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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Hebrews 1:11

THEY WILL PERISH, BUT YOU REMAIN; AND THEY ALL WILL BECOME OLD LIKE A GARMENT,

Adam Clarke Commentary

They shall perish - Permanently fixed as they seem to be, a time shall come when they shall be dissolved, and afterward new heavens and a new earth be formed, in which righteousness alone shall dwell. See 2 Peter 3:10-13.

Shall wax old as doth a garment - As a garment by long using becomes unfit to be longer used, so shall all visible things; they shall wear old, and wear out; and hence the necessity of their being renewed. It is remarkable that our word world is a contraction of wear old; a term by which our ancestors expressed the sentiment contained in this verse. That the word was thus compounded, and that it had this sense in our language, may be proved from the most competent and indisputable witnesses. It was formerly written weorold, and wereld . This etymology is finely alluded to by our excellent poet, Spencer, when describing the primitive age of innocence, succeeded by the age of depravity: -

"The lion there did with the lambe consort,

And eke the dove sat by the faulcon's side;

Ne each of other feared fraude or tort,

But did in safe security abide,

Withouten perill of the stronger pride:

But when the World woxe old, it woxe warre old,

Whereof it hight, and having shortly tride

The trains of wit, in wickednesse woxe bold,

And dared of all sinnes, the secrets to unfold."

Even the heathen poets are full of such allusions. See Horace, Carm. lib. iii., od. 6; Virgil, Aen. viii., ver. 324.

Thou remainest - Instead of διαμένεις, some good MSS. read διαμενεῖς, the first, without the circumflex, being the present tense of the indicative mood; the latter, with the circumflex, being the future - thou shalt remain. The difference between these two readings is of little importance.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/hebrews-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

They shall perish - That is, the heavens and the earth. They shall pass away; or they shall be destroyed. Probably no more is meant by the phrase here, than that important changes will take place in them, or than that they will change their form. Still it is not possible to foresee what changes may yet take place in the heavenly bodies, or to say that the present universe may not at some period be destroyed, and be succeeded by another creation still more magnificent. He that created the universe by a word, can destroy it by a word and he that formed the present frame of nature can cause it to be succeeded by another not less wonderful and glorious. The Scriptures seem to hold out the idea that the present frame of the universe shall be destroyed; see 2 Peter 3:10-13; Matthew 24:35. “But thou remainest.” Thou shalt not die or be destroyed. What a sublime thought! The idea is, that though the heavens and earth should suddenly disappear, or though they should gradually wear out and become extinct, yet there is one infinite being who remains unaffected and unchanged.

Nothing can reach or disturb him. All these changes shall take place under his direction, and by his command; see Revelation 20:11. Let us not be alarmed then at any revolution. Let us not fear though we should see the heavens rolled up as a scroll, and the stars falling from their places. God, the Creator and the Redeemer, presides over all. He is unchanged. He ever lives; and though the universe should pass away, it will be only at his bidding, and under his direction. “And they all shall wax old.” Shall “grow” or become old. The word “wax” is an Old Saxon word, meaning to grow, or increase, or become. The heavens here are compared to a garment, meaning that as that grows old and decays, so it will be with the heavens and the earth. The language is evidently figurative; and yet who can tell how much literal truth there may be couched under it? Is it absurd to suppose that that sun which daily sends forth so many countless millions of beams of light over the universe, may in a course of ages become diminished in its splendor, and shine with feeble lustre? Can there be constant exhaustion, a constant burning like that, and yet no tendency to decay at some far distant period? Not unless the material for its splendor shall be supplied from the boundless resources of the Great Source of Light - God; and when he shall choose to withhold it, even that glorious sun must be dimmed of its splendor, and shine with enfeebled beams.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/hebrews-1.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

They shall perish,.... That is, the heavens and the earth; not as to the substance of them, but as to the quality of them; the present form and fashion of them shall pass away; the curse will be removed from them, and they will be renewed and purified, but the substance of them will continue; otherwise there would be no place, either for the righteous or the wicked,

But thou remainest; without any change or alteration, neither in his natures, divine or human, as God or man, nor in his office as Mediator; as a priest, he has an unchangeable priesthood, and ever lives to make intercession; as a King, his kingdom is an everlasting one, and of it there will be no end; and as a prophet, he will be the everlasting light, of his people.

They all shall wax old as doth a garment; garments in time wax old, and lose their beauty and usefulness, unless when a miracle is wrought, as in the case of the children of Israel in the wilderness. Now the heavens, and the light thereof, are as a garment and a curtain, Psalm 104:2 and these, together with the earth, will in time come to their end of usefulness, in the present form of them; see Isaiah 51:6.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/hebrews-1.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

They — The earth and the heavens in their present state and form “shall perish” (Hebrews 12:26, Hebrews 12:27; 2 Peter 3:13). “Perish” does not mean annihilation; just as it did not mean so in the case of “the world that being overflowed with water, perished” under Noah (2 Peter 3:6). The covenant of the possession of the earth was renewed with Noah and his seed on the renovated earth. So it shall be after the perishing by fire (2 Peter 3:12, 2 Peter 3:13).

remainestthrough (so the Greek) all changes.

as … a garment — (Isaiah 51:6).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/hebrews-1.html. 1871-8.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

11. “These will perish,” i.e. they will cease to exist in their present form; they will undergo revolutions, transformations and renovations. “All these will grow old like a garment.” The earth is rapidly wearing out and washing away into the sea, and losing its pristine fertility, significant of the fact that we are fast approaching the end of the present order of things.


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Bibliography
Godbey, William. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/hebrews-1.html.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

They (αυτοιautoi). The heavens (ουρανοιouranoi).

Shall perish (απολουνταιapolountai). Future middle of απολλυμιapollumi Modern scientists no longer postulate the eternal existence of the heavenly bodies.

But thou continuest
(συ δε διαμενειςsu de diameneis). This is what matters most, the eternal existence of God‘s Son as Creator and Preserver of the universe (John 1:1-3; Colossians 1:14.).

Shall wax old
(παλαιωτησονταιpalaiōthēsontai). First future passive indicative of παλαιοωpalaioō from παλαιοςpalaios for which see Luke 12:33; Hebrews 8:13.


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/hebrews-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

They ( αὐτοὶ )

The heavens: not heaven and earth.

Remainest ( διαμένεις )

Note the present tense: not shalt remain. Permanency is the characteristic of God in the absolute and eternal present.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/hebrews-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

William Newell's Commentary on Romans and Revelation

Verse 11: They shall perish; but Thou continuest; And they all shall wax old, as doth a garment.

Here self-existent Deity is ascribed to Christ. Then as to what He has made, the earth, the heavens: They shall perish, as contrasted with Christ's continued existence. Our Lord Himself said, "Heaven and earth shall pass away." It is not in God's mind to preserve forever this present creation. Its end is revealed in they shall perish ... wax old ... be rolled up ... exchanged! How brief is the existence of present created things! Poor man, in all his thinking and living, treats the present earth and heavens as abiding. The mockers of the last days make what they regard as the fixed permanence of the universe the basis of their scoffing at Christ's coming, with the stupendous changes it involves, saying, "Where is the promise of His coming? for, from the day that the fathers fell asleep, all things continue as they were from the beginning of the creation" (2 Pet. 3:4). Every believer should read often the two closing chapters of the Revelation, and remember that the present creation is to be exchanged, as our next verse in Hebrews tells us. Before the face of the Sitter upon the Great White Throne of final judgment, "The earth and the heaven fled away; and there was found no place for them ... He that sitteth on the throne said, Behold, I am making all things new."


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Bibliography
Newell, William. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". William Newell's Commentary on Romans, Hebrews and Revelation. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wnc/hebrews-1.html. 1938.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

11 They shall perish; but thou remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a garment;

Ver. 11. They shall perish] The visible heavens are defiled with man’s sin, and shall therefore be purged by the last fire, as the vessels that held the sin offering were to pass the fire.

They shall all wax old] {See Trapp on "Romans 8:22"}


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/hebrews-1.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

11.] They (seems most naturally to refer to οί οὐρανοί immediately preceding. There is no reason in the Psalm why the pronoun should not represent both antecedents, the heavens and the earth. Here, however, the subsequent context seems to determine the application to be only to the heavens: for to them only can be referred the following image, ὡσεὶ περιβόλαιον ἑλίξεις αὐτούς) shall perish (as far as concerns their present state, cf. ἀλλαγήσονται below. ἐδήλωσε καὶ τῆς κτίσεως τὴν ἐπὶ τὸ κρεῖττον μεταβολὴν ἀπʼ αὐτοῦ γεννησομένην, αὐτοῦ δὲ τὸ ἄναρχον καὶ ἀνώλεθρον. Thdrt. On this change, see the opinions of the Fathers in Suicer, vol. ii. pp. 151–2, 365, and 520 B), but thou remainest (Bleek prefers the fut. διαμενεῖς, see var. readd., on the ground of the verbs being all future in the Heb. text. But perhaps the consideration alleged by Lünemann, that the Writer, using only the LXX, seems to place σὺ δὲ διαμένεις and σὺ δὲ ὁ αὐτὸς εἶ as parallel clauses, is of more weight than the other. De Wette, on the Ps., renders the Hebrew verbs present: Dieselben vergehen, doch du bestehest. δια μένω, as in reff. and Ps. 118:90, ἐθεμελίωσας τὴν γῆν καὶ διαμένει. The preposition gives the sense of endurance through all changes): and they all shall wax old as a garment (see besides reff. Isaiah 51:6, ἡ δὲ γῆ ὡς ἱμάτιον παλαιωθήσεται: ib. Isaiah 50:9; and Sirach 14:17, πᾶσα σὰρξ ὡς ἱμάτιον παλαιοῦται), and as a mantle ( περιβόλαιον (reff.) is a word of unusual occurrence, found principally in the later classics; but also in Eurip. Herc. Fur. 549, θανάτου περιβόλαιʼ ἀνήμμεθα, and 1269, σαρκὸς περιβόλαια ἡβῶντα. It, as περιβολή, Genesis 49:11, signifies any enveloping, enwrapping garment) shalt thou fold them up (the Heb. here and apparently some copies of the LXX have the same verb as below: תַּחֲלִיפֵם וִיַחֲלֹפוּ,— ἀλλάξεις αὐτοὺς καὶ ἀλλαγήσονται,—“thou shalt change them, and they shall be changed.” See also var. readd. here. LXX-A (not F.), with which (14) (15) agree, reads as our text: and there can be little doubt that the Writer of this Epistle followed that text as usual. Grot. thinks ἑλίξεις has come into the Greek text from ref. Isa., ἑλιγήσεται ὁ οὐρανὸς ὡς βιβλίον. See also ref. Rev.), and they shall be changed (viz. as a mantle is folded up to be put away when a fresh one is about to be put on. Bleek quotes, as illustrating the idea, Philo de Profug. § 20, vol. i. p. 562, ἐνδύεται δὲ ὁ μὲν πρεσβύτατος τοῦ ὄντος λόγος ὡς ἐσθῆτα τὸν κόσμον· γῆν γὰρ καὶ ὓδωρ καὶ ἀέρα καὶ πῦρ κ. τὰ ἐκ τούτων ἐπαμπίσχεται): but Thou art the same (Heb. וְאַתָּה הוּא, “and Thou art He:” viz. He, which Thou hast ever been: cf. Isaiah 46:4 Heb. and E. V. Bleek compares Philo, de Profug. § 11, p. 554: ἥλιος γὰρ οὐκ ἀλλαττόμενος ὁ αὐτός ἐστιν ἀεὶ κ. τ. λ.), and thy years shall not fail (Heb., “Thy years end not,” are never completed: so LXX render the same verb תָּמַם by ἐκλείπειν, Ps. 103:35: 1 Kings 16:11; (4) 2 Kings 7:13, &c.). The account to be given of Psalms 102 seems to be as follows: according to its title it is “a prayer of the afflicted, when he is overwhelmed, and poureth out his complaint before the Lord.” It was probably written during the Babylonian exile (cf. 2 Kings 1:14-15) by one who “waited for the consolation of Israel.” That consolation was to be found only in Israel’s covenant God, and the Messiah Israel’s deliverer. And the trust of Israel in this her Deliverer was ever directed to the comfort of her sons under the immediate trouble of the time, be that what it might. As generations went on, more and more was revealed of the Messiah’s office and work, and the hearts of God’s people entered deeper and deeper into the consolation to be derived from the hope of His coming. Here then we have this sorrowing one casting himself on the mercy of the great Deliverer, and extolling His faithfulness and firmness over, and as distinguished from, all the works of His hands. To apply then these words to the Redeemer, is to use them in their sense of strictest propriety. See Delitzsch’s note, where the whole matter is discussed.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/hebrews-1.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Hebrews 1:11. αὐτοί] refers back not to earth and heaven, Hebrews 1:10, taken together (Kuinoel, Stuart, Bloomfield, Delitzsch, Kurtz), but, as is evident from the following πάντες, and in particular from ἑλίξεις, Hebrews 1:12, only to οἱ οὐρανοί.

ἀπολοῦνται] shall perish. Comp. Isaiah 34:4; Isaiah 51:6; Isaiah 65:17; 2 Peter 3:13; Revelation 20:11; Revelation 21:1.

σὺ δὲ διαμένεις] but Thou abidest for evermore (throughout all duration of time, διά). On account of the environment of futures, and because the future is used here in the Hebrew, Bleek, after the example of Luther, Cornelius a Lapide, Peirce, Bengel, Wetstein, alii, accentuates: διαμενεῖς. So also the Vulgate (permanebis). Hardly in the sense of the author. For, since he employed only the LXX., not the Hebrew original, he surely took σὺ δὲ διαμ. as a parallel member to σὺ δὲ αὐτὸς εἶ, Hebrews 1:12, consequently also construed the former as a present.

ὡς ἱμάτιον παλαιωθήσονται] will grow old like a garment, which by long use is worn out and laid aside, to be replaced by a new and better one. Comp. Isaiah 50:9; Isaiah 51:6; Sirach 14:17.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/hebrews-1.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Hebrews 1:11. αὐτοὶ, they) the earth and heaven.— ἀπολοῦνται, shall perish) There is the same word at Luke 5:37; James 1:11; 1 Peter 1:7; 2 Peter 3:6.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/hebrews-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

They shall perish; the heavens themselves instanced in, as containing the most excellent part of the creation, (such as the Gentile philosophy esteemed incorruptible), are mutable, as by the various changes, not only in the airy part of it, but in the ethereal, doth appear: the glorious lights in it have their spots and rusts, as the sun itself, both increasing and diminishing upon them, and so as to their present, natural frame, are changeable, perishable, and dissolvable, Isaiah 51:6 Matthew 24:35.

But thou remainest; but the Son Jehovah is unchangeable, hath a stedfast being, such as never loseth its state, no term is set for the ending of him. His immutability proves his Deity.

Remainest is an expression of present time, denoting constant abiding. He was before, in, and after all ages immutable, Lamentations 5:19.

Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to-day, and for ever, Hebrews 13:8.

And they all shall wax old as doth a garment: the antiquation of a garment is a metaphor borrowed, to show the corruptibility of the heavens. A garment wears and decayeth with use in tract of time, it changeth its fashion, is another thing as to its matter and form: so will the heavens, as to their form and face, decay, they are gradually coming to an end as to what they are now, 2 Peter 3:7,10.

That which decayeth and waxeth old is ready to vanish away, Hebrews 8:13; so these heavens do.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/hebrews-1.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

11. αὐτοὶ ἀπολοῦνται. Isaiah 34:4, &c.; 2 Peter 3:12; Revelation 21:1.

διαμένεις, “abidest through all times.” This, and not the future διαμενεῖς, is the right reading, for it is parallel to σὺ δὲ ὁ αὐτὸς εἶ. Διαμένειν means to abide through all changes.

ὡσεὶ περιβόλαιον. ὡς ἱμάτιον is a common Scripture metaphor. Isaiah 50:9, &c.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/hebrews-1.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

11. They shall perish—They shall change from one form or system to another, the old form disappearing. Compare Isaiah 34:4; Isaiah 5:6; Isaiah 6:11; 2 Peter 3:12-13; Revelation 20:11. Science assumes matter to be indestructible; higher truth holds it to be in itself phenomenal, and indestructible only as it is sustained by underlying divine power.

Thou remainest—The Greek word expressively means, thou art permanent through; that is, through all the changes of phenomena and systems.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/hebrews-1.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Hebrews 1:11. They all, i.e the heavens and the earth. The language and the imagery are taken largely from Isaiah 34:4; Isaiah 51:6.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/hebrews-1.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

remainest. Greek. diameno. See Galatians 1:2, Galatians 1:5.

wax old. Greek. palaioo. Only here, Hebrews 8:13. Luke 12:33.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/hebrews-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

They shall perish; but thou remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a garment;

They. The earth and the heavens in their present form "shall perish" (Hebrews 12:26-27): not annihilation; as in the case of "the world that ... being over-flowed with water, perished" (2 Peter 3:6). The covenant of the possession of the earth was renewed with Noah and his seed on the renovated earth. So it shall be after the perishing by fire (2 Peter 3:12-13).

Remainest - through [ diameneis (Greek #1265)] all changes.

As doth a garment (Isaiah 51:6).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/hebrews-1.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

But you will remain. "Although the material creation seems so SOLID yet it will disappear, but You will still be there!!!"


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/hebrews-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(11) And they all . . .—Both the earth and the heavens: see Isaiah 34:4, “The heavens shall be rolled together as a scroll;” and Isaiah 51:6, “The earth shall wax old like a garment.”


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/hebrews-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

They shall perish; but thou remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a garment;
shall perish
12:27; Isaiah 34:4; 65:17; Matthew 24:35; Mark 13:31; Luke 21:33; 2 Peter 3:7-10; Revelation 20:11; 21:1
thou
Psalms 10:16; 29:10; 90:2; Isaiah 41:4; 44:6; Revelation 1:11,17,18; 2:8
shall wax
Isaiah 50:9; 51:6,8

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/hebrews-1.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

The main subject of this epistle is the superiority of Christ over all other persons or things (except his Father). The works of creation, in the making of which He had a part, will cease to be even though He will continue. They means the things of creation mentioned in the preceding verse. Wax old as doth a garment is an illustration drawn from a garment that has reached the end of its usefulness. When a garment gets into that condition, it is discarded and treated as the next verse states.


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Bibliography
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/hebrews-1.html. 1952.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans

They shall perish; but thou remainest: and they all shall wax old as doth a garment.

They shall perish.—However glorious the work of creation, the heavens and earth shall perish. They are, so to speak, the scaffolding for the erection of a more glorious fabric.

2 Peter 3:10-13. Here we may apply the Apostle's reasoning,—"Howbeit that was not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural; and afterward that which is spiritual." 1 Corinthians 15:46. So the visible heavens and earth are intended to introduce the new creation,—"And I saw a new heaven and a new earth: for the first heaven and the first earth were passed away; and there was no more sea. And I John saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. And I heard a great voice out of heaven saying, Behold, the tabernacle of God is with men, and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with them, and be their God. And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away. And he that sat upon the throne said, Behold, I make all things new. And he said unto me, "Write: for these words are true and faithful." Revelation 21:1-5. The heavens and the earth shall be changed; but Hebrews , the Messiah, remains; He is the same yesterday, today, and for ever.

They all shall wax old as doth a garment.— As a garment becomes unfit for being worn, so shall they wax old.


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Bibliography
Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Hebrews 1:11". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/hebrews-1.html. 1835.

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