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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Hebrews 1:12

AND LIKE A MANTLE YOU WILL ROLL THEM UP; LIKE A GARMENT THEY WILL ALSO BE CHANGED. BUT YOU ARE THE SAME, AND YOUR YEARS WILL NOT COME TO AN END."

Adam Clarke Commentary

And they shall be changed - Not destroyed ultimately, or annihilated. They shall be changed and renewed.

But thou art the same - These words can be said of no being but God; all others are changeable or perishable, because temporal; only that which is eternal can continue essentially, and, speaking after the manner of men, formally the same.

Thy years shall not fail - There is in the Divine duration no circle to be run, no space to be measured, no time to be reckoned.

All is eternity - infinite and onward.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/hebrews-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And as a vesture - A garment; literally something thrown around - περιβόλαιον peribolaion- and denoting properly the outer garment, the cloak or mantle; see notes, Matthew 5:40. “Shalt thou fold them up.” That is, the heavens. They are represented in the Scriptures as an “expanse.” or something spread out (the Hebrew text of Genesis 1:7): as a “curtain,” or “tent” Isaiah 40:22, and as a “scroll” that might be spread out or rolled up like a book or volume, Isaiah 34:4; Revelation 6:14. Here they are represented as a garment or mantle that might be folded up - language borrowed from folding up and laying aside garments that are no longer fit for use. “And they shall be changed.” That is, they shall be exchanged for others, or they shall give place to the new heavens and the new earth; 2 Peter 3:13. The meaning is, that the present form of the heavens and the earth is not to be permanent, but is to be succeeded by others, or to pass away, but that the Creator is to remain the same. “Thou art the same.” Thou wilt not change. “And thy years shall not fail.” Thou wilt exist forever unchanged. What could more clearly prove that he of whom this is spoken is immutable? Yet it is indubitably spoken of the Messiah, and must demonstrate that he is divine. These attributes cannot be conferred on a creature; and nothing can be clearer than that he who penned the Epistle believed that the Son of God was divine.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/hebrews-1.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up,.... In order to lay them aside, and make no use of them in the manner they now are; just as clothes, when they are grown old, or out of fashion, are folded up, and laid aside from use at present, or are put into another form. In the Hebrew text it is, "as a vesture shalt thou change them"; but the sense is the same, for a garment is changed by folding it, or turning it; agreeably to which Jarchi interprets the Hebrew phrase thus,

"as a man turns his garment to put it off;'

the Vulgate Latin version reads as the Hebrew does, and one of the manuscripts of New College, Oxford.

And they shall be changed; as to their form and use, not as to their being; for a change, and an annihilation, are two things:

but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail; which is expressive of the immutability of Christ, in his nature and perfections, in his person, and offices, in the virtue of his blood, righteousness, and sacrifice; and of his duration or continuance, in opposition to the fading and transitory nature of the heavens and earth, and of all outward enjoyments: and this may serve to take off the heart from the one, and set it upon the other; and to strengthen our faith in Christ, and encourage us to expect a continuance of blessings from him; all supplies of grace now, and eternal glory hereafter.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/hebrews-1.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

vestureGreek, “an enwrapping cloak.”

fold them up — So the Septuagint, Psalm 102:26; but the Hebrew,change them.” The Spirit, by Paul, treats the Hebrew of the Old Testament, with independence of handling, presenting the divine truth in various aspects; sometimes as here sanctioning the Septuagint (compare Isaiah 34:4; Revelation 6:14); sometimes the Hebrew; sometimes varying from both.

changed — as one lays aside a garment to put on another.

thou art the same — (Isaiah 46:4; Malachi 3:6). The same in nature, therefore in covenant faithfulness to Thy people.

shall not failHebrew, “shall not end.” Israel, in the Babylonian captivity, in the hundred second Psalm, casts her hopes of deliverance on Messiah, the unchanging covenant God of Israel.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/hebrews-1.html. 1871-8.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

12. “Thou wilt roll them away like a book, and they shall be changed.” Books of olden time were skins of animals inscribed and rolled up like a side of leather. This is a vivid description of the wonderful transformations which Omnipotence will execute in the great and radical revolutions and renovations which await the material worlds in the coming ages.


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Bibliography
Godbey, William. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/hebrews-1.html.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

A mantle (περιβολαιονperibolaion). Old word for covering from παριβαλλωpariballō to fling around, as a veil in 1 Corinthians 11:15, nowhere else in N.T.

Shalt thou roll up (ελιχειςhelixeis). Future active of ελισσωhelissō late form for ειλισσωheilissō in N.T. only here and Revelation 6:14, to fold together.

As a garment
(ως ιματιονhōs himation). lxx repeats from Hebrews 1:11.

They shall be changed
(αλλαγησονταιallagēsontai). Second future passive of αλλασσωallassō old verb, to change.

Shall not fail
(ουκ εκλειπσουσινouk ekleipsousin). Future active of εκλειπωekleipō to leave out, to fail, used of the sun in Luke 23:45. “Nature is at his mercy, not he at nature‘s” (Moffatt).


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/hebrews-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Vesture ( περιβόλαιον )

Only here and 1 Corinthians 11:5. From περιβάλλειν tothrow around: a wrapper, mantle.

Shalt thou fold them up ( ἑλίξεις αὐτούς )

Rather, roll them up. A scribal error for ἀλλάξεις shaltchange. After these words the lxx repeats ὡς ἱμάτιον asa garment from Hebrews 1:11.

Shall not fail ( οὐκ ἐκλείψουσιν )

Shall not be ended. With this exception the verb only in Luke's Gospel. See Luke 16:9; Luke 22:32; Luke 23:45. Very frequent in lxx.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/hebrews-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.

As a mantle — With all ease.

They shall be changed — Into new heavens and a new earth. But thou art eternally the same.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/hebrews-1.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

A vesture; a garment.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/hebrews-1.html. 1878.

William Newell's Commentary on Romans and Revelation

And as a mantle shalt Thou roll them up, As a garment, and they shalt be exchanged:

What an expression and prophecy! Christ will be the One before Whose face earth and Heaven flee away. Note the word exchanged, rather than changed,* for there shall be a new Heaven and a new earth, in place of the old, which shall utterly pass away.

* "To cause one thing to cease, and another to take its place."--Thayer.

As Stuart well remarks, "The heavens are often represented as an expanse, and to roll them up, is of course to remove them. The language, however, in the case before us, is borrowed from the custom of folding up, laying aside, garments that have become unfit for use."

Covert says of the new heavens and the new earth: "Both heavens and earth are _new. They are of new materials: not merely a purifying of the old. They are not new because they are a fresh modification of the old materials! This verse teaches us that the heavens and earth are new in their materials, as well as in their form. 'The earth is new, for the old earth passed away.' If I say 'A new man-of-war graced the port of Plymouth, for the old Victory foundered in the Atlantic'--none would suspect me of asserting that the old vessel was fished up, and that its timbers, rearranged, constituted the new vessel. 'The former earth and heaven passed away.' The former chapter exhibited the destruction of the old creation; it had no longer any locality. Now we are presented with the final state which succeeds."

We hear also Isa. 51:6: "Lift up your eyes to the heavens, and look upon the earth beneath; for the heavens shall vanish away like smoke, and the earth shall wax old like a garment." "The course of thought is easily traced: as the garment which has grown old is rolled up and changed, so the former heavens and earth shall give place to the new heavens and the new earth."--Moulton.

But Thou art the same, and Thy years shall not fail. Here we see Christ's uncaused continuance of being. Every creature changes, every creature's years fail, for creatures are dependent. God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit, three in One, are not dependent, but are seen to all eternity-past, and to come!


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Bibliography
Newell, William. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". William Newell's Commentary on Romans, Hebrews and Revelation. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wnc/hebrews-1.html. 1938.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE UNCHANGEABLENESS OF GOD

‘Thou art the same, and Thy years shall not fail.’

Hebrews 1:12

As against our feeling that we have made our own fate, that our sins have laid such hold upon us that we are not able to look up, the redeeming entry of God upon His disordered world is above all the manifestation of His invincible and unchanging love, not to be diverted from its purpose, from the triumphant achievement of the will of love, by any failure of man, by any apparent impossibility of raising man from the pit into which he has sunk himself beyond the reach of human hope.

I. This redeeming power of God to recreate good out of evil is not merely an idea; thank God it is an experience. We know in the history of our own souls how God can renew the life, out of the materials in which our own sins and failings have left it to Him to work, can rebuild the story of our hope. We know enough to know with absolute assurance that there is nothing we can have done or left undone which can have carried us beyond the range of the renewing power of His forgiving and recreative love. The broad lesson of the redeeming love of God, which is writ large for us in the Christmas mystery of God coming down into a world of sin, is reflected in our own experience of its truth and confirmed to be the ground of a future and immediate hope.

II. The invincible power of the unchangeable love of God is in this revelation of experience made more abundantly plain when we consider the unchangeableness of God’s love in relation to our sense of a fate that binds us to be what we have always been. For the unchangeableness of the love is shown in its unfailingly progressive manifestation. At each step in the lesson of life and of experience we see that God is the same, because His compassions fail not, they are new every morning—the same love which we have known all along unfolds fresh glories of hope. The unchanging love of God shows itself in a perpetual surprise. Always it achieves something far beyond what we hoped for or desired. The unchanging love of God says always, ‘Behold, I make all things new.’

III. The crowning wonder of His Redemption is that in the redemption from sin, whether it be the redemption of the world or of our own individual character, the result which we see wrought out of the materials of our failure and our sin attains a revelation of love so perfect and complete, a progress so unfailing, so unchecked, that we cannot conceive or imagine that it could have been greater or more glorious than it is. We cannot conceive it, and we are right. God cannot change. Nothing can change Him, nothing can defeat Him.

—Rev. Wilfrid Richmond.

Illustration

‘From moods of moral depression we rise to a real and living hope as we come face to face with the master truth of the unchangeableness of the Eternal God. He is the same. For it is not mere unchangeableness with which we are face to face. We misconceive the attributes of God whenever we isolate them from one another. It is the unchangeableness of the invincible and eternal love of God with which we are face to face. This is the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end of the Creation of God.’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/hebrews-1.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

12 And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.

Ver. 12. But thou art the same] As in essence, so in will and counsel. Repentance with man is the changing of his will; repentance with God is the willing of a change; Mutatio rei, non Dei, effectus non affectus, facti non consilii.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/hebrews-1.html. 1865-1868.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Hebrews 1:12. καὶ ὡσεὶ περιβόλαιον ἑλίξεις αὐτοὺς καὶ ἀλλαγήσονται] and as a cloak (something flung about one) wilt Thou roll them up, and they shall become changed. In the original: As the vesture dost Thou change them, and they are changed. This sense of the original is rendered by the LXX. according to the reading of the Cod. Vat.: καὶ ὡσεὶ περιβόλαιον ἀλλάξεις αὐτοὺς καὶ ἀλλαγήσονται; whereas the Cod. Alex. presents ἑλίξεις; and this is also most probably the reading followed by the author of the Epistle to the Hebrews in our passage.

οὐκ ἐκλείψουσιν] will know no end.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/hebrews-1.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Hebrews 1:12. ἀλλάξεις, Thou shalt change.— ἀλλαγήσονται, they shall be changed) Many read for ἀλλάξεις, ἑλίξεις: but there is the one verb חלף twice in the Hebrew, which the LXX. often translate ἀλλάσσω, never by ἑλίσσω.(9) αὐτὸς) הוא, the same, never another (anything different), without old age and change. See Hiller, Onom., p. 71, 262. So 1 Samuel 2:10 יהוה, LXX. αὐτός.

AB and the oldest MS. of Vulg. Amiat. have ἑλίξεις D( δ) corrected, f, and Victor’s Vulg., have ἀλλάξεις.—ED.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/hebrews-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up: peribolaion is an upper garment, cloak, or coat, which a man puts on or casts off at his pleasure; when it is of no more use it is folded up and laid by: so the great gospel Minister, God the Son incarnate, shall roll up the natural heavens when useless, and lay them by.

And they shall be changed; by him they shall be altered, and made more glorious by new modelling them, changing of them into a better state, Isaiah 34:4 65:17 66:22: compare 2 Peter 3:10-13.

But thou art the same: the identity of this Person is opposed to the changeableness of excellent creatures, and showeth him to be what he is here entitled, Jehovah, Hebrews 13:8. His assumption of the humanity to his person made no alteration in him, being still the same most excellent person as ever, Malachi 3:1,6 1 Corinthians 12:5.

And thy years shall not fail; as the being of God the Son is not measured nor terminated by years or time, so, in respect of his humanity, the years which were the measure of it shall never fail; for being raised from the dead, he shall die no more, but

abideth for ever, John 12:34, and ruleth, as foretold, Luke 1:33 1 Peter 4:11. How transcendently excellent is He, who is immutable and eternal, for state and name above angels!


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/hebrews-1.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

As Christ made, sustains, and governs all things, and will remain unchangeable for ever, it is safe to trust in him, and to commit all our interests to his care and disposal.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/hebrews-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

12. ἑλιξεις αὐτούς, “Thou shalt roll them up.” This reading (ἑλίξεις) is found in most MSS. and is perhaps an unconscious reminiscence of Isaiah 34:4 (comp. Revelation 6:14); but א, D read “thou shalt change them” (ἀλλάξεις ), as in the original, and in the LXX. (Cod. Alex.). On this final consummation, and the destruction of the material universe, see Matthew 24:35; 2 Peter 3:7; Revelation 21:1.

σὺ δὲ ὁ αὐτὸς εἶ. In the Hebrew (literally) “Thou art He” (הוּא ).

τὰ ἔτη σου οὐκ ἐκλείψουσιν, i.e. they shall never come to an end (Hebrews 13:8; Revelation 1:8). The verb is used in the LXX. and by St Luke 16:9; Luke 22:32. The neut. plur., as is not unusual, here takes a plural verb. So too in John 19:31; 1 Timothy 5:25. See Winer, p. 646.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/hebrews-1.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

12. As a vesture—By a figure of great majesty in this verse God is an infinite Person, and the universe is his immense raiment. As a person takes off, folds up, and throws aside when old, his garments, so God deals with phenomenal things. But, contrastively, the person remains the same, and of God’s person the years shall not fail; they shall roll forever onward.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/hebrews-1.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Hebrews 1:12. As a mantle shalt thou roll them up, as a garment also shall they be changed—a quotation from Psalms 102, with the words ‘as a garment’ added, on the authority of the best MSS. The heavens and the earth are to be lolled up as done with, and they are to be changed for a new heaven and a new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/hebrews-1.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

vesture. Greek. peribolaion. Onlyhere and 1 Corinthians 11:15

fold . . . up = roll . . . up. Greek. helisso. Only here. But see Revelation 6:14.

changed. Greek. allaaso. See Acts 6:14.

fail. Greek. ekleipo. Only here, and Luke 16:9; Luke 22:32. Verses 10-12 are from Psalms 102:25-27.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/hebrews-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.

Vesture , [ peribolaion (Greek #4018)] - 'an enwrapping cloak.'

Fold them up. Septuagint, Psalms 102:26 [ helixeis (Greek #1667)]; but Hebrew, 'change them.' The Spirit, by Paul, treats the Old Testament with independence of handling, presenting the divine truth in various aspects; sometimes sanctioning Septuagint (cf. Isaiah 34:4; Revelation 6:14); sometimes the Hebrew; sometimes varying from both.

Changed - as one lays aside a garment to put on another.

Thou art the same (Isaiah 46:4; Malachi 3:6). The same in nature, therefore in covenant faithfulness to thy people.

Shall not fail - Hebrew, 'end.' Israel in Babylon, in Psalms 102:1-28, casts her hopes of deliverance on Messiah, Israel's unchanging covenant-God.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/hebrews-1.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(12) And as a vesture . . .—Rather (see Hebrews 1:10), And as a mantle shalt Thou roll them up; as a garment shall they also be changed. The course of thought is easily traced: as the garment which has grown old is rolled up and changed, so the former heavens and earth shall give place to the new heavens and the new earth.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/hebrews-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.
but
13:8; Exodus 3:14; John 8:58; James 1:17
and thy
Psalms 90:4

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/hebrews-1.html.

The Bible Study New Testament

You will fold them up. Earth and sky will be folded like a coat. See 2 Peter 3:10-13. But you are always the same. The Son is eternal. He was always with the Father, He will always be with the Father. The Son (as the Logos) is UNCREATE! Not so the angels, who are a type of Creation.


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/hebrews-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

A vesture is a covering piece, to be folded up or discarded when no longer useful. Changed is from ALLASSO which Thayer defines, "To exchange one thing for another." This is said with reference to the earth and the other parts of the material universe related to it. They are finally to be discarded and dissolved, and other things will be used in their place. (See 2 Peter 3:10-13; Revelation 21:1.) Thou art the same. Not that Christ will never change his position in the great plan of God, for He will cease to be the king after the judgment day ( 1 Corinthians 15:24-27). But He will never cease to be (as will the material universe), and in that sense His years shall not fail.


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Bibliography
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/hebrews-1.html. 1952.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans

And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.

And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall he changed.—The first creation shall, like a vesture, be folded up and laid aside.

But thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.—This is a most decided testimony to the supreme Divinity of the Lord Jesus. He is the same. The word is used, chap. He is the unchangeable Jehovah. The years of the heavens and the earth are numbered, and shall fail, not so the years of the Son of God, the Ancient of days.

The expression "changed" merits attention. We know nothing of annihilation; probably there is no such thing in the universe. God created nothing in vain; annihilation means any substance being reduced to nothing. We have no experience of this; the body is changed to dust, fuel into smoke, water into steam, and here we read that the heavens and the earth shall be changed.

Even had the Apostle not applied Psalm 102:24-27 to Christ, we might have been led to it by the last verse: "The children of thy servants shall continue, and their seed shall be established before thee." Applying the Psalm from verse24to Christ, all is plain and easy. In the depth of His humiliation He is acknowledged as the great Creator, and assured that the children of His servants should continue, and their seed be established before Him. This is very beautiful and consoling as applied to Christ, and exactly corresponds with many promises made to the Lord Jesus. Psalm 22:30-31; Psalm 45:16; Psalm 69:36. Isaiah 53:10; Isaiah 59:21.

In this quotation we have another most explicit testimony to the supreme Divinity of Christ. He is not only declared to be superior to angels, but to be "over all, God blessed for ever." Romans 9:5. This is shown by His being represented as seated on His eternal throne, Hebrews 1:8; and not only having in His character of mediator the preeminence over all those with whom he had condescended to unite himself, but as the Creator of all things. Amidst all the changes which he would effect on the works of His hands, in order to adapt them to His infinitely wise purposes, He remains for ever the same, and with Him there is no variableness or shadow of turning. James 1:17.


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Bibliography
Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:12". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/hebrews-1.html. 1835.

Lectionary Calendar
Friday, January 24th, 2020
the Second Week after Epiphany
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