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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Corinthians 10:24

Let no one seek his own good, but that of his neighbor.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Let no man seek his own, etc. - Let none, for his private gratification or emolument, disturb the peace or injure the soul of another. Let every man live, not for himself, but for every part of the great human family with which he is surrounded.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Let no man seek his own - This should be properly interpreted of the matter under discussion, though the direction assumes the form of a general principle. Originally it meant, “Let no man, in regard to the question about partaking of the meat offered in sacrifice to idols, consult his own pleasure, happiness, or convenience; but let him, as the leading rule on the subject, ask what will be for the welfare of others. Let him not gratify his own taste and inclinations, regardless of their feelings, comfort, and salvation; but let him in these things have a primary reference to their welfare.” He may dispense with these things without danger or injury; He cannot indulge in them without endangering the happiness or purity of others. His duty therefore requires him to abstain. The injunction, however, has a general form, and is applicable to all Christians, and to all cases “of a similar kind.” It does not mean that a man is not in any instance to regard his own welfare, happiness, or salvation; it does not mean that a man owes no duty to himself or family; or that he should neglect all these to advance the welfare of others; but the precept means, that “in cases like that under consideration,” when there is no positive law, and when a man‘s example would have a great influence, he should be guided in his conduct, not by a reference to his own ease, comfort or gratification, but by a reference to the purity and salvation of others. And the observance of this simple rule would make a prodigious change in the church and the world.

But every man another‘s wealth - The word “wealth” is not in the Greek. Literally, “that which is of another;” the word τὸ toreferring to anything and everything that pertains to his comfort, usefulness, happiness, or salvation - The sentiment of the whole is, “when a man is bound and directed by no positive law, his grand rule should be the comfort and salvation of others.” This is a simple rule; it might be easily applied; and this would be a sort of balance-wheel in the various actions and plans of the world. If every man would adopt this rule, he could not be in much danger of going wrong; he would be certain that he would not live in vain.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-corinthians-10.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

Let no man seek his own, but each his neighbor's good.

This does not forbid conduct which is in keeping with enlightened self-interest, but requires that every action shall also be weighed in the light of its effect upon one's fellow Christians. The purely selfish person is by definition non-Christian.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/1-corinthians-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Let no man seek his own,.... His carnal pleasure and private advantage in eating things sacrificed to "idols", to the hurt and disadvantage of his brethren; otherwise it is lawful for a man to seek his own good, temporal, spiritual, and eternal, to seek for the necessaries of life, his spiritual peace and comfort, and his everlasting welfare and happiness; but then he should not only seek his own,

but every man another's wealth, or "that which is another's"; for the word "wealth" is not in the original text. The apostle's meaning is, that a man, in the use of things indifferent, should not seek the gratifying of his sensual appetite or other passions, what may be pleasing or profitable to himself; but should consult the profit and edification of others.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-corinthians-10.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

(1 Corinthians 10:33; 1 Corinthians 13:5; Romans 15:1, Romans 15:2).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-corinthians-10.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Let no man seek his own (μηδεις το εαυτου ζητειτωmēdeis to heautou zēteitō). This is Paul‘s rule for social relations (1 Corinthians 13:5; Galatians 6:2; Romans 14:7; Romans 15:2; Philemon 2:1.) and is the way to do what is expedient and what builds up.

His neighbour‘s good (το του ετερουto tou heterou). Literally, “the affair of the other man.” Cf. τον ετερονton heteron in Romans 13:8 for this idea of ετεροςheteros like ο πλησιονho plēsion (the nigh man, the neighbour) in Romans 15:2. This is loving your neighbour as yourself by preferring your neighbour‘s welfare to your own (Philemon 2:4).


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/1-corinthians-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Another's wealth ( τὸ τοῦ ἑτέρου )

Lit., that which is the other's. Wealth, inserted by A.V. is used in the older English sense of well-being. See on Acts 19:25. The A.V. also ignores the force of the article, the other. Rev., much better, his neighbor's good.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/1-corinthians-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Let no man seek his own, but every man another's wealth.

His own only, but another's welfare also.


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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-corinthians-10.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

24.Let no one seek his own. He handles the same subject in the 14th Chapter of the Romans. Let no one please himself, but endeavor to please his brethren for their edification This is a precept that is very necessary, for we are so corrupted by nature, that every one consults his own interests, regardless of those of his brethren. Now, as the law of love calls upon us to love our neighbors as ourselves, (Matthew 22:39,) so it requires us to consult their welfare. The Apostle, however, does not expressly forbid individuals to consult their own advantage, but he requires that they should not be so devoted to their own interests, as not to be prepared to forego part of their right, as often as the welfare of their brethren requires this.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/1-corinthians-10.html. 1840-57.

Vv. 24. "Let no man seek his own, but each his neighbour"s good."

It is the idea of οἰκοδομεῖν, edifying, which rules in this verse. It is not necessary to understand the adverb μόνον: "Let no man seek only..." The exclusion is absolute, because it condemns every pursuit of self-interest which is inspired by egoism: "Let no man seek his own enjoyment or advantage; but let him in his conduct always take account of the interest of others."

In the application of this rule to the particular subject with which Paul is dealing, two cases might present themselves to the Christian: that of a meal in his own house (1 Corinthians 10:25-26), or that of a meal in a strange house (1 Corinthians 10:27-30).


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Bibliography
Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/1-corinthians-10.html.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

24 Let no man seek his own, but every man another’s wealth.

Ver. 24. Let no man seek his own] Self miscarries us all, and makes us eccentric in our motions, nothing more.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 Corinthians 10:24. Let no man seek his own This precept cannot be taken in a strict and literal sense, but should be interpreted comparatively, so as to understand the Apostle as exhorting them not to seek their own advantage entirely, or not so much as that of others. Mr. Locke's paraphrase is, "No one must seek barely his own private particular interest alone, but let every one seek the good of others also."


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

These words may be understood two ways:

1. Let no man seek his own, that is, only his own wealth.

2. Let no man seek his own wealth: that is, to the prejudice of others, though never so much to his own advantage;

teaching us, that it is the duty of every Christian not merely to look at his own profit and pleasure, but at the benefit and advantage of others, as that which edifies, or tends to promote holiness in others; and that in the use of our Christian liberty we must regard rather the edification and salvation of others, than the gratification of ourselves.


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Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

24.] Further following out of οἰκοδομεῖ. This ought to be our object: the bringing on one another to perfection, not the pleasing ourselves, see Romans 15:2-3. In the second clause, ἕκαστος must be supplied from μηδείς (hence it has found its way into the rec.): so Plato, Rep. ii. p. 366 D, οὐδεὶς ἑκὼν δίκαιος, ἀλλʼ … ψέγει τὸ ἄδικον,—i.e. ἕκαστος ψέγει. See Bernhardy, Syntax, p. 458.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/1-corinthians-10.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

1 Corinthians 10:24. Let no one be striving to satisfy his own interest, but, etc. Comp 1 Corinthians 10:33. We must not impair the ideal, to which this rule gives absolute expression (otherwise in Philippians 2:4), by supplying μόνον and καί, as Grotius and others do. See rather Romans 15:1 f. Even the limitation to the question in hand about sacrificial feasts (Pott), or to the adiaphora in general (Billroth, de Wette, Osiander), is unwarranted; for the special duty of the οἰκοδομεῖν is included under this quite general rule, the application of which to the matter in dispute is not to come till afterwards.

After ἀλλά we are mentally to supply ἕκαστος from the preceding μηδείς. See Bernhardy, p. 458; Stallbaum, a(1700) Plat. Symp. p. 192 E, Rep. p. 366 C Buttmann, neut. Gr. p. 336 [E. T. 392].


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1832.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

It is the duty of every one who is a disciple of Christ, not merely to look at his own pleasure or profit, but the profit and advantage of others.

Charity seeketh not her own, ( saith the apostle, 1 Corinthians 13:5), that is, it seeketh not its own with the prejudice of another. So as admit that in this practice there were nothing looked like idolatry and impiety towards God, yet charity or love to your brethren ought to deter you.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

His own; his own pleasure or profit merely.

Another’s; benefit, as well as his own.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/1-corinthians-10.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

24. τὸ τοῦ ἑτέρου. The benefit of other people. Cf. Romans 15:1-3; Philippians 2:4. The conclusion is moral, not positive. No rule is laid down about eating or not eating any kind of food as a matter of importance in itself. With such things the Gospel has no concern. What St Paul does prescribe, relates to the effect of our conduct upon others. See Romans 14 throughout. It will thus happen in our case, as in that of the Apostle, that what may be quite wrong under one set of circumstances may be quite right in another, as in Galatians 2:3, and Acts 16:1. See also notes on ch. 8. It may be interesting to remark how these questions were treated by the theologians of later times. Estius gives several examples of the casuistry of the Latin Fathers. Augustine decides the case of those who, pressed by hunger, might be tempted to eat of food in an idol temple when quite alone, by saying that if they know it to have been offered to idols, they must refuse it. Jerome decides that the invocation of idols and daemons makes such food unclean. Gregory commends the virtue of some unlettered Christians who preferred rather to be slain than to eat meats offered to idols which their Lombard captors endeavoured to force upon them. The Greek Father, Chrysostom, however, remarks that St Paul does not suffer the Christian to question what it is he buys, but simply to eat whatever comes from the market. Compare for the moral sentiment Marcus Aurelius IV. 3 ὅτι τὰ λογικὰ ζῷα ἀλλήλων ἕνεκεν γέγονε, and IV. 12 πρὸς τὸ πρᾶξαι μόνον ὅπερ ἂν ὁ τῆς βασιλικῆς καὶ νομοθετικῆς λόγος ὑποβάλλῃ, ἐπ' ὠφελείᾳ ἀνθρώπων. And Cicero de Finibus II. 14 ‘Ut profectus a caritate domesticorum ac suorum, serpat longius et se implicet primum civium, deinde omnium mortalium societate, atque ut ad Archytam scripsit Plato non sibi se soli natum meminerit, sed patriae, sed suis, ut perexigua pars ipsi relinquatur.’


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Bibliography
"Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/1-corinthians-10.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

24. His own—Advantage or gratification.

Another’s—Regulating your practice, not solely by your own convenience, but for another’s spiritual safety. And he proceeds now to specify how this is to be done.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-corinthians-10.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

'Let no man seek his own, but each his neighbour's good.'

A much better catch phrase, suggests Paul, is, 'let no man seek his own but each his neighbour's'. In other words a man should not be always thinking of himself and his own freedom and his rights to this or that, but should be thinking of what is good for his neighbour (compare Romans 15:2). And this they were failing to do.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/1-corinthians-10.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The well-being of one"s neighbor is of primary importance. The exercise of all one"s liberties is of secondary importance (cf. Romans 15:2; Philippians 2:4). The Corinthians viewed their freedom as an opportunity to pursue their own interests. Paul viewed it as an opportunity to benefit and build up another person.


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/1-corinthians-10.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

1 Corinthians 10:24. Let no man seek his own, but each his neighbour’s goodGr. ‘his neighbour’s things,’ meaning his benefit, in the widest sense. As this is God’s own design in all His works, but pre-eminently in redemption, so it is the grand law of the Christian life, and the chiefest ornament of the Christian character. Now for the application.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/1-corinthians-10.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

1 Corinthians 10:24. With μηδεὶς τ. ἑαυτοῦ κ. τ. λ. cf. 1 Corinthians 13:5, Romans 14:7; Romans 15:2, Galatians 6:2, Philippians 2:1 ff. After ἀλλὰ understand ἕκαστος, from the previous μηδείς: cf. the ellipsis in 1 Corinthians 3:1; 1 Corinthians 3:7, 1 Corinthians 7:19 (Bm(1544), p. 392). For ἕτερος (= πλησίον, Romans 15:2), wider than ἀδελφός (1 Corinthians 8:11; cf. 1Co 8:27 f.)—“the other” in contrast with oneself—see parls.; Gr(1545) idiom prefers “the other” where we say “others“.— τὸ ἑαυτοῦ, τὸ τοῦ ἑτέρου implies some definite good—“his own, the other’s interest”: a N.T. h. l.; the pl(1546) elsewhere in such connexion (cf. Matthew 22:21).


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/1-corinthians-10.html. 1897-1910.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

1 Corinthians 10:24 Let no man seek his own, but {each} his neighbor"s {good}.

"his neighbor"s good"- Romans 15:1-3; 1 Corinthians 13:5; Galatians 6:2; Philippians 2:1-4. "No one should always be looking after his own welfare" (Wms).

And my "neighbor"s good" is defined as that which "edifies" him spiritually. ()

Point to Note:

"Hence "freedom" does not mean "to seek my own good"; it means to be free in Christ in such a way that one can truly seek to benefit and build up another person." (Fee p. 479)

To the Corinthians "knowledge and rights" had lead to pride.. a non-Christian bottom line that says, "freedom to do as I please when I please." In contrast, the Christian bottom line is "the spiritual benefit of others."


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Bibliography
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/1-corinthians-10.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

no man = no one. Greek. medeis.

his own = his own things.

every man = each one, but the texts omit.

another"s wealth = the things of the other. (Greek. heteros. App-124.) Compare Philippians 1:2, Philippians 1:4.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-corinthians-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Let no man seek his own, but every man another's wealth.

(1 Corinthians 10:33; Romans 15:1-2; 1 Corinthians 13:5.)


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-corinthians-10.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

But for the interests of others. Selfishness will destroy us; unselfishness will make us strong! Compare 1 Corinthians 13:5; Romans 14:7; Romans 15:2; Galatians 6:2; Philippians 2:1-4.


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/1-corinthians-10.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(24) But every man another’s wealth.—Better, but each one another’s good. The English word “wealth” has, in process of time, come to bear a limited significance, such as did not originally belong to it. By “wealth” we now mean temporal possessions or advantage; it originally meant “good,” including more especially “moral welfare,” as in the collect for the Queen in the Prayer Book, “Grant her in health and wealth long to live.”


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-corinthians-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Let no man seek his own, but every man another's wealth.
seek
33; 9:19-23; 13:5; Philippians 2:4,5,21

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-corinthians-10.html.

Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

Let no man seek his own, but every man another's (wealth).

That is, let every man, in the use of his liberty, have regard to the welfare of others. The maxim is indeed general. It is not only in the use of things indifferent, but in all other things we should act, not, in exclusive regard to our own interests, but also with a view to the good of others. Self, in other words, is not to be the object of our actions. The context, however, shows, that the apostle intended the maxim to be applied to the subject under discussion. Another's wealth, i.e. another's weal or welfare, according to the old meaning of the word wealth.


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Bibliography
Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10:24". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/1-corinthians-10.html.

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