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Bible Commentaries

John Dummelow's Commentary on the Bible

Psalms 94

Verses 1-23

This is a national Ps., written at a time when Israel was oppressed by foreign enemies. It may be connected either with the days of the exile or with some later period of national distress. The opening vv. appeal to God to show Himself as judge of the earth (Psalms 94:1-2). The misdeeds of the oppressors are next described (Psalms 94:3-7), and a rebuke is addressed to certain Israelites who were tempted to give up their faith in God (Psalms 94:8-11). The next vv. speak of the blessings of adversity (Psalms 94:12-13), and the certainty that God will not forsake His people (Psalms 94:14-15). The Psalmist has found in God his only refuge and comfort (Psalms 94:16-19), and concludes his Ps. with the conviction that He will overthrow the wicked (Psalms 94:20-23).

1. Shew thyself] RV ’Shine forth.’

2. A reward] RV ’their desert.’

4. How long, etc.] RV ’They prate, they speak arrogantly,’ etc. The v. is a statement, not a question.

7. The oppressors not only injure Israel, but despise Israel’s God.

8. Understand] RV ’consider.’ Brutish.. fools] These words refer to Israelites who are tempted to adopt the heathen point of view.

9. 10. These vv. form an argument for the knowledge and effectual government of God.

10. Heathen] RV ’nations.’ Shall not he know?] These words are supplied to complete the sense. The Psalmist breaks off bis argument abruptly.

11. This v. is quoted with some modification in 1 Corinthians 3:20.

14. The first clause is quoted in Romans 11:2.

15. Return unto righteousness] shall again be just.

17. Almost] RV ’soon.’ Silence] the grave, or Sheol.

Verses 1-23

This is a national Ps., written at a time when Israel was oppressed by foreign enemies. It may be connected either with the days of the exile or with some later period of national distress. The opening vv. appeal to God to show Himself as judge of the earth (Psalms 94:1-2). The misdeeds of the oppressors are next described (Psalms 94:3-7), and a rebuke is addressed to certain Israelites who were tempted to give up their faith in God (Psalms 94:8-11). The next vv. speak of the blessings of adversity (Psalms 94:12-13), and the certainty that God will not forsake His people (Psalms 94:14-15). The Psalmist has found in God his only refuge and comfort (Psalms 94:16-19), and concludes his Ps. with the conviction that He will overthrow the wicked (Psalms 94:20-23).

1. Shew thyself] RV ’Shine forth.’

2. A reward] RV ’their desert.’

4. How long, etc.] RV ’They prate, they speak arrogantly,’ etc. The v. is a statement, not a question.

7. The oppressors not only injure Israel, but despise Israel’s God.

8. Understand] RV ’consider.’ Brutish.. fools] These words refer to Israelites who are tempted to adopt the heathen point of view.

9. 10. These vv. form an argument for the knowledge and effectual government of God.

10. Heathen] RV ’nations.’ Shall not he know?] These words are supplied to complete the sense. The Psalmist breaks off bis argument abruptly.

11. This v. is quoted with some modification in 1 Corinthians 3:20.

14. The first clause is quoted in Romans 11:2.

15. Return unto righteousness] shall again be just.

17. Almost] RV ’soon.’ Silence] the grave, or Sheol.

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Bibliographical Information
Dummelow, John. "Commentary on Psalms 94". "John Dummelow's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/eng/dcb/psalms-94.html. 1909.