Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 10:18

Moreover, the king made a great throne of ivory and overlaid it with refined gold.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Ivory;   King;   Solomon;   Throne;   Thompson Chain Reference - Ivory;   Nation, the;   Thrones;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Gold;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ivory;   Sabeans;   Throne;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - King;   Solomon;   Throne;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Israel;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Ivory;   Solomon;   Throne;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Commerce;   Ivory;   Mizpah;   Phoenice;   Solomon;   Holman Bible Dictionary - House of the Forest of Lebanon;   Ivory;   Palace;   Uphaz;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Government;   Israel;   Ivory;   Sheba, Queen of;   Solomon;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ivory;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Hiram;   Tyre;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Ivory;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Gold;   Ivory;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Best;   Forest;   Gold;   Ivory;   King;   Solomon;   Temple;   Throne;   Tower of Ivory;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - King;   Metals;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

It is, on the whole, probable that the substance of the throne was wood, and that the ivory, cut into thin slabs, and probably carved in patterns, was applied externally as a veneer. This is found to have been the practice in Assyria. The gold was probably not placed over the ivory, but covered other parts of the throne.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Kings 10:18". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-kings-10.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Moreover, the king made a great throne of ivory,.... To sit on and judge his people; and ivory being white, may denote the purity, justice, and equity with which he judged; the white throne in Revelation 20:11 may be an allusion to this; the ivory he had from Tarshish, 1 Kings 10:22.

and overlaid it with the best gold; for the greater splendour and majesty of it; not that he covered it all over, for then the ivory would not be seen, but interlined it, or studded it with it, whereby it appeared the more beautiful and magnificent. Such a throne of gold and ivory was decreed to Caesar by the RomansF16Appian. Alex. l. 2. .

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 10:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-10.html. 1999.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 10:18 Moreover the king made a great throne of ivory, and overlaid it with the best gold.

Ver. 18. Moreover the king made a great throne.] Which stood, likely, in the porch of judgment. [1 Kings 7:7]

And overlaid it with the best gold.] To show, saith Martyr, the incorruption that should be in kings, who should administer justice justice, - Moses’ expression, - that is, pure justice.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 10:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 Kings 10:18. The king made a great throne of ivory The porch in which this throne was placed is mentioned, chap. 1 Kings 7:7 and it was by far the most magnificent of all the rest, inasmuch as it was both the king's seat of judgment and the public audience, where he shewed himself either to the nobles, or to the strangers who resorted to him. It was placed in the midst of rich pillars of cedar, curiously carved and covered, or rather inlaid, with gold: the throne itself, which was in the fashion of a niche, was covered with ivory, inlaid and intermixed with curious ornaments in gold: the ascent to it was by six steps, each step being supported on either side by a small lion, and the arms of the seat with two others as large as the life. All these, and even the steps themselves, were covered with ivory and gold. We never read of ivory till about Solomon's time; who, perhaps, brought elephants out of India, or, at least, took care to have a great deal of ivory imported from thence; for in after ages we read of ivory beds and ivory palaces: at this time, however, it was nearly as precious as gold. The text says, the like to this throne was not made in any kingdom, (1 Kings 10:20.) 1:e. in those days; for we read in afterages, that the throne of the Parthian kings was of gold, encompassed with four golden pillars, adorned with precious stones; and that the Persian kings sat in judgment under a golden vine, and other trees of gold, the bunches of whole grapes and other fruits were made of several sorts of precious stones.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Kings 10:18". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-kings-10.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Overlaid it; not wholly, but in part, here and there, which made it more beautiful to the eye. Probably the main substance of it was ivory, but some cavities were left in it which were filled with gold.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 10:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-10.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

18.Throne of ivory — Like Ahab’s ivory house, (1 Kings 22:39,) and the ivory palaces and beds mentioned Psalms 45:8, Amos 6:4, this throne was not made entirely of ivory, but was so set with ivory, and so much of this material was used in its construction, that it naturally received this name. Ivory was an important article of ancient commerce, as Assyrian monuments show.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 10:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-10.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Ivory. Hebrew, "of the tooth" (or horn) of elephants: people do not agree of which the ivory is formed. See Pliny ([Natural History?] viii. 3.) for the former sentiment, and for the latter, Varro vi. Ezechiel (xxvii. 15.) seems to unite both sentiments, calling it, "horns of the tooth." (Haydock) --- Ivory may, in effect, be wrought like horn. --- Finest. Hebrew, "gold of Uphas." This was the country whence it was brought; (Jeremias x. 9.) probably Colchis, where the river Phasis, or Phison, flows, Genesis ii. 11. (Calmet) --- The Chaldean calls Uphas, (in Jeremias) Ophir; and Huet supposes that Paz and Parvaim designate the same place, chap. ix. 28., and Job xxviii. 17. (Du Hamel) --- In Paralipomenon, we only read, pure gold, which would suffer the ivory to appear in some places. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 10:18". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-10.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the best = pure.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Kings 10:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-kings-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Moreover the king made a great throne of ivory, and overlaid it with the best gold.

A great throne of ivory. It seems to have been made, not of solid ivory, but veneered. It was in the form of an arm-chair with a carved back. The ascent to it was by six steps, on each of which stood lions, in place of a railing; while a lion, probably of gilt metal, stood at each side, which, we may suppose from the analogy of other Oriental thrones, supported a canopy (Sir Thomas Roe's 'Voyages,' p. 456, where he gives an account of the throne of the, great Mogul, bearing a resemblance to Solomon's magnificent seat of majesty, but much inferior: see also Rawlinson's Herodotus,' 2:, p. 178, note, p. 179). A golden footstool is mentioned (2 Chronicles 11:18) as attached to this throne, whose magnificence is described as unrivaled.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 10:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-kings-10.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(18) Ivory.—This seems to have been brought in by the Tyrians (1 Kings 10:22), and it may be noted that the only other notice of ivory in the history is in the “ivory house” of Ahab (1 Kings 22:39), who was allied with Tyre. In Psalms 45:8 (presumably of the age of Solomon) we find mention of “ivory palaces,” or possibly “caskets.” The Tyrians are described in Ezekiel 27:15 as receiving it through Dedan in Arabia, whither, no doubt, it came from India. But the Egyptians used ivory largely, drawing it from Africa; and there was, in later times, a port on the Red Sea which was a mart for ivory. The Tyrians may, therefore, have imported it both from India and from Africa. The throne of Solomon was probably inlaid with ivory and gold. Traces of such inlaying are found in Assyrian and Egyptian monuments. It is probable that, like his other architectural and decorative work, it was executed by Tyrian workmen, and the detailed description of it shows how greatly it impressed the imagination of Israel. The lion was the emblem of the house of Judah; the number twelve corresponded to the twelve tribes; and the exaltation of the throne—specially remarkable in a country where men sat commonly on the ground or on cushions—was the emblem of majesty. In the Dictionary of the Bible (“THRONE”) is given a sketch of an Assyrian throne, from a Nineveh bas-relief, which has horses in the position, supporting “the stays,” or arms of the throne, here ascribed to the lions.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 10:18". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-kings-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Moreover the king made a great throne of ivory, and overlaid it with the best gold.
a great throne
2 Chronicles 9:17-19; Psalms 45:6; 110:1; 122:5; Hebrews 1:3,8; Revelation 20:11
ivory
22; 22:39; Psalms 45:8; Ezekiel 27:6; Amos 6:4; Revelation 18:12
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 7:7 - for the throne;  Esther 5:1 - sat;  Song of Solomon 7:4 - ivory

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 10:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-10.html.