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Sunday, April 21st, 2024
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Bible Commentaries
Hebrews 8

Contending for the FaithContending for the Faith

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Verse 1

The High Priest of the Heavenly Sanctuary

Now of the things which we have spoken this is the sum: We have such an high priest, who is set on the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in the heavens;

Now of the things which we have spoken this is the sum: Paul introduces a new topic about the duties of the high priest. By the word "sum (kephalaion)," Paul does not mean he intends to summarize what he has said; rather he means "the chief or main point, the principal thing" (Thayer 345). Paul is calling his readers’ attention to the main points of the teaching up to this point. The conclusion of all that Paul has taught is that Jesus is now our High Priest.

We have such an high priest, who is set on the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in the heavens: The word "such" (toioutos) means "of this kind or sort" (Thayer 627). Paul shows the vast difference between Jesus and the Jewish high priests, saying, in Jesus, we have a High Priest "who is set on the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in the heavens." The "throne" (thronos) of the "Majesty" (megalosune) is a metaphor referring to the ruler of the universe, that is, "the majesty of God" (Thayer 394), who is now in the "heavens" (ouranos). Thayer says heaven is "the region above the sidereal heavens...where God dwells and the other heavenly beings" (465). Paul’s first point (see 1:3) is that Jesus, our new High Priest, has taken His position in heaven at God’s right hand:

And every priest standeth daily ministering and offering oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins: But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God; From henceforth expecting till his enemies be made his footstool (10:11-13)

Verse 2

A minister of the sanctuary, and of the true tabernacle, which the Lord pitched, and not man.

A minister of the sanctuary: Secondly, Paul describes the High Priest we have in Jesus Christ. Not only is Jesus at the right hand of God, but He is also "a minister of the sanctuary." The term "minister" (leitourgos) means Jesus is a "servant…one busied with holy things" (Thayer 376). Jesus is the servant, the High Priest of the New Covenant. The "sanctuary" (hagio) is "the most hallowed portion of the temple, ’the holy of holies’ " (Thayer 6). The "sanctuary" of the earthly tabernacle was the part behind the veil where the presence of God was; however, in this context, the "sanctuary" is "used figuratively of heaven" (Thayer 7) where God is with Jesus on His "right hand" (verse 1). Kendrick explains Jesus’ part in the sanctuary:

As King, Christ sits at the right hand of the throne of God; as Priest, he ministers in the heavenly holy of holies, in the perpetual presence of God. Both expressions are mere figures drawn from earthly objects. His sharing God’s throne denotes symbolically, his sharing God’s sovereign power; his being in the heavenly sanctuary denotes his being in the immediate and absolute, not the symbolical, presence of God (98).

and of the true tabernacle: Thirdly, Paul says Jesus is a servant of the "true tabernacle." A literal "tabernacle" (skene) is a "tent …(or a) well known movable temple of God after the pattern of which the temple at Jerusalem was subsequently built" (Thayer 577-578); however, Paul refers to a "true tabernacle," which indicates a "heavenly temple" (Thayer 578) or the "genuine one" (Vincent 468). The adjective "true" (alethinos) signifies this tabernacle is different from ordinary tabernacles made by the hands of man. The "true tabernacle" is the same as the "more perfect tabernacle" he refers to in chapter nine, verse 11. This tabernacle is "in every respect corresponding to the idea signified by the name, real and true, genuine…it contrasts realities with their semblances" (Thayer 27). Just as the sanctuary denotes heaven, so does the "true tabernacle" refer to heaven. Heaven is the genuine tabernacle, of which the earthly one was but a copy.

which the Lord pitched, and not man: That the "sanctuary" refers to heaven is proved by Paul’s words: "which the Lord pitched, and not man." The term "pitched" (pegnumi) proves the original tabernacle was "fasten(ed) together" (Thayer 508) or constructed by the Lord, Himself, and not by man.

Verse 3

For every high priest is ordained to offer gifts and sacrifices: wherefore it is of necessity that this man have somewhat also to offer.

For every high priest is ordained to offer gifts and sacrifices: Paul repeats this statement from chapter five in which he proves the essential function of every high priest was to offer gifts and sacrifices (see 5:1 for explanation of gifts and sacrifices).

wherefore it is of necessity that this man have somewhat also to offer: The term "necessity" (anagkaios) means "what ought according to the law of duty to be done, what is required by the condition of things" (Thayer 36). Since Jesus has been proved to be the High Priest in the heavenly sanctuary and the duty of the priest is to offer gifts and sacrifices, there is a "necessity" that He, too, must have something to offer. The earthly priest offered the sacrifices of the blood of animals; however, Jesus’ offering of a heavenly nature is His continuing blood to cleanse the sins of man. Paul emphasizes this message in this chapter and in chapter nine; however, his clearest statement is as follows:

But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building; Neither by the blood of goats and calves, but by his own blood he entered in once into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption for us. For if the blood of bulls and of goats, and the ashes of an heifer sprinkling the unclean, sanctifieth to the purifying of the flesh: How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God? (9:11-14).

The earthly sacrifices had to be offered daily; however, Jesus’ heavenly offering was a one-time offering as Paul emphasizes:

Who (referring to Jesus) needeth not daily, as those high priests, to offer up sacrifice, first for his own sins, and then for the people’s: for this he did once, when he offered up himself (7:27).

For Christ is not entered into the holy places made with hands, which are the figures of the true; but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us: Nor yet that he should offer himself often, as the high priest entereth into the holy place every year with blood of others; For then must he often have suffered since the foundation of the world: but now once in the end of the world hath he appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself. And as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment: So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation (9:24-28).

The offering that our High Priest, Jesus, made is so superior to all earthly offerings that it was necessary to make this sacrifice only one time. Paul builds on this fact beginning with verse 4.

For if he were on earth, he should not be a priest, seeing that there are priests that offer gifts according to the law:

For if he were on earth, he should not be a priest: The word "For" looks back to the preceding clause, showing the priest must "have somewhat also to offer." If Christ had not died and had remained on earth, or even if He had died and had arisen but had remained on earth, He would not have been a priest, much less a High Priest. He was not of the tribe of Levi; therefore, He would not have legally been allowed to offer the sacrifices.

seeing that there are priests that offer gifts according to the law: The plural word "gifts" is equivalent to the "gifts and sacrifices" mentioned in verse 3 and refers to all sacrifices the priests under the Levitical priesthood offered. These sacrifices were abolished when Jesus died on the cross of Calvary. In Colossians 2:14, Paul says, "Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross." Jesus’ death brought an end to animal sacrifices as Paul mentions later in this epistle, saying:

But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building; Neither by the blood of goats and calves, but by his own blood he entered in once into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption for us (9:11-12).

Since Jesus did not remain on earth and He is the High Priest of the "true tabernacle" (verse 2), He offered His sacrifice (His life) one time for all times.

Who serve unto the example and shadow of heavenly things, as Moses was admonished of God when he was about to make the tabernacle: for, See, saith he, that thou make all things according to the pattern shewed to thee in the mount. Who serve unto the example and shadow of heavenly things:

The Levitical priests "serve" (latreuo) or officiate by "discharge(ing) the sacred office" (Thayer 373). The term "example" (hupodeigma) means "a sign suggestive of anything, delineation of a thing, representation, figure, (or a) copy" (Thayer 642); and the word "shadow" (skia) refers to "an image cast by an object and representing the form of that object" (Thayer 578). Paul is teaching that the Levitical priests were discharging their duties in the earthly tabernacle as a representation of the "heavenly things" (epouranios) or "the heavenly temple or sanctuary" (Thayer 247). Jesus, on the other hand, never served as High Priest in the "shadow" but in the true tabernacle in heaven.

as Moses was admonished of God when he was about to make the tabernacle: God instructed Moses to build the tabernacle exactly like the pattern shown him on Mount Sinai. This earthly tabernacle was a type of the true heavenly tabernacle; therefore, for Moses to know how to construct it, God caused Moses to have a vision to see the heavenly tabernacle. Paul will give more details of the construction of the tabernacle in chapter nine.

for, See, saith he, that thou make all things according to the pattern shewed to thee in the mount: The apostle is quoting the writings of Moses when he says, "And look that thou make them after their pattern, which was shewed thee in the mount" (Exodus 25:40). The term "pattern" (tupos) means "an example…in conformity to which a thing must be made" (Thayer 632) (compare Acts 7:44 and Exodus 25:40). The pattern "shewed" (deiknuo) Moses was not given as a suggestion but as a command. It signifies "to teach one what he ought to do" (Thayer 126). Just as Noah was given specific instructions about how to build the ark for the salvation of his family, so was Moses given specific instructions about how to build the tabernacle.

But now hath he obtained a more excellent ministry, by how much also he is the mediator of a better covenant, which was established upon better promises.

But now hath he obtained a more excellent ministry: The words "But now" indicates "as the case now stands" (Vincent 470) and refers to the fact that Jesus is now in heaven in contrast to being on the earth. Jesus, now in heaven, has "obtained" (tugchano) or has "become master of" (Thayer 632) a "more excellent" (diaphoros) or "surpassing" (Thayer 143) ministry. The term "ministry" (leitourgia) refers to "the service …of the priests relative to the prayers and sacrifices offered to God" (Thayer 375). Jesus’ sacrifice of Himself far exceeds any of the sacrifices offered by the earthly high priests.

by how much also he is the mediator of a better covenant: Jesus is the "mediator" (mesites), which is "a medium of communication" (Thayer 401) between God and man. Man’s communication with God now is far superior because Jesus is the mediator, not of the Old Covenant but of a new and "better covenant." The adjective "better" (kreitton) means that the covenant is "more excellent" (Thayer 359) than the previous "covenant" (diatheke) (Thayer 136). The fundamental purpose of a covenant is for God and man to form a relationship. Jesus as a High Priest is superior to earthly high priests because His is of a heavenly nature while the earthly priesthood was temporal.

which was established upon better promises: Paul speaks of a "better covenant" that was "established" (nomotheteo) or "sanction(ed) by law" (Thayer 427) upon better "promises" (epaggelia), the promise of forgiveness of sins, something the Old Covenant could not do. Paul will explain the "better promises" in chapter nine; however, he now pauses to deal with the discussion of why Jesus’ New Covenant is superior to the Old.

Verse 4

For if that first covenant had been faultless, then should no place have been sought for the second.

Paul’s argument here is the same as in chapter seven, verse 11, proving that if the first covenant had been "faultless" (amemptos), "free from…defect" (Thayer 31-32), the second would not have been needed. The introduction of a New Covenant implies the insufficiency of the former covenant to accomplish God’s purpose to save man from sin. Paul teaches the Christians in Galatia this same truth about spiritual life coming through Jesus Christ because it could not come through the law:

For if there had been a law given which could have given life, verily righteousness should have been by the law. But the scripture hath concluded all under sin, that the promise by faith of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe (Galatians 3:21-22).

To the Christians in Rome, Paul writes concerning the inferiority of the law and the righteousness coming from Jesus Christ:

Therefore by the deeds of the law there shall no flesh be justified in his sight: for by the law is the knowledge of sin. But now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets; Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe: for there is no difference (Romans 3:20-22).

In his epistle to the churches in Galatia, Paul proves that man’s justification does not come from the law but instead comes from Jesus Christ:

Knowing that a man is not justified by the works of the law, but by the faith of Jesus Christ, even we have believed in Jesus Christ, that we might be justified by the faith of Christ, and not by the works of the law: for by the works of the law shall no flesh be justified (Galatians 2:16).

The law was faulty because it did not lead man to salvation. The fact is, it was not God’s objective for the old law to lead man to salvation; that law did not contain the provision necessary for forgiveness of sins, but the new law did. The actual purpose of the law of Moses was to do what it did: that is, to separate the Jewish nation until the time when the Messiah would be born and offer salvation to lost mankind. In Galatians, Paul writes that the purpose of the law was to bring God’s children to Jesus:

Wherefore then serveth the law? It was added because of transgressions, till the seed should come to whom the promise was made; and it was ordained by angels in the hand of a mediator…Wherefore the law was our schoolmaster to bring us unto Christ, that we might be justified by faith. But after that faith is come, we are no longer under a schoolmaster. For ye are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus (3:19, 24-26).

A second covenant was indispensable because the first could not offer salvation; the second had to displace the first covenant. Once the first covenant accomplished God’s intention, He replaced it.

Verse 8

For finding fault with them, he saith, Behold, the days come, saith the Lord, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of Judah:

For finding fault with them, he saith: The term "fault" (memphomai) means placing "blame" (Thayer 397) on the people or things found fault with in the preceding verse. Many writers disagree about whether the word "them" applies to God’s people who sinned or to the Old Covenant that had to be replaced. Some writers apply the term to both the people and to the Old Covenant. Contextually, however, it seems more probable that Paul is speaking about the "fault" with the covenant and not with people. The people did have faults in that they had continually sinned against God; however, in the immediate context (verse 7), Paul refers to faults of the Old Covenant and immediately says, "finding fault with them…I will make a new covenant."

Behold, the days come, saith the Lord, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and with the house of

Judah: Paul quotes Jeremiah 31:31-34. By "the days come," the writer refers to the time when Jesus will establish a New Covenant. Having found "fault" with the Old Covenant, Paul says the Lord "will make a new (kainos) covenant."

The promise of this New Covenant was made with the "house of Israel and with the house of Judah." The "house" (oikos) refers specifically to all the "descendants" (Thayer 441) of Israel and Judah. The difference between the two, however, is that the "house of Israel" refers to the ten tribes that revolted from the line of David and made Jeroboam their king in 975 B.C. The "house of Judah" refers to the two tribes that followed Rehoboam. The promise of a New Covenant was made with all of God’s children, not just one of the tribes but with every individual. In and through Jesus Christ, all tribes become one. Paul, speaking of different groups of people being united in Christ, says:

For ye are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus. For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus. And if ye be Christ’s, then are ye Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise (Galatians 3:26-29).

Verse 9

Not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers in the day when I took them by the hand to lead them out of the land of Egypt; because they continued not in my covenant, and I regarded them not, saith the Lord.

Not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers in the day when I took them by the hand to lead them out of the land of Egypt: The Mosaic covenant was made by God in the wilderness as Moses was rescuing the children of Israel from Egyptian bondage. The term "day" metaphorically refers to the entire period of time the Israelites were crossing the wilderness. Because of God’s grace, the Israelites were saved from physical slavery. Many miracles were performed: the dividing of the Red Sea so that the Israelites could cross on dry land to free them from captivity, feeding the people with manna from heaven, quenching their thirst by bringing water from rocks as they crossed the desert land, and being led by a cloud by day and fire by night. In spite of all the wondrous miracles, the Israelites did not remain faithful to God. God figuratively held the hands of His children to lead them out of Egypt, but they released His hand (His guidance) by continually committing sin.

because they continued not in my covenant, and I regarded them not, saith the Lord: Because of the Israelites’ constant complaining and their not continuing in His covenant, God "regarded them not" (ameleo), meaning "to neglect" (Thayer 31). When God originally took them by the hand to lead them out of Egypt, He took care of them and provided their needs; however, when they chose to defy His covenant, He turned away from them by not providing for them or their safety.

Verse 10

For this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, saith the Lord; I will put my laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts: and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people:

For this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, saith the Lord: God designed a New Covenant that would lead mankind to Jesus for salvation. It is this covenant that Paul says the Lord will make with the house of Israel. Paul is leading into a description of this New Covenant to explain the reason it is considered new.

I will put my laws into their mind: The term "laws" (nomos) means "a precept or injunction…(It is the) plural of the things prescribed by the divine will" (Thayer 427). God’s laws, Paul says, will be put into their "mind" (dianoia), referring to "the faculty of understanding, feeling, (and) desiring" (Thayer 140). Putting His laws "into their mind" means to open their eyes to enlighten their understanding. It also involves allowing them to see the true spiritual meaning of those laws. With the New Covenant, God’s laws are made available for all men. The Ten Commandments (the Old Covenant) were given only to the children of Israel on two literal tables of stone. Few people actually had access to them. They had to rely on Moses or others to teach them what was written. Moses records:

And the LORD said unto Moses, Hew thee two tables of stone like unto the first: and I will write upon these tables the words that were in the first tables, which thou brakest. And he was there with the LORD forty days and forty nights; he did neither eat bread, nor drink water. And he wrote upon the tables the words of the covenant, the ten commandments. And it came to pass, when Moses came down from mount Sinai with the two tables of testimony in Moses’ hand, when he came down from the mount, that Moses wist not that the skin of his face shone while he talked with him. And when Aaron and all the children of Israel saw Moses, behold, the skin of his face shone; and they were afraid to come nigh him. And Moses called unto them; and Aaron and all the rulers of the congregation returned unto him: and Moses talked with them. And afterward all the children of Israel came nigh: and he gave them in commandment all that the LORD had spoken with him in mount Sinai (Exodus 34:1; Exodus 34:28-32).

and write them in their hearts: The word "write" (epigrapho), means "to fix indelibly upon it, cause to cleave to it and to be always vividly present to it" (Thayer 237). When Paul says that God’s word is written in the hearts of His people, he means people must make the word a part of their understanding and obey it sincerely. "Through the heart, the truth affects the will, and through the will it controls and sanctifies the life, so that all the members of the New Covenant are really ’voluntary offerings,’ according to the promise of God to his Son" (Milligan 297).

and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people: The greatest benefit of the New Covenant is the relationship Christians have with God. Our Creator is the God of all people and every Christian will be His. The term "people" (laos) refers to God’s people as a tribe or a family. It is not a tribe, as the tribe of Israel or the tribe of Judah (see verse 8), all coming from one’s ancestors; instead, Paul is referring to those who accept and obey Jesus as the High Priest of the new sanctuary with new laws. The only way one can find salvation through the New Covenant is by the means of faith and obedience to Jesus Christ, as He says, "He that believeth (faith) and is baptized (obedience) shall be saved; but he that believeth not shall be damned" (Mark 16:16). The consequences of our failure to obey are a fearful thing. Later in this same epistle, Paul speaks of those under the New Covenant who are willfully disobedient:

For if we sin wilfully after that we have received the knowledge of the truth, there remaineth no more sacrifice for sins, But a certain fearful looking for of judgment and fiery indignation, which shall devour the adversaries. He that despised Moses’ law died without mercy under two or three witnesses: Of how much sorer punishment, suppose ye, shall he be thought worthy, who hath trodden under foot the Son of God, and hath counted the blood of the covenant, wherewith he was sanctified, an unholy thing, and hath done despite unto the Spirit of grace? For we know him that hath said, Vengeance belongeth unto me, I will recompense, saith the Lord. And again, The Lord shall judge his people. It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God (10:26-31).

The Old Covenant established a temporary physical relationship between the children of Israel and God; however, the New Covenant establishes a permanent spiritual relationship with God. Thus, the Lord says, "I will put my laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts." No longer will God’s people be promisedthe earthly home in the land of Canaan but a spiritual home in heaven.

Verse 11

And they shall not teach every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for all shall know me, from the least to the greatest.

And they shall not teach every man his neighbor, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: The term "teach" (didasko) is "used of those who enjoin upon others to observe some ordinance, to embrace some opinion, or to obey some precept" (Thayer 144). Paul is referring to the act of one person teaching his neighbor about the Lord. The word "neighbour" (plesion) is not restricted to an individual who lives close by but to "a member of the Hebrew race" (Thayer 519) or a fellow citizen. The word "brother," on the other hand, means a relative.

The second benefit is that everyone has an opportunity to know God. The Hebrews were physically born a child of God; thus, they had to be taught to "Know the Lord," even though they were already in the family of God.

for all shall know me, from the least to the greatest: Paul is not suggesting that Christians will not teach people about the Lord or the Lord’s ways, for they will. He instructs Titus to "speak thou the things which become sound doctrine" (Titus 2:1). Jude writes: "Beloved, when I gave all diligence to write unto you of the common salvation, it was needful for me to write unto you, and exhort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints (Judges 1:3). Jesus instructs the apostles to teach others:

Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen (Matthew 28:19-20).

The meaning of Paul’s words, then, is that in the Christian age, a person learns to "Know the Lord" before obeying Him. When he learns to know God, then he obeys the gospel and becomes a child of God. The superiority of the New Covenant is that everyone in the Christian age has an equal opportunity to know God through Jesus Christ: "Jesus Christ, the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever" (13:8).

Verse 12

For I will be merciful to their unrighteousness, and their sins and their iniquities will I remember no more.

Paul gives a third "better promise" of the New Covenant: the fact that God will be "merciful to their unrighteousness." Under the Old Covenant, sins were not forgiven forever. Sacrifices had to be offered year after year to roll forward man’s sins—but every year all sins were remembered again. The superiority of the New Covenant is that God promises to be "merciful" (hileos), implying that He will be "propitious" (Thayer 301) to sinners. God will be gracious toward sinners’ acts of "unrighteousness" (adikia), which involves "a deed violating law and justice (or) misdeeds" (Thayer 12). Rather than remembering the sins of the people every year, He will remember "their sins and iniquities…no more." The word "sins" (hamartia) involves doing more than what God instructs, and the term "iniquities" (anomia) implies a "disregard for law" (Thayer 48), suggesting that one is not obeying what God instructs. Under the New Covenant, when one’s sins are forgiven by repentance and baptism (Acts 2:38), it is as though the child of God has never sinned—his life begins anew. He never will have to give account for those past sins again.

Verse 13

In that he saith, A new covenant, he hath made the first old. Now that which decayeth and waxeth old is ready to vanish away.

In that he saith, A new covenant, he hath made the first old: The key words of this verse are "new" and "old." The words "hath made old" (palaioo) means the Old Covenant is "worn out" (Thayer 474) and is replaced by the New. Kendrick says that making the first "old" implies it has become "antiquated" (104) and is on the verge of extinction. The New Covenant is designed to do what the old could not do:

For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh: That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit (Romans 8:3-4).

Now that which decayeth and waxeth old is ready to vanish away: The word translated "decayeth" is the same Greek term translated "hath made old," meaning worn out. Paul emphasizes the state of the Old Covenant’s being not only old but, in fact, "ready to vanish away." The Old Covenant was ready to vanish away when Jesus died on the cross. In writing to the faithful Christians at Colosse, Paul says of the Old Covenant, "Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross" (Colossians 2:14). When Jesus took away the Old Covenant, it essentially "vanished away" (aphanismos), referring to its "disappearance" (Thayer 88). When the Old Covenant vanished, so did the tabernacle and all of its services; and the earthly high priests ceased to exist as a religious office.

Bibliographical Information
Editor Charles Baily, "Commentary on Hebrews 8". "Contending for the Faith". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/ctf/hebrews-8.html. 1993-2022.
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