Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 5:12

And David realized that the Lord had established him as king over Israel, and that He had exalted his kingdom for the sake of His people Israel.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Thompson Chain Reference - Discernment-Dullness;   Insight;   Perception, Spiritual;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - David;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Exaltation;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Masons;   Samuel, Books of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Israel;   Samuel, Books of;   Solomon;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Preparation;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Israel kingdom of;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Samuel, Books of;  

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And David perceived that the Lord had established him king over Israel,.... By the prosperity and success which attended him in everything he set his hand to:

and that he had exalted his kingdom for his people Israel's sake; for their advantage and glory more than for his own.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:12". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-5.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And David perceived that the LORD had established him king over Israel, and that he had exalted his kingdom for his people Israel's sake.

King over Israel — That he might be a blessing to them, and they might be happy under his administration.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:12". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-5.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 5:12 And David perceived that the LORD had established him king over Israel, and that he had exalted his kingdom for his people Israel’s sake.

Ver. 12. And David perceived that the Lord had established him.] He partly perceived it by this extraordinary kindness of Hiram toward him; but especially by the inward certification by God’s Holy Spirit, as Lyra noteth.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:12". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-5.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 5:12

I. Two memorable passages in the history of David,—the establishment of his capital, and the removal of the ark to the hill above it,—illustrate the principles upon which his kingdom stood, and show wherein it differed from the great Asiatic empires which were then contemporary with it. The civic life, the life of cities, was with other nations the beginning, with the Jews it was the result of a long process. In the first, you have a despotism, which becomes more expansive and more oppressive from day to day; in the other case, you have a struggle, sometimes a weary struggle, but it is the struggle of spirits, it is a struggle for life. The ark spoke to the Israelites of a permanent Being, of a righteous Being, always above His creatures, always desiring fellowship with them, a fellowship which they could only realise when they were seeking to be like Him. Their king ruled so long as his throne was based upon righteousness; the moment he sought for any other foundation, he would become weak and contemptible. All David's discipline had been designed to settle him in this truth. He was the man after God's own heart, because he so graciously received that discipline and imbibed that truth. The signal sin of his life confirmed it still more mightily for himself and for all ages to come.

II. The discipline which followed upon David's sin was not for him more than for his people, nor for his people more than for all ages to come. That which enabled David, crushed and broken, to be more than ever the man after God's own heart, was also that which fitted him to be a ruler,—-by understanding the only condition on which it is possible for a man to exercise real dominion over others, viz. when he gives up himself, that they may know God and not him to be their sovereign. One of the best proofs that his schooling was effectual is this, that all his family griefs, his experience of his own evil, the desertion of his subjects, did not lead him to fancy that he should be following a course acceptable to God if he retired to the deserts instead of doing the work which was appointed for him. He found out the necessity of seeking God continually, because he learnt how weak he was, and how little he could be a king over men when the image of the Divine kingdom was not present to him.

III. We might have expected to see David's sun setting in splendour, to be told of some great acts, or hear some noble words which would assure us that he died a saint. The Bible does not in the least satisfy this expectation. We must turn elsewhere than to the Old or New Testament for deathbed scenes. Its warriors fight the good fight. We know that in some battle or other they finish their course. When or how, under what circumstances of humiliation or triumph, we are not told. Not by momentary flashes does God bid us judge of our fellow-creatures, for He who reads the heart, and sees the meaning and purpose of it, judges not by these.

F. D. Maurice, Prophets and Kings of the Old Testament, p. 53.


References: 2 Samuel 5:19.—F.W. Krummacher, David the King of Israel, p. 267. 2 Samuel 5:23.—Spurgeon, Morning by Morning, p. 40. 2 Samuel 5:24.—S. Cox, Expositions, 3rd series, p. 441; Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. iii., No. 147; Ibid., Morning by Morning, p. 30; Homiletic Quarterly, vol. ii., p. 406. 2 Samuel 6:5.—Parker, vol. vii., p. 233. 2 Samuel 6:6, 2 Samuel 6:7.—Homiletic Magazine, vol. vii., p. 281. 2 Samuel 6:14, 2 Samuel 6:15.—F. W. Krummacher, David the King of Israel, pp. 280, 300. 2 Samuel 6:15.—J. Ker, Sermons, 2nd series, p. 162; T. Coster, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxii., p. 132. 2 Samuel 6:20.—G. Brooks, Outlines of Sermons, p. 217; Parker, vol. vii., p. 234. 2 Samuel 6:20, 2 Samuel 6:21.—J. M. Neale, Sermons for the Church Year, vol. ii., p. 127. 2 Samuel 6:20-22.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. vi., p. 321. 2Sam 6—Parker, vol. vii., p. 117. 2 Samuel 7:1, 2 Samuel 7:2.—Plain Sermons by Contributors to the "Tracts for the Times" vol. ii., p. 41. 2 Samuel 7:2.—S. Martin, Rain upon the Mown Grass, p. 56. 2 Samuel 7:12-16.—J. G. Murphy, Book of Daniel, p. 32. 2 Samuel 7:18.—J. Van Oosterzee, Year of Salvation, vol. ii., p. 454. 2 Samuel 7:18-20.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xx., No. 1166. 2 Samuel 7:19.—Parker, vol. vii., p. 235. 2 Samuel 7:25.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. ii., No. 88; Ibid., Morning by Morning, p. 15. 2 Samuel 7:27.—Ibid., Sermons, vol. xxiv., No. 1412; Ibid., My Sermon Notes, Genesis to Proverbs, p. 67. 2Sam 7—W. M. Taylor, David King of Israel, p. 169. 2Sam 7-8.—Parker, vol. vii., p. 128. 2 Samuel 8:6.—J. Irons, Thursday Penny Pulpit, vol. xvi., p. 105. 2 Samuel 8:15.—F. W. Krummacher, David the King of Israel, p. 340; W. M. Taylor, David King of Israel, p. 180. 2 Samuel 9:1.—W. Walters, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxi., p. 248. 2 Samuel 9:7.—F. W. Krummacher, David the King of Israel, p. 326. 2 Samuel 9:8.—Spurgeon, Evening by Evening, p. 148. 2 Samuel 9:13.—Ibid., Morning by Morning, p. 148. 2 Samuel 9:2-7.—W. M. Taylor, David King of Israel, p. 196. 2Sam 9—Ibid., p. 169. 2Sam 9—Parker, vol. vii., p. 139. 2 Samuel 10:10.—Old Testament Outlines, p. 02.



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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:12". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/2-samuel-5.html.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

By reflecting upon the promises which God had made. him, and the constant course of God’s providence favouring him.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:12". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

12.David perceived — He was convinced by the signal providences attending his own personal history, and the strength and honour of his kingdom, that his prosperity was of the Lord. How strong is he whose growing greatness is enhanced by the consciousness of Jehovah’s favour!

For his people Israel’s sake — David’s ways were not always right, yet for Israel’s sake, and for his own great Name’s sake, Jehovah blessed him. Marvellous was God’s favour and regard for his chosen people.

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:12". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-5.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 5:12. For his people Israel’s sake — Well would it be for mankind if all kings had the same view of the design of their exaltation to the sovereignty; if they considered themselves as being raised to their high station for the good of their people; that this is the great end of their appointment; the pursuit of this end their great duty; and the attainment of it their true glory. Certainly great and good kings of all ages have been of this way of thinking: they have believed, not that the people were created and ordained by God for the king, but the king for the people.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:12". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-5.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

CHAPTER V.

Over. Hebrew, "for." The king is bound to promote the welfare of his people. (Calmet) --- But the same word means "over," as the Protestants allow. (Haydock) --- Success constantly attending David, was an earnest that the Lord had not rejected him. (Calmet)

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:12". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-5.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And David perceived that the LORD had established him king over Israel, and that he had exalted his kingdom for his people Israel's sake.

No JFB commentary on this verse.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(12) For his people Israel’s sake.—David’s prosperity had not blinded him to the fact that his blessings came to him as the head of the theocracy, and for the sake of God’s chosen people.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:12". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And David perceived that the LORD had established him king over Israel, and that he had exalted his kingdom for his people Israel's sake.
David
7:16; 1 Chronicles 14:2
his people
1 Kings 10:9; 2 Chronicles 2:11; Esther 4:14; Isaiah 1:25-27; Daniel 2:30
Reciprocal: Numbers 24:7 - his kingdom;  2 Samuel 22:49 - thou also;  1 Chronicles 14:1 - Hiram;  2 Chronicles 13:21 - waxed

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 5:12". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-5.html.