Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 14:12

Now you, arise, go to your house. When your feet enter the city the child will die.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Abijah;   Government;   Jeroboam;   Judgments;   Prophecy;   Thompson Chain Reference - Death;   Deaths Foretold;   Prophesying;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Abijah;   Ahijah;   Baasha;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ahijah;   Jeroboam;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Ahijah;   Jehu;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Abijah;   Ahijah;   Burial;   Temple of Jerusalem;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abijah;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Abijah ;   Ahijah ;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Ahi'ah;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jeroboam;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Abijah;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Ahijah (the Prophet);  

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Arise thou therefore, get thee to thine own house,.... With all haste, as soon as she could:

and when thy feet enter the city; the city of Tirzah, very probably the king's palace stood at the entry of it, see 1 Kings 14:17,

the child shall die; this is an answer to the question she was to ask, and at the same time a token of the sure and certain fulfilment of all the prophet had spoken in the name of the Lord.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:12". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-14.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

the child shall die — The death and general lamentation felt through the country at the loss of the prince were also predicted. The reason for the profound regret shown at his death arose, according to Jewish writers, from his being decidedly opposed to the erection of the golden calves, and using his influence with his father to allow his subjects the free privilege of going to worship in Jerusalem.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-kings-14.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Arise thou therefore, get thee to thine own house: and when thy feet enter into the city, the child shall die.

When, … — Presently upon thy entrance into the city; when thou art gone but a little way in it, even as far as to the threshold of the king's door, verse17, which possibly was near the gates of the city. And by this judge of the truth of the rest of my prophecy.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:12". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-kings-14.html. 1765.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE CHILD THAT WAS TOO GOOD TO LIVE

‘The child shall die.’

1 Kings 14:12

Jeroboam has filled up the measure of his iniquity, and among the things that he has to suffer this is one of the greatest—that his child is to die. And this announcement is made to the one who can least bear it—to the mother; the one who is ready to do anything and play any false part so that she may save her son.

What was to happen? Ahijah is explicit. After repeating the story of Jeroboam’s iniquity he adds: ‘Arise thou, therefore, get thee to thine own house: and when thy feet enter into the city, the child shall die. And all Israel shall mourn for him and bury him: for he only of Jeroboam shall come to the grave’—every one else will be slaughtered—‘because in him there is found some good thing toward the Lord God of Israel in the house of Jeroboam.’

I. Here we have a striking instance of a child daring to be an exception.—There are children that are brought up in pious homes whose subsequent career is exceedingly sad. There are others who have been brought up in ungodly homes who have been marvellously preserved and sustained. They have breathed impure atmospheres, morally and spiritually, from their earliest days, and yet from their very childhood it seems that they have been pure, noble, and self-denying. We have such an instance here: ‘There is found some good thing in him toward the Lord God of Israel in the house of Jeroboam.’ So much grander an attainment to have any good thing left in him with such a father as Jeroboam. Thank God, a child’s possibilities, though his surroundings may be infinitely sad and infinitely depressing, in God’s wise Providence are not always conditioned by the circumstances of home. Oh! the house of Jeroboam is not a veritable hell yet. There is an element of heaven there. It is not a house of total darkness yet. There is a gleam of light in that little child’s face that marks him out as an exception.

II. But observe, the house of Jeroboam in this case is not permitted to keep that lad.—That is one of the penalties of inquity when it has filled up its measure that the talent that is left is taken away; that the good that remains is put out. The house of Jeroboam was not good enough for that child to remain in it, though he had been born in it. He shall die. How often it is that the best die out of a family in life as well as in stories. It is one of the mysteries of Providence that the best should be taken away. The child of Jeroboam died while Jeroboam lived on. But by death that child was saved from evil days. Death was a great reward to him. To have remained in the house of Jeroboam, and to have shared the calamities which were to befall the nation as the result of Jeroboam’s sin, would have been a terrible experience for that child; therefore God took him out of the way. ‘The child shall die.’ He took him aside so that he should witness none of these things. Oh! there is mercy sometimes in taking a child away from evil surroundings. Death is far sweeter than some lives, and in such a case the child is taken away from temptation which might have been overpowering. Thus this is a striking instance of a home which has forfeited the privilege of keeping a choice and pure spirit. The family of Jeroboam must cease. It shall not be honoured by such a life as this. It shall not find a respite in godly descendants. It is a sad thing for any community or nation when, as the result of its sinfulness or its iniquity, it is deprived of its most promising youth.

Thank God, one of the hopes of England is in the rising race! One shudders when we are untrue to our privileges lest the penalty of Jeroboam befall us—that we shall not be privileged to rear up a far grander race than we have been.

Illustrations

(1) ‘She looked at the lovely Tirzah, she saw the city-gate. She looked again: the city was the New Jerusalem, the gate was a Gate of Pearl. Thus far, and thus far only, may the mother accompany the child on the journey on which he too had set out. The tones of her husband’s voice recall her to consciousness.’

(2) ‘He told me, sad at heart, my lord, the king,

How when I reached the city’s gates again,

There came a breath and blew in on his cheeks—

For it had thundered, as I dreamt, and rained,

And all the lattice was refreshed with rain—

And he had turned toward it … smiled … and slept—

And as I entered still he slept … and smiled.’

(3) ‘Jeroboam in sending to Ahijah, though he has faith in his knowledge of Ahijah, that he would predict the right thing, yet played the fool. He thought that Ahijah, who could see the future, would not know who it is that goes to him. There is always a weak point in the armour of the godless man. The criminal plays the fool somewhere; a murderer is sure to be out with it, however clever he has been in the plan of the murder; and sin persisted in is sure to betray a man sooner or later. Just think of it; a man of Jeroboam’s keen insight, and masterly mind, was such a poor fool as to think that Ahijah, who could tell him all about his boy, whether he would live or die, would be imposed upon by a poor woman’s dress and head-gear, even though “his eyes were set by reason of his age.” Thus Jeroboam betrays the trickster even when better memories come back to him. It is the old diplomatist that we have here; and that is one of the dangers of State, that a man may become a diplomatist, and only a diplomatist. There is a diplomatic reserve, or a hiding of personality, here inconsistent with honesty.’

(4) ‘The Angel of the Lord stood by,—

Watching, methought, to see what I would think

Of this his blessed Home. He took my hand

And pointed to the city,—“Beautiful

For situation, joy of all the earth,

Is God’s fair Zion! Thou shalt rise and come

(Even with joy) within this dreaded gate

Of Tirzah; for what time thy weary feet

Do pass across this city-gate, the child

Shall cross that threshold, and behold the face

Of God in peace.”’

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:12". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/1-kings-14.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 14:12 Arise thou therefore, get thee to thine own house: [and] when thy feet enter into the city, the child shall die.

Ver. 12. The child shall die.] This heavy news could not but pierce through the mother’s soul as a sword. [Luke 2:35] A child he is called, because dearly beloved of his parents; but he was of age enough to choose the good and refuse the evil. [1 Kings 14:13]

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:12". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-14.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

1 Kings 14:12

I. Whose child shall die? King Jeroboam's child, the beloved son of a king, most likely the heir to the throne. There was another king—the one who has been called the king of terrors. All the crowned heads in the world bow before him. And the prince was to become the subject of King Death. He was the child of a very bad man. Jeroboam was a teacher of sin, yet he had a very good child.

II. Why was the child to die? To punish his ungodly father. God had given Jeroboam the chance of being a very great man, but he made Israel to sin, and for that God determined to punish him. It is likely that this wicked man was very fond of his children, for when God means to punish, He can strike us on the most tender place.

III. When did the child die? The prophet told the poor mother that the boy would die just as she reached home. She returned to the palace with her heart heavy and sad, for she felt, "I am killing him in my haste to see him. He will die before I reach home."

IV. Life may be a worse thing than death. All Israel mourned for Abijah. It was not to be so with the other children of Jeroboam. They were to be so hated and despised on account of their great wickedness, that men would rejoice when they were dead and out of the way. Abijah was the best off, for though he died so early, it was better to die and be buried quietly than to live to be hated in life and loathed in death.

Serve the Lord God of Abijah; then, whether we live to be old or die in the springtime of life, all shall be well.

T. Champness, Little Foxes that Spoil the Vines, p. 95.


Reference: 1 Kings 14:12-27.—Homiletic Quarterly, vol. iv., p. 352.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:12". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/1-kings-14.html.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Presently upon thy entrance into the city; when thou art gone but a little way in it, even as far as to the threshold of the king’s door, 1 Kings 14:17, which possibly was near the gates of the city. And by the event of this branch judge of the truth of the rest of my prophecy.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:12". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-14.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

12.When thy feet enter — “Her first impulse must have been to fly home to receive his dying kiss; but her second to linger, as if to protract that dear life which must close the moment she entered the city.” — Kitto.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:12". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-14.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

1 Kings 14:12. When thy feet enter into the city — Or, rather, when thy feet have entered: that is, presently upon thy entrance into the city; when thou art gone but a little way in it, even as far as the threshold of the king’s door, (1 Kings 14:17,) the child shall die — And by this judge of the truth of the rest of my prophecy.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:12". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/1-kings-14.html. 1857.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Arise thou therefore, get thee to thine own house: and when thy feet enter into the city, the child shall die.

The child shall die. The death and general lamentation felt throughout the country at the loss of the prince were also predicted. The reason of the profound regret shown at his death arose, according to Jewish writers, from his being decidedly opposed to the erection of the golden calves, and using his influence with his father to allow his subjects the free privilege of going to worship in Jerusalem.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-kings-14.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Arise thou therefore, get thee to thine own house: and when thy feet enter into the city, the child shall die.
when thy feet
3,16,17; 2 Kings 1:6,16; John 4:50-52
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 2:34 - a sign;  1 Kings 15:25 - Nadab;  2 Kings 1:4 - but shalt;  Hebrews 11:38 - whom

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:12". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-14.html.