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New Living Translation

Psalms 42:5

Why am I discouraged? Why is my heart so sad? I will put my hope in God! I will praise him again— my Savior and

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:

- Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Desire;   Doubting;   Faith;   Thompson Chain Reference - Afflictions;   Comfort;   Comfort-Misery;   Desire;   Desire-Satisfaction;   Hunger;   Promises, Divine;   Spiritual;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Affliction, Consolation under;   Despair;   Praise;   Resignation;  

Dictionaries:

- American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Korah;   Poetry of the Hebrews;   Psalms, the Book of;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Hope;   Psalms, book of;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Presence of God;   Soul;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Poetry;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - English Versions;   Greek Versions of Ot;   Hope;   Jonah;   Korah, Korahites;   Music and Musical Instruments;   Prayer;   Psalms;   Sin;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Psalms (2);   People's Dictionary of the Bible - David;   God;   Korah;   Psalms the book of;  

Encyclopedias:

- International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Cast;   Countenance;   Help;   Music;   Praise;   Psalms, Book of;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Bible Canon;   Psalms;  

Devotionals:

- Every Day Light - Devotion for December 31;  

Parallel Translations

Amplified Bible
Why are you in despair, O my soul? And why have you become restless and disturbed within me? Hope in God and wait expectantly for Him, for I shall again praise Him For the help of His presence.
Easy-to-Read Version
Why am I so sad? Why am I so upset? I tell myself, "Wait for God's help! You will again be able to praise him, your God, the one who will save you." In my sadness I say, "I will remember you from here on this small hill, where Mount Hermon and the Jordan River meet." <
English Standard Version
Why are you cast down, O my soul, and why are you in turmoil within me? Hope in God; for I shall again praise him, my salvation
THE MESSAGE
Why are you down in the dumps, dear soul? Why are you crying the blues? Fix my eyes on God— soon I'll be praising again. He puts a smile on my face. He's my God.
New International Version (1984)
Why are you downcast, O my soul? Why so disturbed within me? Put your hope in God, for I will yet praise him, my Savior and
Geneva Bible (1587)
Why art thou cast downe, my soule, and vnquiet within me? waite on God: for I will yet giue him thankes for the helpe of his presence.
George Lamsa Translation
Why are you troubled, O my soul? and why are you bewildered? Trust in God; for I shall yet praise him, the Saviour of my honour and my God.
Hebrew Names Version
Why are you in despair, my soul? Why are you disturbed within me? Hope in God! For I shall still praise him for the saving help of his presence.
JPS Old Testament (1917)
These things I remember, and pour out my soul within me, {N}with the voice of joy and praise, a multitude keeping holyday.
King James Version (1611)
Why art thou cast downe, O my soule, and why art thou disquieted in me? hope thou in God, for I shall yet praise him for the helpe of his countenance.
Literal Translation
O my soul, why are you cast down and moan within me? Hope in God, for I shall yet thank Him for the salvation of His presence.
Miles Coverdale Bible (1535)
O put thy trust in God, for I wil yet geue him thankes, for the helpe of his countenauce.
New American Standard Version
Why are you in despair, O my soul? And why have you become disturbed within me? Hope in God, for I shall again praise Him For the help of His presence.
King James Version
Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted in me? hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him for the help of his countenance.
Contemporary English Version
Why am I discouraged? Why am I restless? I trust you! And I will praise you again because you help me,
Complete Jewish Bible
I recall, as my feelings well up within me, how I'd go with the crowd to the house of God, with sounds of joy and praise from the throngs observing the festival.
Amplified Bible
Why are you in despair, O my soul? And why have you become restless and disturbed within me? Hope in God and wait expectantly for Him, for I shall again praise Him For the help of His presence.
American Standard Version
Why art thou cast down, O my soul? And why art thou disquieted within me? Hope thou in God; for I shall yet praise him For the help of his countenance.
Bible in Basic English
Why are you crushed down, O my soul? and why are you troubled in me? put your hope in God; for I will again give him praise who is my help and my God.
Brenton's Septuagint (LXX)
Wherefore art thou very sad, O my soul? and wherefore dost thou trouble me? hope in God; for I will give thanks to him; he is the salvation of my countenance.
English Revised Version
Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted within me? hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him for the health of his countenance.
The Holy Bible, Berean Study Bible
Why are you downcast, O my soul? Why the unease within me? Put your hope in God, for I shall yet praise Him for the salvation of His presence.
Good News Translation
Why am I so sad? Why am I so troubled? I will put my hope in God, and once again I will praise him, my savior and my God.
World English Bible
Why are you in despair, my soul? Why are you disturbed within me? Hope in God! For I shall still praise him for the saving help of his presence.
New Century Version
Why am I so sad? Why am I so upset? I should put my hope in God and keep praising him, my Savior and
New English Translation
Why are you depressed, O my soul? Why are you upset? Wait for God! For I will again give thanks to my God for his saving intervention.
New International Version
Why, my soul, are you downcast? Why so disturbed within me? Put your hope in God, for I will yet praise him, my Savior and my God.
New King James Version
Why are you cast down, O my soul?And why are you disquieted within me?Hope in God, for I shall yet praise HimFor the help of His countenance. [fn]
New Revised Standard
Why are you cast down, O my soul, and why are you disquieted within me? Hope in God; for I shall again praise him, my help
J.B. Rotherham Emphasized Bible
Why shouldst thou be cast down, O my soul? And why shouldst thou moan over me? Wait thou for God, for yet shall I praise him, As the triumph of my presence.
Douay-Rheims Bible
(41-6) Why art thou sad, O my soul? and why dost thou trouble me? Hope in God, for I will still give praise to him: the salvation of my countenance,
Revised Standard Version
Why are you cast down, O my soul, and why are you disquieted within me? Hope in God; for I shall again praise him, my help
Update Bible Version
Why are you cast down, O my soul? And [why] are you disquieted inside me? Hope in God; for I shall yet praise him, my salvation
Christian Standard Bible®
Why am I so depressed? Why this turmoil within me? Put your hope in God, for I will still praise Him, my Savior and my God.
New Life Bible
Why are you sad, O my soul? Why have you become troubled within me? Hope in God, for I will praise Him again for His help of being near me.
Bishop's Bible (1568)
Why art thou so discouraged O my soule, & why art thou so vnquiet within me? attende thou vpon the Lorde, for I will yet acknowledge him only to be a present saluation.
Darby Translation
Why art thou cast down, my soul, and art disquieted in me? hope in God; for I shall yet praise him, [for] the health of his countenance.
Lexham English Bible
Why are you in despair, O my soul, and disturbed within me? Hope in God, because I will again praise him, for the salvation of his presence.
Webster's Bible Translation
Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and [why] art thou disquieted in me? hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him [for] the help of his countenance.
Wycliffe Bible (1395)
Mi soule, whi art thou sory; and whi disturblist thou me? Hope thou in God, for yit Y schal knouleche to hym; he is the helthe of my cheer,
Young's Literal Translation
What! bowest thou thyself, O my soul? Yea, art thou troubled within me? Wait for God, for still I confess Him: The salvation of my countenance -- My God!

Why bow yourself, O my soul? Indeed, are you troubled within me? Wait for God, for I still confess Him: The salvation of my countenance—my God!

Contextual Overview

5 Why am I discouraged? Why is my heart so sad? I will put my hope in God! I will praise him again— my Savior and

Bible Verse Review

from
Treasury of Scripure Knowledge

Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted in me? hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him for the help of his countenance.
Why art thou cast down Heb. Why art thou bowed down.
11; 35:14; 43:5; 55:4,5; 61:2; 142:2,3; 143:3,4; 1 Samuel 30:6; Mark 14:33,34
hope
27:13,14; 37:7; 56:3,11; 71:14; Job 13:15; Isaiah 50:10; Lamentations 3:24-26; Romans 4:18-20; Hebrews 10:36,37
praise him
or, give thanks. for the help, etc. or, his presence is salvation.
44:3; 91:15,16; Numbers 6:26; Matthew 1:23; 28:20
Reciprocal: Genesis 49:6 - O my soul;  Psalm 4:6 - lift;  Psalm 6:3 - My;  Psalm 11:7 - his;  Psalm 38:6 - bowed;  Psalm 62:5 - soul;  Psalm 131:2 - quieted;  Psalm 145:14 - raiseth up;  Isaiah 36:7 - We trust;  Jeremiah 4:19 - O my;  Lamentations 3:20 - humbled;  Jonah 2:7 - I remembered;  Luke 13:11 - bowed;  John 14:1 - not;  Acts 2:28 - make;  Romans 5:4 - and experience;  2 Corinthians 4:9 - cast;  1 Thessalonians 5:8 - the hope;  Hebrews 6:19 - both;  1 Peter 1:21 - your

Cross-References

Genesis 12:10
At that time a severe famine struck the land of Canaan, forcing Abram to go down to Egypt, where he lived as a foreigner.
Genesis 26:1
A severe famine now struck the land, as had happened before in Abraham's time. So Isaac moved to Gerar, where Abimelech, king of the Philistines, lived.
Genesis 41:57
And people from all around came to Egypt to buy grain from Joseph because the famine was severe throughout the world.
Acts 7:11
"But a famine came upon Egypt and Canaan. There was great misery, and our ancestors ran out of food.
Acts 11:28
One of them named Agabus stood up in one of the meetings and predicted by the Spirit that a great famine was coming upon the entire Roman world. (This was fulfilled during the reign of Claudius.)

Gill's Notes on the Bible

Why art thou cast down, O my soul?.... The psalmist corrects himself, as being too much depressed in spirit with his present circumstances, and expostulates with himself; adding,

and why art thou disquieted in me? which suggests, that the dejections of God's people are unreasonable ones; sin itself is no just cause and reason of them; for though it is very disagreeable, loathsome, and abhorring, troublesome and burdensome, to a spiritual man, and is ingenuously confessed, and heartily mourned over, and is matter of humiliation; yet no true reason of dejection: because there is forgiveness of it with God; the blood of Christ has been shed for the remission of it; it has been bore and done away by him; nor is there any condemnation for it to them that are in him; and though it rages, and threatens to get the ascendant; yet it is promised it shall not have the dominion over the saints; neither the nature of it, being great, as committed against God himself, nor the multitude of sins, nor the aggravated circumstances of them, are just causes of dejection, since the blood of Christ cleanses from all sin; nor are Satan and his temptations; he is indeed an enemy, very powerful, subtle, and terrible; he is the strong man armed, the old serpent, and a roaring lion; and his temptations are very troublesome and grieving; and it becomes the saints to be upon their guard against him and them; but they have no reason to be cast down on account hereof; for God, who is on the side of his people, is mightier than he; Christ is stronger than the strong man armed, and the divine Spirit who is in them is greater than he that is in the world: Satan is under divine restraints, and can go no further in tempting than he is suffered, and his temptations are overruled for good; besides, good armour is provided for the Christian to fight against him with, and in a short time he will be bruised under his feet: nor are the hidings of God's face a sufficient reason of dejection; for though such a case is very distressing, and gives great trouble to those that love the Lord; nor can they, nor does it become them to sit easy and unconcerned in such circumstances, as they are great trials of faith and patience; yet it is the experience of the people of God in all ages: some good ends are answered hereby, as to bring saints to a sense of sins, which has deprived them of the divine Presence, to make them prize it the more when they have it, and to be careful of losing it for the future. Besides, the love of God continues the same when he hides and chides; and he will return again, and will not finally and totally forsake his people; and in a little while they shall be for ever with him, and see him as he is; and though by one providence or another they may be deprived for a while of the word, worship, and ordinances of God, he that provides a place for his church, and feeds and nourishes her in the wilderness, can make up the lack of such enjoyments by his presence and Spirit. The means and methods the psalmist took to remove his dejections and disquietudes of mind are as follow;

hope thou in God; for the pardon of sin; for which there is good ground of hope, and so no reason to be cast down on account of it; for strength against Satan's temptations, which is to be had in Christ, as well as righteousness; and for the appearance of God, and the discoveries of his love, who has his set time to favour his people, and therefore to be hoped, and quietly waited for. Hope is of great use against castings down; it is an helmet, an erector of the head, which keeps it upright, and from bowing down: it is an anchor of the soul, sure and steadfast, and is of great service in the troubles of life, and against the fears of death;

for I shall yet praise him for the help of his countenance; or "the salvations of his countenance"; which implies that the psalmist believed, notwithstanding his present circumstances, that he should have salvation upon salvation; salvation of every kind; or a full and complete one, which should spring, not from any merits of his, but from the free grace and favour of God, expressed in his gracious countenance towards him; and also intimates, that the light of his countenance would be salvation to him now; and that his consummate happiness hereafter would lie in beholding his face for evermore: all which would give him occasion and opportunity of praising the Lord. Now such a faith and persuasion as this is a good antidote against dejections of soul, and disquietude of mind; see Psalm 27:13.

Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Why art thou cast down, O my soul? - Margin, bowed down. The Hebrew word means to bow down, to incline oneself; then, usually, to prostrate oneself as in public worship; and then, to sink down under the weight of sorrow; to be depressed and sad. The Septuagint renders it, “Why art thou grieved?” - περίλυπος perilupos So the Vulgate. This is an earnest remonstrance addressed by himself to his own soul, as if there were really no occasion for this excessive depression; as if he cherished his grief improperly. There was a brighter side, and he ought to turn to that, and take a more cheerful view of the matter. He had allowed his mind to rest on the dark side, to look at the discouraging things in his condition. He now felt that this was in some measure voluntary, or had been indulged too freely, and that it was wrong: that it was proper for a man like him to seek for comfort in brighter views; that it was a duty which he owed to himself and to the cause of religion to take brighter views. We may remark,

(1) That there are two sides to the events which occur, and which seem so discouraging to us - a dark side and a bright side.

(2) That in certain states of mind, connected often with a diseased nervous system, we are prone to look only on the dark side, to see only what is gloomy and discouraging.

(3) That this often becomes in a sense voluntary, and that we find a melancholy satisfaction in being miserable, and in making ourselves more unhappy, as if we had been wronged, and as if there were a kind of virtue in dejection and gloom - in “refusing,” like Rachel, “to be comforted” Jeremiah 31:15; perhaps also feeling as if by this we were deserving of the divine approbation, and laying the foundation for some claim to favor on the score of merit.

(4) That in this we are often eminently guilty, as putting away those consolations which God has provided for us; as if a man, under the influence of some morbid feeling, should find a kind of melancholy pleasure in starving himself to death in the midst of a garden full of fruit, or dying of thirst by, the side of a running fountain. And

(5) That it is the duty of the people of God to look at the bright side of things; to think of the past mercies of God; to survey the blessings which surround us still; to look to the future, in this world and the next, with hope; and to come to God, and cast the burden on him. It is a part of religious duty to be cheer ful; and a man may often do more real good by a cheerful and submissive mind in times of affliction, than he could by much active effort in the days of health, plenty, and prosperity. Every sad and desponding Christian ought to say to his soul, “Why art thou thus cast down?”

And why art thou disquieted in me? - Troubled, sad. The word means literally,

(1) to growl as a bear;

(2) to sound, or make a noise, as a harp, rain, waves;

(3) to be agitated, troubled, or anxious in mind: to moan internally. See the notes at Isaiah 16:11; compare Jeremiah 48:36.

Hope thou in God - That is, trust in him, with the hope that he will interpose and restore thee to the privileges and comforts heretofore enjoyed. The soul turns to God when all other hope fails, and finds comfort in the belief that he can and will aid us.

For I shall yet praise him - Margin, give thanks. The idea is, that he would yet have occasion to give him thanks for his merciful interposition. This implies a strong assurance that these troubles would not last always.

For the help of his countenance - literally, “the salvations of his face,” or his presence. The original word rendered help is in the plural number, meaning salvations; and the idea in the use of the plural is, that his deliverance would be completed or entire - as if double or manifold. The meaning of the phrase “help of his countenance” or “face,” is that God would look favorably or benignly upon him. Favor is expressed in the Scriptures by lifting up the light of the countenance on one. See the notes at Psalm 4:6; compare Psalm 11:7; Psalm 21:6; Psalm 44:3; Psalm 89:15. This closes the first part of the psalm, expressing the confident belief of the psalmist that God would yet interpose, and that his troubles would have an end; reposing entire confidence in God as the only ground of hope; and expressing the feeling that when that confidence exists the soul should not be dejected or cast down.

Clarke's Notes on the Bible

Why art thou cast down, O my soul? - Bad as the times are, desolate as Jerusalem is, insulting as are our enemies, hopeless as in the sight of man our condition may be, yet there is no room for despair. All things are possible to God. We have a promise of restoration; he is as good as he is powerful; hope therefore in him.

I shall yet praise him - For my restoration from this captivity. He is the health of my soul. I shall have the light and help of his countenance, his approbation, and a glorious deliverance wrought by his right hand.