Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 3:36

Now all the people took note of it, and it pleased them, just as everything the king did pleased all the people.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Abner;   Citizens;   Loyalty;   Popularity;   Tact;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joab;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Funeral;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - King;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abner;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - David;   Dwelling;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Take;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Abner;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

The people took notice - They saw that the king's grief was sincere, and that he had no part nor device in the murder of Abner: see 2 Samuel 3:37.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:36". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-3.html. 1832.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Samuel 3:36

Whatsoever the king did pleased all the people.

“The king can do no wrong”

I. First, then, wherever it is the case that whatsoever the king doeth pleases all the people, this is the outflow of love; and as it is the case with our King, that whatsoever He does pleases all His people, we can truly say that this is the outflow of our love to Him.

1. True love banishes suspicion. No dark suspicions come across the soul that is once enamoured of the Lord Jesus Christ.

2. It also inspires implicit confidence. We are willing to let His will be like the apocalyptic book, sealed with seven seals if necessary, and we unhesitatingly say, “Let His will be done.”

3. Love also suggests unquestioning reverence.

4. It creates sympathetic feeling. When our nature gets to be like His nature--oh, what a blessed consummation that is!--when our wishes and His wishes travel the same road, though not with equal footsteps; when that which He aims at is that which we aim at after our poor fashion; when we can say that it is more delight to us that He should be delighted than that we should be delighted ourselves, and that it is a greater honour to us to see Him honoured than it would be to be honoured ourselves; when we sink ourselves in Him, even as two divided streams at last dissolve into one--as I have seen a tiny silver brook come clown to Father Thames, and pour its whole self into him, so as to be no longer anything but part of the great river--so, when our soul yields itself up in perfect love to Christ, to think His thoughts, and live and move in Him so that it is no longer we who live but Christ Who liveth in us; oh, then it is that whatsoever the King doeth pleaseth all His people! When the believer comes to be what He should be in the fulness of his love, his will is lost in the will of Christ, his very life is hidden away with Christ in God, and then he realises how true it is that whatsoever the King doeth pleaseth all His people.

II. The love that manifests itself thus is the consequence of knowledge. Human love is blind; but the love which is wrought in us by the Spirit of God is as full of eyes as are the great wheels of Divine Providence. There is the best of reasons why everything that Jesus does should please all His people, because everything He does is right, and we shall feel this in proportion as we combine knowledge with love, or our love is based on knowledge.

1. We know the character of Christ.

2. We know something of His designs, and we know that He designs the glory of the Father through the salvation of those the Father gave him.

3. We know something of His modes of operation. We have learned that it is His habit often to disguise Himself; His way is in the sea, and His path in the great waters, and His footsteps are not known except to those who are familiar with Him.

4. We know something of our Lord’s rights, and therefore we can never venture to interfere with His actions.

III. This is the secret of rest: “Whatsoever the king did pleased all the people.” To know that the King has done it, and to see His Divine hand in anything, is more than half the battle which ends in sweet content. When you have seen God’s hand, then say, “I would not have it otherwise than it is.” I know several persons who are always in trouble and unhappy because there is a dispute between them and God. I remember one to whom I solemnly spoke, years ago, and not long after he passed away. I went to see his dying child, the only one he had left, and he said to me, “Do not talk to my daughter about death, do not mention it to her.” “Well, then,” I said, “if I may not mention death, I will not go upstairs.” The father said to me, “God could not take that child away.” He had lost several before, and he said that, if his daughter died, he should call God a tyrant, and I know not what. At last I stood before him, and I said, “You are making for yourself a rod that is much heavier than God Himself lays upon you. I fear that you will yourself die if you act in this way.” As he could not be brought to reason, and kicked and rebelled against God’s dealings with him, I was not surprised to learn that, soon after his child died, he himself also died. It does not do to quarrel with God; let the potsherds of the earth strive with other potsherds if they will, but woe to him who contendeth with his Maker! Instead of that, bow before him, not only because you must, but because you delight to acknowledge him as your Lord.

IV. “Lastly, this will be a lesson in obedience.

1. Whatever service the King requires of you will please you.

2. Oftentimes, we are permitted to work hard, and yet to meet with great discouragement. It was a pretty remark I read, the other day, of a Christian man who said, “I used to have many disappointments, until I changed one letter of the word, and chopped it into two, so that instead of ‘disappointments,’ I read it ‘His appointments.’” That was a wonderful change, for “disappointments” break your heart, but “His appointments” you accept right cheerily. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Samuel 3:36". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-samuel-3.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And all the people took notice of it,.... Not only of his oath, that he would not eat food till evening, but of his whole conduct at the funeral of Abner; the sorrow he expressed for his death, and the oration he made on account of it, in which he pretty severely reflected on his murderer:

and it pleased them; that he showed such a concern for his death, and that it was a clear case he had no hand in it:

as whatsoever the king did pleased all the people; what he did at this time, burying Abhor with so much pomp and ceremony; and indeed he had so much the hearts of the people, and such a share in their affections, and they had such an high opinion of him, that all that he did in public and private affairs they reckoned well done; they were highly approved of by them, such an interest had he in them.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:36". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And all the people took notice [of it], and it p pleased them: as whatsoever the king did pleased all the people.

(p) It is expedient sometimes not only to conceive inward sorrow, but also that it may appear to others, so that they may be satisfied.
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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:36". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-3.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And all the people took notice of it, and it pleased them: as whatsoever the king did pleased all the people.

Pleased them — They were satisfied concerning David's integrity.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:36". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-3.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

pleased

was good in their eyes.

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
Bibliographical Information
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on 2 Samuel 3:36". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/2-samuel-3.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 3:36 And all the people took notice [of it], and it pleased them: as whatsoever the king did pleased all the people.

Ver. 36. Pleased all the people.] This was both hard and happy: a great contentment doubtless to good David.

Eργμασιν εν μεγαλοις πασιν αδειν, χαλεπον.” - Theog.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:36". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-3.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Took notice of it; observed what the king said and did. It pleased them; they were satisfied concerning David’s integrity, and the method he used here for his own just vindication.

Whatsoever the king did; either in this matter; or rather, in all things following this action. The meaning is, by his carriage herein he gained so great an interest in the hearts of his people, that they judged most favourably of, and put the best construction upon, all his words and actions; as, on the contrary, when people have a prejudice against or an ill will towards their prince, they are apt to judge most harshly of all his counsels and doings.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:36". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-3.html. 1685.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

pleased them = was good in their eyes.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:36". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-3.html. 1909-1922.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And all the people took notice of it, and it pleased them: as whatsoever the king did pleased all the people.
pleased them
Heb. was good in their eyes. as.
15:6,13; Psalms 62:9; Mark 7:37; 15:11-13
Reciprocal: Genesis 41:37 - good;  Genesis 45:16 - it pleased Pharaoh well;  1 Chronicles 13:4 - the thing;  Acts 15:22 - pleased

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 3:36". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-3.html.