans 12:14". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/romans-12.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Good men will desire to do good, not to friends only, or such as do good to them, but also to enemies, and such as do evil. The characters of men are more clearly seen by their treatment of enemies, than of friends. Luke 6:32-36.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/romans-12.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

14. εὐλογεῖτε κ.τ.λ. Cf. Luke 6:28 (Matthew 5:44); 1 Corinthians 4:12; 1 Peter 3:9. This clause inserted here shows that the order is not systematic.


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"Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/romans-12.html. 1896.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

14. “Bless them that persecute you, bless and scold not.” You must remember that this chapter is all addressed not simply to Christians, but to the sanctified, beautifully setting forth their attitude and deportment before the world. The word here does not mean to indulge in profanity, but to scold, which is utterly incompatible with the gospel standard of Christian living.


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Godbey, William. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/romans-12.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Bless those who persecute you, bless, and curse not.’

The first call is to bless those who persecute us, and not to curse them. The first clause basically repeats the teaching of Jesus, where He said, ‘pray for those who persecute you’ (Matthew 5:44; compare Luke 6:28; 1 Peter 3:9), where the intention was to have their well-being at heart. The last three words echo the words of James in James 3:9-11, ‘out of the same mouth come blessing and cursing -- these things ought not to be’. Both can be seen as fulfilling Jesus’ requirement that we love our enemies (Matthew 5:44; Luke 6:27; Luke 6:35). Such an attitude towards persecution was unknown in the ancient world. Thus the Christian is to respond to persecution with words of love. He is to accept his persecution as from the hand of God. Indeed he is to rejoice in it knowing that great is his reward in Heaven (Matthew 5:11-12).


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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/romans-12.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Paul repeated Jesus" instruction here ( Matthew 5:44; Luke 6:27-28). To persecute means to pursue. Blessing involves both wishing God"s best on people and praying for them.

"The principle of nonretaliation for personal injury permeates the entire New Testament." [Note: Mounce, p239.]


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/romans-12.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Romans 12:14. Bless them that persecute you, etc. ‘The saying of Christ, Matthew 5:44, was perhaps known to the Apostle and here came to his recollection’ (Meyer). It is quite unlikely, however, that he had read the gospel of Matthew. The Sermon on the Mount was, doubtless, well known through oral transmission, and there are allusions to it in the Epistles (chap. Romans 2:19; 1 Corinthians 7:10; James 4:9; James 5:12; 1 Peter 3:14; 1 Peter 4:14). The word rendered ‘persecute’ is the same as that in the last clause of Romans 12:13; an intentional play on words. Probably the change of form to the imperative shows how difficult a duty this was felt to be. ‘How hard this is for corrupt human nature, every one who is acquainted with his own heart well knows. Yet this is the standard of Christian temper and character exhibited in the Scriptures’ (Hodge). Hardest of all is the duty when the persecutor is a professed Christian brother.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/romans-12.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Romans 12:14. εὐλογεῖτε τοὺς διώκοντας, εὐλ. κ. μὴ καταρᾶσθε: not a quotation of Matthew 5:44, but probably a reminiscence of the same saying of Jesus. The change in construction from participle to imperative, the participle being resumed in the next sentence, suggests that the form of the sentence was given to Paul—i.e., he was consciously using borrowed words without modifying them to suit the sentence he had begun on his own account. It may be that when Paul said διώκοντες in Romans 12:13, the other sense of the word passed through his mind and prompted Romans 12:14; but even if we could be sure of this (which we cannot) we should not understand either verse a whit better.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/romans-12.html. 1897-1910.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Romans 12:14 Bless them that persecute you; bless, and curse not.

"Call down blessings on your persecutors--blessings, not curses" (NEB) (Luke 6:28; Luke 23:34; Acts 7:60). "To curse does not mean to use ordinary profanity; it is a call for calamity to befall a person." (Whiteside p. 253) Pray for their salvation, instead of their damnation! We don"t need to "call down curses" upon the enemies of Christ, for their own sins already condemn them. Evil is coming upon our persecutors, there is no need to call it down. (Matthew 25:41; 2 Thessalonians 1:7-9). Our desire should be for the salvation of all. (1 Timothy 2:4; Acts 26:29)

"bless"-i.e. pray for them (Matthew 5:44)

"Don"t tell me we can"t live that way. Tell me we don"t; tell me we won"t; but don"t tell me we can"t...Rees cuts to the bone when he parodies: "I would like to buy $3 worth of God, please, not enough to explode my soul or disturb my sleep..just enough to equal a cup of warm milk or a snooze in the sunshine. I don"t want enough of him to make me love a black man...I want ecstasy, not transformation; I want the warmth of the womb, not a new birth. I want a pound of the Eternal in a paper sack. I would like to buy $3 worth of God please."" (McGuiggan p. 371)


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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/romans-12.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

which = that.

persecute. The Same Greek. word as for "given to", Romans 12:13.


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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/romans-12.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Bless them which persecute you: bless, and curse not.

Bless (that is, Wish and call down by prayer a blessing on) them which persecute you: bless, and curse not. This precept is taken from the Sermon on the Mount, which, from the numerous allusions to it, more or less direct, in different parts of the New Testament, seems to have been the storehouse of Christian morality among the churches.


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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/romans-12.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

Ask God to bless. If you can do this, you are a transformed person! See note on Matthew 5:44. Christ did this as he hung on the cross!!!


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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/romans-12.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(14) Bless them which persecute you.—Apparently with allusion to Matthew 5:44. It was probably just about the time that St. Paul was writing this Epistle, or at most a year or two later, that the series of compositions which ultimately took the shape of our present Gospels began. It is not, however, necessary to suppose that St. Paul had actually seen one of these. The record of our Lord’s teaching was no doubt at first preserved and circulated in the Church orally, and it would be in this form that St. Paul first became acquainted with the precept to which he here seems to allude. There is, perhaps, another reference to the Sermon on the Mount in 1 Corinthians 7:10. Such references occur (as we should expect) more frequently in the Epistle of St. James.


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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/romans-12.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Bless them which persecute you: bless, and curse not.
21; Job 31:29,30; Matthew 5:44; Luke 6:28; 23:34; Acts 7:60; 1 Corinthians 4:12,13; 1 Thessalonians 5:15; James 3:10; 1 Peter 2:21-23; 3:9

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/romans-12.html.

Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

Bless them which persecute you; bless, and curse not. The exercise of love, and the discharge of the duties of benevolence, are not to be confined to the saints, or people of God; but the same spirit is to be manifested towards our enemies. The word ( εὐλογέω) rendered to bless, signifies both to pray for good to anyone, and to do good. Here, from the context, the former meaning is to be preferred, as it is opposed to cursing, which signifies to imprecate evil on anyone. The command therefore is, that, so far from wishing or praying that evil may overtake our persecutors and enemies, we must sincerely desire and pray for their good. It is not sufficient to avoid returning evil for evil, nor even to banish vindictive feelings; we must be able sincerely to desire their happiness. How hard this is for corrupt human nature, everyone who is acquainted with his own heart well knows. Yet this is the standard of Christian temper and character exhibited in the Scriptures, Matthew 5:44. "Ardua res est, fateor, et naturae hominis penitus contraria; sed nihil tam arduum, quod non virtute Dei superetur, quae nobis nunquam deerit, modo ne ipsam invocare negligamus. Et quanquam vix unum reperias qui tantos in lege Dei progressus fecerit, ut praeceptum istud impleat; nemo tamen filium Dei jactare se potest, aut Christiani nomine gloriari, qui non animum istum ex parte induerit, et cum affectu adverso quotidie pugnet. Dixi hoc esse difficilius quam remittere vindictam, ubi quis laesus fuerit. Quidam eniu licet manus contineant, neque etiam agentur nocendi libidine, cuperent tamen aliunde hostibus suis accidere cladem vel damnum. Deus autem verbo suo non tantum manus coercet a malcficiis, sed amarulentos quoque affectus in animis domat; neque id modo, sed etiam vult de eorum salute esse sollicitos qui nos injuste vexando sibi exitium accersunt." — Calvin.


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Bibliography
Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on Romans 12:14". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/romans-12.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Wednesday, October 16th, 2019
the Week of Proper 23 / Ordinary 28
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