Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Hebrews 10:12

but He, having offered one sacrifice for sins for all time, sat down at the right hand of God ,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Atonement;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Law;   Offerings;   Types;   The Topic Concordance - Jesus Christ;   Justification;   Law;   Obedience;   Reconciliation;   Righteousness;   Sacrifice;   Sanctification;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Ascension of Christ, the;   Atonement, the;   Christ, the High Priest;   High Priest, the;   Law of Moses, the;   Priests;   Sacrifices;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Abihu;   Law;   Testament;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Consecration;   Day of atonement;   Enemy;   Jesus christ;   Leviticus;   Priest;   Sacrifice;   Type, typology;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - God;   Sanctification;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Atonement;   Covenant;   Peace;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Priest;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Atonement, Day of;   Hebrews, the Epistle to the;   High Priest;   Lord's Supper;   Sacrifice;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Atonement;   Forgiveness;   Gestures;   Hebrews;   Reconcilation;   Scapegoat;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ascension;   Atonement;   Sanctification, Sanctify;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Ascension;   Ascension (2);   Guilt (2);   Hebrews Epistle to the;   Justification;   King;   Mediator;   Obedience (2);   Priest;   Priest (2);   Propitiation (2);   Psalms (2);   Sacrifice;   Session;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Atonement, Day of;   Offering, Offering up;   Sacrifice;   Type;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Christ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Law;   Lord (2);   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Atonement;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Melchizedek;   Priesthood, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Accommodation;   Ascension;   Christ, the Exaltation of;   For;   Intercession of Christ;   Priest;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Atonement;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for November 23;   Every Day Light - Devotion for November 26;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

But this man - The Lord Jesus. The word “man” is not in the original here. The Greek is literally “but this;” to wit, this priest. The apostle does not state here whether he was a man, or a being of a higher order. He merely mentions him as a priest in contradistinction from the Jewish priests.

After he had offered one sacrifice for sins - By dying on the cross. This he did but once; this could not be repeated; and need not be repeated, for it was sufficient for the sins of the world.

For ever sat down - That is, he sat down then to return no more for the purpose of offering sacrifice for sin. He will no more submit himself to scenes of suffering and death to expiate human guilt.

On the right hand of God - see the notes on Mark 16:19; compare the notes on Ephesians 1:20-22.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/hebrews-10.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

But this man,.... Jesus Christ, for he is a man, though not a mere man; or this great high priest, who came to do the will of God, and whose body was offered once for all:

after he had offered one sacrifice for sins; the sacrifice of himself, body and soul, and this but once:

for ever sat down on the right hand of God; as having done his work effectually, and that with acceptance; and therefore is placed as a token of honour at the right hand of God, where he sits enjoying rest, ease, and pleasure, and that for ever; all which is opposed to the priests under the law; they were many, he but one; they offered many sacrifices, he but one; they offered theirs often, every day, he but once; they stood ministering, he sat down; his sacrifice being effectual to take away sin, when theirs was not.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/hebrews-10.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

this man — emphatic (Hebrews 3:3).

for ever — joined in English Version with “offered one sacrifice”; offered one sacrifice, the efficacy of which endures for ever; literally. “continuously,” (compare Hebrews 10:14). “The offering of Christ, once for all made, will continue the one and only oblation for ever; no other will supersede it” [Bengel]. The mass, which professes to be the frequent repetition of one and the same sacrifice of Christ‘s body, is hence disproved. For not only is Christ‘s body one, but also His offering is one, and that inseparable from His suffering (Hebrews 9:26). The mass would be much the same as the Jewish sacrifices which Paul sets aside as abrogated, for they were anticipations of the one sacrifice, just as Rome makes masses continuations of it, in opposition to Paul‘s argument. A repetition would imply that the former once-for-all offering of the one sacrifice was imperfect, and so would be dishonoring to it (Hebrews 10:2, Hebrews 10:18). Hebrews 10:14, on the contrary, says, “He hath PERFECTED FOR EVER them that are sanctified.” If Christ offered Himself at the last supper, then He offered Himself again on the cross, and there would be two offerings; but Paul says there was only one, once for all. Compare Note, see on Hebrews 9:26. English Version is favored by the usage in this Epistle, of putting the Greek “for ever” after that which it qualifies. Also, “one sacrifice for ever,” stands in contrast to “the same sacrifices oftentimes” (Hebrews 10:11). Also, 1 Corinthians 15:25, 1 Corinthians 15:28, agrees with Hebrews 10:12, Hebrews 10:13, taken as English Version, not joining, as Alford does, “for ever” with “sat down,” for Jesus is to give up the mediatorial throne “when all things shall be subdued unto Him,” and not to sit on it for ever.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/hebrews-10.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

When he had offered (προσενεγκαςprosenegkas). Second aorist active participle (with first aorist ending -αςas in place of -ονon) of προσπερωprospherō single act in contrast to present participle προσπερωνprospherōn above.

One sacrifice (μιαν τυσιανmian thusian). This the main point. The one sacrifice does the work that the many failed to do. One wonders how priests who claim that the “mass” is the sacrifice of Christ‘s body repeated explain this verse.

For ever
(εις το διηνεκεςeis to diēnekes). Can be construed either with μιαν τυσιανmian thusian or with εκατισενekathisen (sat down). See Hebrews 1:3 for εκατισενekathisen f0).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/hebrews-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Forever ( εἰς τὸ διηνεκὲς )

Const. with offered. The reason appears in Hebrews 10:14. It is according to the usage of the epistle to place this phrase after that which it qualifies. Thus one sacrifice forever is contrasted with the same sacrifices often. This agrees also with what follows. He offered one sacrifice forever, and then sat down, awaiting its eternal result.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/hebrews-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God;

But he — The virtue of whose one sacrifice remains for ever.

Sat down — As a son, in majesty and honour.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/hebrews-10.html. 1765.

William Newell's Commentary on Romans, Hebrews and Revelation

But He when He had offered one sacrifice for sins forever, sat down on the right hand of God--It is offering up once for all that is of eternal consequence. It is important to translate this central verse as do both the King James and the Revised Version, that is, the Greek words meaning "for ever" (eis to dienekes), are to be taken with the preceding verb, "offered," rather than with the following verb, "sat down."

But on the other hand, if we allow the phrase translated "for ever" to modify offered one sacrifice, and read offered one sacrifice for ever, all is clear. (We have in this tenth chapter three of the four occurrences in N.T. of this remarkable phrase, eis to dienekes: vss. 1, 12, 14. The fourth in Ch. 7:3.)

Christ sat down on the right hand of God. Why? Read godly Andrew Murray's note (and others), quoted below; and mark its spiritual understanding:

By One offering He hath perfected forever them that are sanctified (vs. 14). The once of Christ's work is the secret of its being forever: the more clear the acceptance of that Divine once-for-all, the more sure the experience of that Divine forever, the continually abiding working of the power of the endless life.

"Once and forever: see how the two go together in the work of Christ in its two principal manifestations. In His death, His sacrifice, His bloodshedding, it is once for all. The propitiation for sin, the bearing and the putting away of it, was so complete that of His suffering again, or offering Himself again, there can never be any thought. God now remembers the sin no more forever."--Murray.

"The sacrifice was efficacious forever, through all time, being appropriated by each believer (vs. 14). The connection of eis to dienekes with the following ekathisen (forever sat down), is contrary to the usage of the Epistle; it obscures the idea of the perpetual efficacy of Christ's one sacrifice; it weakens the contrast with esteken; and it imports a foreign idea into the image of the assumption (ekathisen) of royal dignity by Christ.--Westcott.

"'Forever'; construe with 'offered'. The reason appears in vs. 14. It is according to the age of the epistle to place this phrase after that which it qualifies. Thus one sacrifice forever is contrasted with the same sacrifices often. This agrees also with what follows. He offered one sacrifice forever, and then sat down awaiting its eternal result."--Vincent

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Newell, William. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". William Newell's Commentary on Romans, Hebrews and Revelation. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wnc/hebrews-10.html. 1938.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

12 But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God;

Ver. 12. But this man] Opposed to the plurality of Levitical priests. One sacrifice, and once for ever, not many and often, as they. And he sat down, when as they stood daily offering oftentimes. Note the antithesis, and Christ’s precellency.

On the right hand of God] Which he could not have done if he had not expiated our sins. John 16:10, "Of righteousness, because I go to my Father." He could not have gone to his Father if he had not first fulfilled all righteousness, and fully acquitted us of all our iniquities.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/hebrews-10.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Hebrews 10:12

The Lessons of the Cross.

Our Lord's suffering is also

I. Our example. How powerful the force of that teaching has been; how deep it has sunk into human nature's heart. Here is He who was man, and yet was God. As God He could not die, but He stooped to death in the inferior nature. There is no limit to the force of this example. He has burst the gap through the gloomy barrier that fenced in the human life; He has let in light where all was dark before. His footsteps shine before us on the way, and the more rugged and painful the ground, the more firmly are they printed, the more deeply traceable.

II. But, again, the death of Christ witnesses to truth. All prophecy and its fulfilment, all teaching and its verification in the life of man, is less convincing than the tale of the cross. It proves to us the truth in practice, that the will of God is the law and life to man. Life eternal is our object, and therefore suffering is our business.

III. The cross of Christ is our greatest lesson in moral teaching. It teaches us under this head, (1) the immense value of our souls, and (2) the heinousness of sin as the bane and scourge of those souls.

IV. And, lastly, it is our bond of union. He died to gather together in one the Church of God which is scattered abroad, to become the Good Shepherd of those far-off sheep, to bring them home to Him and to each other. The Church of God is the result, imperfect, scantily realised, and in idea so wide and so prominent, so historically grand, so socially vast, that its failure—so far as it has failed—is forced into prominence which meaner things could not reach. But the Church of God in its imperfections does but sum up and contain the total of the shortcomings of its members. They are Christ's members still; He counts them as such, and we may count them as such.

H. Hayman, Rugby Sermons, p. 214.


I. There is an exceeding grandeur—approaching to awe—about everything which can be done only once. This is a great part of the grandeur of death, and of the judgment in their nature, they can be only once. And the atonement is the more grand because it is of the same character. The cross is magnificently fearful in its perfect isolation. Everything in religious truth, which went before it in ages past, looked on to it. Everything in religious truth which has ever followed, and in ages yet to come, looks back to it. It is the bud of all, the beginning of all, the sum of all.

I. We make sacrifices, and what are they? If we think, in any sense whatever, to offer up anything in the slightest degree propitiatory for sin, we plainly violate the whole Bible. We offer three things: our praises, our duties, and ourselves. These are our only sacrifices. And what makes these things sacrifices? The Christ that is in them. So that still, be we of the Jewish or the Christian dispensation, the same thing is true—there is "one sacrifice for sins for ever."

II. Remember, that marvellous as is the region of the thought in which we are walking when we treat of the atonement, it is all in accordance with the most perfect sense of our understanding, and all lies within the strictest limit of perfect justice; nay, its foundation is justice, and it commends itself to every man's judgment as soon as he sees it. But such a view as a prospective forgiveness of future sin would violate every principle of common sense. Holiness is the great end of the cross. Pardon, peace, salvation, happiness, are only means—means to holiness; holiness, which is the image of God, which is the glory of God. Beware of any approach to any view of Christ which does not directly tend to personal holiness. For He perfects—whom? Them that are sanctified.

J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 5th series, p. 138.


References: Hebrews 10:12.—Clergyman's Magazine, vol. x., p. 230. Hebrews 10:12, Hebrews 10:13.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. ii., No. 91.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/hebrews-10.html.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

12.] but He (‘this (man),’ or, (priest): but such rendering should be avoided if possible, as should all renderings which import a new generic idea into the text, as always causing confusion: cf. for a notable example, 1 Corinthians 2:11 end in E. V.) having offered one sacrifice for sins (on the punctuation, see below) for ever ( εἰς τὸ διηνεκές may be joined either with the preceding or with the following words. If with the preceding, as Thl. ( θυσίανεἰς τὸ δ. ἀρκοῦσαν ἡμῖν, and so Œc.), Luther, Castellio, Beza b, Chr. F. Schmid, Bengel, Böhme, Stein, al., we observe the usage of the Epistle, which is to place εἰς τὸ διηνεκές after that which it qualifies (reff.): we have μία θυσία εἰς τὸ διηνεκές opposed to τὰς αὐτὰς θυσίας πολλάκις; and we keep the propriety of the sense, according to what follows, τὸ λοιπὸν ἐκδεχόμενος ἕως κ. τ. λ., and according to 1 Corinthians 15:28, where we are expressly told, that the session of our triumphant Saviour will have its end as such. If we join the words with the following, as Syr., D-lat., Faber Stap., Erasm., Calvin, Schlichting, Grot., Wolf, al., Schulz, De Wette, Bleek, Lünem., Ebrard, Hofmann, Delitzsch, al., we more thoroughly satisfy the construction, in which εἰς τὸ διηνεκές seems to refer better to an enduring state than to a past act, or at all events not to this last without a harsh ellipsis, “having offered one sacrifice (the virtue of which will endure) for ever:” we preserve the contrast between ἕστηκεν καθʼ ἡμέραν and εἰς τὸ διηνεκὲς ἐκάθισεν: we preserve also the balance between the clauses ending προσφέρων θυσίας, and προσενέγκας θυσίαν: and we are in full accordance with the ἱερεὺς εἰς τὸν αἰῶνα so often insisted on. And to this latter arrangement I incline, not however laying it down as certain. The objection taken above, as to the change in the nature of Christ’s session at the end, when all things shall have been put under His feet, may be met by saying that such change, being obviously included in His ultimate state of reception into God’s presence in heaven, does not here count as a change, where the question is of renewal of sacrifice, with regard to which that session is eternal) sat down on the right hand of God,

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/hebrews-10.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Hebrews 10:12. οὗτος] comp. Hebrews 3:3.

εἰς τὸ διηνεκές] belongs to ἐκάθισεν.

With that which precedes is it conjoined by Oecumenius, Theophylact, Luther, Bengel, Böhme, Stein, Ewald, and others; whereby, however, the manifest antithesis, which εἰς τὸ διηνεκὲς ἐκάθισεν forms to ἕστηκεν καθʼ ἡμέραν, Hebrews 10:11, is destroyed, and the symmetry of the proposition, Hebrews 10:12, is lost.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/hebrews-10.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Hebrews 10:12. (61) οὓτος) So ch. Hebrews 3:3. Others read αὐτὸς by an easy alliteration.(62)΄ίαν, one) The antithesis is, the same sacrifices often, Hebrews 10:11.— εἰς τὸ διηνεκὲς, continually) The offering of Christ, once for all made, will continue the one and only oblation for ever: no other will supersede it.— ἐκάθισεν, sat down) The antithesis is ἕστηκε, is wont to stand or standeth, Hebrews 10:11. The sacrifice of the mass is inconsistent with sitting at the right hand of GOD: for the sacrifice of Christ is neither continued nor repeated in the mass. The apostle not only urges the identity, but also the word ἅπαξ, once, once for all, concerning the sacrifice of Christ, in antithesis to the Levitical sacrifices, often offered, although they were the same. A sacrifice which is often repeated, although it be the same, does not satisfy or make atonement to GOD. Not only is the body of Christ one, but also His offering is one, and that too inseparable from His passion: ch. Hebrews 9:26. Every later oblation shows that the former is of no value; every former one proves that the later one is superfluous: ch. Hebrews 10:2; Hebrews 10:18.

ACD( δ) corrected f Vulg. read οὗτος: and so Lachm. Tisch., with no good authority, reads αὐτὸς, as Rec. Text.—ED.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/hebrews-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins: opposed to the legal priests is this Priest, God-man, an almighty Minister, having once offered, and no more, one sacrifice of his body for the sins of others, (he had none of his own, as every other priest had), that they might be pardoned and remembered no more, it being of eternal virtue and efficacy.

For ever must be joined to the sacrifice to complete the opposition, Hebrews 10:11. The legal one could never take away sins, but his one sacrifice could take them away for ever.

Sat down on the right hand of God; he ceased from sacrificing any more, and ascended up to heaven, and there he sat himself down (having abolished sin, and finished his work as a servant for ever) in the highest place of dominion and power at God’s right hand, while the Aaronites stood trembling and waiting at God’s foot-stool: and thence he powerfully and efficaciously commands the blotting out of sins, applieth his merits, and dispenseth to his servants the covenant mercies which he purchased by his own blood for them, Hebrews 1:3 2:9 8:2.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/hebrews-10.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

This man; Christ.

On the right hand of God; in an exalted state of glory, which is evidence that his atonement once for all is accepted, and is efficacious in securing the salvation of all who believe.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/hebrews-10.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Hebrews 10:12. But he (this Priest) having offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, took his seat on the right hand of God, an evidence of the completeness of His work, which left no room for another sacrifice or for the repetition of His own. His priesthood indeed continues, and the presentation of His sacrifice—‘the perpetual oblation;’ but His atoning work is over. ‘For ever,’ in perpetuity, uninterruptedly, may be connected with ‘took His seat,’ but the usage of this Epistle is to connect it with the words that precede, Hebrews 7:3, Hebrews 10:1.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/hebrews-10.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Man = Priest.

after He had = having.

for ever = continually. App-151. Compare Hebrews 10:1. In Authorized Version from 1611 to 1630 the comma was placed after "ever". But in 1638 it was removed to after "sins", thus going back to the punctuation of the Bishops" Bible of 1568. The Greek expression is not the usual one, eis ton aiona, but as verses: Hebrews 10:1, Hebrews 10:14, Hebrews 10:3 eis to dienekes (App-151. H), and means "continually", in distinction from "interruptedly". It is not concerned with the offering of sacrifice, but with His having sat down. So that it does not contradict Hebrews 9:28.

on. Greek. en. App-104.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/hebrews-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God;

This man - emphatic (Hebrews 3:3).

Forever - join with "offered one sacrifice;" namely, the efficacy of which endures forever [ eis (Greek #1519) to (Greek #3588) dieenekes (Greek #1336): continuously] (cf. Hebrews 10:14). The mass, which professes to be the frequent repetition of one and the same sacrifice of Christ's body, is hence disproved. For not only is Christ's body one, but also His offering is one, and past [ prosenengkas (Greek #4374): aorist, not action continued down to the present, as the perfect], and inseparable from His suffering (Hebrews 9:26). The mass is as opposed to Paul's view of Christ's ONE finished sacrifice, as the Jewish sacrifices would be now. A repetition would imply that the once for-all offering was imperfect, and so would be dishonouring to it (Hebrews 10:2; Hebrews 10:18). Hebrews 10:14, on the contrary, says, "He hath PERFECTED FOREVER them that are sanctified." If Christ offered Himself at the last supper, then He offered Himself again on the cross, and there would be two offerings; but Paul says there was only one, once for all (note, Hebrews 9:26). Usage in this letter puts [ eis (Greek #1519) to (Greek #3588) dieenekes (Greek #1336)] "forever" after, not before, that which it qualifies (Hebrews 10:1; Hebrews 10:14; Hebrews 7:3).

Also, "one sacrifice ... forever," stands in contrast to "oftentimes the same sacrifices" (Hebrews 10:11). Also, 1 Corinthians 15:23-25; 1 Corinthians 15:28, agrees with Hebrews 10:12-13; not joining, as Alford, "forever" with "sat down;" for Jesus is to give up the Mediatorial throne 'when all things shall be subdued unto Him,' and not to sit on it forever. Leviticus 16:17 (cf. Hebrews 4:13-16 ) shows that on the day of atonement none but the high priest could offer a sin offering for the people, until he came out of the Holiest, having finished his? Christ, our High Priest, having gone within the heavenly veil, and not yet come out, precludes any other from priestly ministry during our whole dispensation, which is our day of atonement and year of jubilee (Leviticus 25:9). His ascension into heaven is necessary to His priesthood: 'if on earth, He would not be a priest;' much less are His disciples (Hebrews 8:4).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/hebrews-10.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(12) But this man.—Rather, but He. In the main this verse is a combination of Hebrews 7:27 (Hebrews 9:26) and Hebrews 8:1. One addition is made, in the words, “for ever.” These words (which occur in three other places, Hebrews 7:3; Hebrews 10:1; Hebrews 10:14) are by many joined with what precedes, by others with the latter part of the sentence, “it down on the right hand of God.” The different editions of our Bible and Prayer Book (Epistle for Good Friday) are divided, some (including the earliest) having a comma at the word “ever,” others at “sins.” In most of our earlier English versions the construction adopted was shown by the arrangement of the words. Thus Tyndale has, “sat him down for ever;” and the Bishops’ Bible, “is set down for ever.” Coverdale (following Luther) is very clear on the other side: “when He had offered for sins one sacrifice which is of value for ever.” Most modern commentators seem to adopt the latter view (“for ever sat down”), but hardly, perhaps, with sufficient reason. The analogy of Hebrews 10:14 is distinctly on the other side; and the Greek phrase rendered “for ever” is more suitably applied to the offering of a sacrifice than to the thought of the following words. The contrast to Hebrews 10:11 is strongly marked. The sacrificial work has been performed, and the High Priest no longer “standeth ministering.” The words “sat down” (Psalms 110:1) add to the priestly imagery that of kingly state.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/hebrews-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God;
1:3; 8:1; 9:12; Acts 2:33,34; Romans 8:34; Colossians 3:1
Reciprocal: Leviticus 4:31 - a sweet;  Leviticus 8:34 - GeneralLeviticus 15:14 - GeneralNumbers 29:13 - thirteen young bullocks;  Psalm 110:1 - until;  Zechariah 6:12 - behold;  Zechariah 6:13 - a priest;  Matthew 22:44 - The Lord;  Mark 12:36 - The Lord;  Mark 16:19 - he was;  Romans 4:25 - and was raised;  Romans 6:9 - Christ;  1 Corinthians 15:3 - Christ;  1 Corinthians 15:25 - General1 Corinthians 15:27 - GeneralEphesians 1:20 - and set;  Ephesians 5:2 - a sacrifice;  Colossians 1:14 - whom;  Hebrews 1:13 - Sit;  Hebrews 4:10 - he that;  Hebrews 4:14 - that is;  Hebrews 9:26 - the sacrifice;  Hebrews 10:10 - the offering;  1 Peter 3:22 - is on

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/hebrews-10.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

This man refers to Christ, and forever means His sacrifice would be permanent and would not have to be repeated as did those of the old law.

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Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/hebrews-10.html. 1952.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Hebrews 10:12

"But this Prayer of Manasseh, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God." Hebrews 10:12

It is a fundamental article of our most holy faith, that the man Christ Jesus is now at God"s right hand, a very Prayer of Manasseh, not a shadowy, ethereal substance. "There is one God, and one Mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus." God looks at him as such with eyes of intense delight, with ever new approbation and love; and views him as the representative of all that are savingly interested in him; he being the Head, the Church the members; he the Bridegroom, the Church the bride; he the great High Priest, and the Church the house of God. As living for her at the right hand of the Father, he is ever presenting on her behalf the validity of his intercession. The fact, the reality that he is there, is the Church"s joy, as it is all her hope and all her boast. "Because I live, you shall live also."

To him, then, do we direct our prayers; on his glorious Person we fix our believing eyes; upon his blood we hang our hope; under his righteousness we ever desire to shelter; to feel his presence, taste his grace, experience his love, and know his power, is what our soul, under divine teaching, is ever longing for. See, then, the grounds of holy boldness for a poor sinner to enter into the holiest. Blood has been shed, which blood has the validity of Godhead stamped upon it. A new and living way has been consecrated, in which a living soul may walk. A great High Priest is set over the house of God, who is ever presenting the merits of his intercession. Thus, those who feel their need of him, who cannot live, and dare not die without him, whose eyes are upon him and hearts towards him, are encouraged to enter with all holy boldness into the holiest, that they may have communion with Father, Song of Solomon, and Holy Spirit.

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Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/hebrews-10.html.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews

But this Prayer of Manasseh, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins, for ever sat down on the right hand of God.

But this priest, having offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God. Christ having sat down at the right hand of God, is repeatedly mentioned by the Apostle. Chap; 8:1; 12:2. This is the fulfilment of the110th Psalm, previously quoted, "The Lord said to my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, till I make thine enemies thy footstool." Christ sitting down at the right hand of God, after having offered His atoning sacrifice, demonstrated its perfection. The Jewish priests stood while fulfilling their service. It would have been death for the high priest to have sat down within the vail; but our great High Priest having humbled Himself, and become obedient to death, even the death of the cross, and thus redeemed His people from the curse of the law, by being made a curse for them, ascended up far above all heavens, and sat down at the right hand of God, angels, principalities, and powers being made subject to Him.

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Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/hebrews-10.html. 1835.

The Bible Study New Testament

12. Christ, however. “Notice the contrast!” Offered one sacrifice. “Not many times!” That is good forever. “What Christ DID will never be terminated or superseded!” And then sat down. “The Jewish priest stands and performs his service every day. Christ offered one sacrifice and sat down. The completeness of Christ’s ONE SACRIFICE is proved by the fact that he did sit down and now sits at God’s right side.”

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Hebrews 10:12". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/hebrews-10.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.