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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Hebrews 12:13

and make straight paths for your feet, so that the limb which is lame may not be put out of joint, but rather be healed.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Make straight paths for your feet - That is, Take the straight path that is before you, do not go in crooked or rough ways, where are stones, briers, and thorns, by which you will be inevitably lamed, and so totally prevented from proceeding in the way; whereas, if you go in the even, proper path, though you have been wounded by getting into a wrong way, that which was wounded will be healed by moderate, equal exercise, all impediments being removed. The application of all this to a correct, holy deportment in religious life, is both natural and easy.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/hebrews-12.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And make straight paths for your feet - Margin, “even.” The word used here means properly straight, in the sense of upright, erect; Acts 14:10; but it is used here in the sense of straight horizontally, that is, level, plain, smooth. The meaning is, that they were to remove all obstacles out of the way, so that they need not stumble and fail. There is probably an allusion here to Proverbs 4:25-27. “Let thine eyes look right on, and let thine eyelids look straight before thee. Ponder the path of thy feet, and let all thy ways be established. Turn not to the right hand nor to the left; remove thy foot from evil.” The idea is, that by every proper means they were to make the way to heaven as plain and easy as possible. They were to allow no obstructions in the path over which the lame and feeble might fall.

Lest that which is lame be turned out of the way - A lame man needs a smooth path to walk in. The idea is here, that everything which would prevent those in the church who were in any danger of falling - the feeble, the unestablished, the weak - from walking in the path to heaven, or which might be an occasion to them of falling, should be removed. Or it may mean, that in a road that was not level, those who were lame would be in danger of spraining, distorting, or wrenching a lame limb; and the counsel is, that whatever would have a tendency to this should be removed. Divested of the figure, the passage means, that everything should be removed which would hinder anyone from walking in the path to life.

But let it rather be healed - As in the case of lameness, pains should be taken to heal it rather than to suffer it to be increased by careless exposure to a new sprain or fracture, so it should be in our religious and moral character. Whatever is defective we should endeavor to restore to soundness, rather than to suffer the defect to be increased. Whatever is feeble in our faith or hope; whatever evil tendency there is in our hearts, we should endeavor to strengthen and amend, lest it should become worse, and we should entirely fall.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/hebrews-12.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And make straight paths for your feet,.... By "feet" are meant the walk and conversation of the saints, both in the church, and in the world, Song of Solomon 7:1 and there are paths made ready for these feet to walk in; as the good old paths of truth, of the word and worship of God, of faith and holiness: and to make these paths "straight", is to make the word of God the rule of walking; to avoid carefully joining anything with it as a rule; to attend constantly on the ordinances of Christ; to go on evenly in a way of believing on him; to walk in some measure worthy of the calling wherewith we are called, and by way of example to others.

Lest that which is lame be turned out of the way; a lame member, as the Syriac version, a lame member of the body of Christ, the church; or a lame person, as the Arabic version, a weak believer; one that is ready to halt, either through the corruption of nature, or through the weakness of grace, or through want of light and judgment, and through instability and inconstancy; lest such an one should, through the irregular walk and conversation of others, be stumbled and offended, and go out of the way, and leave the paths of righteousness and truth. God takes care of, and has a regard to such, and he would have others also, Micah 4:6. The Ethiopic version reads, "that your halting may be healed, and not offended": that you yourselves may not halt and stumble.

But let it rather be healed; the fallen believer be restored, the weak brother be confirmed, the halting professor be strengthened, and everyone be built up and established upon the most holy faith, and in the pure ways of the Gospel.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/hebrews-12.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And make e straight paths for your feet, lest that which is lame be turned out of the way; but let it rather be healed.

(e) Keep a right course, and so, that you show examples of good life for others to follow.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/hebrews-12.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Quoted from Proverbs 4:26, Septuagint, “Make straight paths for thy feet.”

straight — that is, leading by a straight road to joy and grace (Hebrews 12:1, Hebrews 12:2, Hebrews 12:15). Cease to “halt” between Judaism and Christianity [Bengel].

paths — literally, “wheel tracks.” Let your walk be so firm and so unanimous in the right direction that a plain track and “highway” may be thereby established for those who accompany and follow you, to perceive and walk in (Isaiah 35:8) [Alford].

that which is lame — those “weak in the faith” (Romans 14:1), having still Judaizing prejudices.

be turned out of the way — (Proverbs 4:27); and, so missing the way, lose the prize of “the race” (Hebrews 12:1).

rather he healed — Proper exercise of itself contributes to health; the habit of walking straight onward in the right way tends to healing.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/hebrews-12.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Straight paths (τροχιας ορταςtrochias orthas). Track of a wheel (τροχοςtrochos James 3:6 from τρεχωtrechō to run), here only in N.T. “Straight (ορταςorthas) wheel tracks.”

Be not turned out of the way (ινα μη εκτραπηιhina mē ektrapēi). Negative final clause with ινα μηhina mē and second aorist passive of εκτρεπωektrepō old verb to turn out, to twist, to put out of joint. So 1 Timothy 1:6. Vivid picture of concern for the lame (χωλονchōlon as in Matthew 11:5). Graphic picture of concern for the weak, a good argument for prohibition also.


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/hebrews-12.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Make straight paths for your feet ( τροχιὰς ὀρθὰς ποιεῖτε τοῖς ποσὶν ὑμῶν )

After the lxx of Proverbs 4:26. The corresponding Hebrew means to tear, to cut into: hence to cut through as a path; to make firm or plain. Ὁρθός N.T. Only here and Acts 14:10; commonly straight or upright, but also right, safe, happy. Comp. Proverbs 8:6; Proverbs 15:14; Proverbs 21:8. here, not in the sense of straight as distinguished from crooked, but more generally, right, plain, by implication even or smooth. Τροχιά N.T.ois literally a wheel-track ( τροχός awheel ). Very rare in profane Greek. Τοῖς ποσὶν ὑμῶν for your feet,” not with. That is, exert yourselves to make the course clear for yourselves and your fellow Christians, so that there be no stumbling and laming.

That which is lame ( τὸ χωλὸν )

Χωλός lamehalting, only in Synoptic Gospels and Acts. Mostly in the literal sense. Proverbial in Isaiah 33:23. Metaphorically here, and partly Matthew 18:8; Mark 9:45. The verb χωλαίνειν tobe lame or to make lame (not in N.T.) is used metaphorically in lxx, Psalm 18:45; 1 Kings 18:21, where the A.V. “how long halt ye between two opinions” is ἕως πότε ὐμεῖς χωλανεῖτε ἐπ ' ἀμφοτέραις ταῖς ἰγνύαις howlong do ye go lame on both your hams? Τὸ χωλὸν here signifies the lame part or limb.

Be turned out of the way ( ἐκτραπῇ )

Rend. “be put out of joint.” The A.V. is according to the more usual meaning of the verb, which, in N.T., is confined, with this exception, to the Pastoral Epistles. See 1 Timothy 1:6; 1 Timothy 5:15; 2 Timothy 4:4. lxx only Amos 5:8. But it is also used by medical writers in the passive, with the meaning to be wrenched or dislocated. There is nothing strange in the use of this word in a medical sense by our writer, whose work bears the stamp of Alexandria. The Greeks received their knowledge of surgery from the Egyptians, and mural paintings and documents, and even hieroglyphic symbols, prove that that people had attained remarkable proficiency in the science. Herodotus (ch. iii. 131) mentions a medical school at Cyrene in Africa, and says that the pupils of that school were regarded as the second best physicians in all Greece. At the time of Galen (163 a.d.) the medical school of Alexandria was the most famous in the world, and Galen himself studied there. Celsus (first half of the first century a.d.), in the 7th book of his treatise De Artibius, treats of surgical operations according to the views of the Alexandrian schools. The commonly accepted rendering of the A.V., besides giving a conception which is very tame, presents two incongruities: the association of going astray with lameness, and of healing with straying. The other rendering gives a lively and consistent image. Make the paths smooth and even, so that the lame limb be not dislocated by stones or pitfalls. Do everything to avoid aggravating the weakness of a fellow-Christian. Rather try to heal it. Τὸ χωλὸν may refer either to an individual or to a section of the church which is weak and vacillating.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/hebrews-12.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And make straight paths for your feet, lest that which is lame be turned out of the way; but let it rather be healed.

And make straight paths both for your own and for their feet - Remove every hinderance, every offence.

That the lame — They who are weak, scarce able to walk.

Be not turned out of the way — Of faith and holiness.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/hebrews-12.html. 1765.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Perhaps from Hebrews 12:13; Proverbs 4:26. The idea is, Adhere firmly to the strict rules of duty; if any deviation is allowed, it may prove a fatal snare to human frailty.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/hebrews-12.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

13.And make straight paths, etc. He has been hitherto teaching us to lean on God’s consolations, so that we may be bold and strenuous in doing what is right, as his help is our only support; he now adds to this another thing, even that we ought to walk prudently and to keep to a straight course; for indiscreet ardor is no less an evil than inactivity and softness. At the same time this straightness of the way which he recommends, is preserved when a man’s mind is superior to every fear, and regards only what God approves; for fear is ever very ingenious in finding out byways. As then we seek circuitous courses, when entangled by sinful fear; so on the other hand every one who has prepared himself to endure evils, goes on in a straight way wheresoever the Lord calls him, and turns not either to the right hand or to the left. In short, he prescribes to us this rule for our conduct, — that we are to guide our steps according to God’s will, so that neither fear nor the allurements of the world, nor any other things, may draw us away from it. (253)

Hence be adds, Lest that which is lame be turned out of the way, or, lest halting should go astray; that is, lest by halting ye should at length depart far from the way. He calls it halting, when men’s minds fluctuate, and they devote not themselves sincerely to God. So spoke Elijah to the double­minded who blended their own superstitions with God’s worship, “How long halt ye between two opinions?” (1 Kings 18:21.) And it is a befitting way of speaking, for it is a worse thing to go astray than to halt. Nor they who begin to halt do not immediately turn from the right way, but by degrees depart from it more and more, until having been led into a diverse path so they remain entangled in the midst of Satan’s labyrinth. Hence the apostle warns us to strive for the removal of this halting in due time; for if we give way to it, it will at length turn us far away from God.

The words may indeed be rendered, “Lest halting should grow worse,” or turn aside; but the meaning would remain the same; for what the Apostle intimates is, that those who keep not a straight course, but gradually though carelessly turn here and there, become eventually wholly alienated from God. (254)


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/hebrews-12.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

13 And make straight paths for your feet, lest that which is lame be turned out of the way; but let it rather be healed.

Ver. 13. Make straight paths] Seek not byways (those highways to hell), leap not over the hedge of any commandment, so to escape any piece of foul way; but as those kine of the Philistines held straight on their way to Bethshemesh, 1 Samuel 6:12, though they had calves at home; so let us to heaven, though we have various things to divert us. "Let thine eyes look right on; and let thine eyelids look straight before thee," Proverbs 4:25.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/hebrews-12.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

13.] and make straight tracks for your feet (Carpzov appears first to have noticed that these words, καὶ τροχιὰς ὀρθὰς ποιήσατε τοῖς ποσὶν ὑμῶν, constituted an hexameter line. They are quoted in substance from Proverbs 4:26, ὀρθὰς τροχιὰς ποίει σοῖς ποσίν.

τροχιά is properly the mark left by the τροχός, the rut or wheel-mark, indicating a track or road. See reff. τοῖς ποσίν is best taken dative, ‘for your feet,’ not ablative (Schulz, Thol., Bleek, De Wette, Lünem., al.) “with your feet” as instrumental: see on the following clause. And the meaning seems to be, Let your walk be so firm and so unanimous in the right direction, that a plain track and highway may be thereby established for those who accompany and follow you to perceive and walk in. Cf. Isaiah 35:8), that that which is lame be not turned out of the way, but rather be healed ( τὸ χωλόν indicates that part of the church which was wavering between Christianity and Judaism: answering to the ἀσθενεῖς of the Epistle to the Romans. If the whole congregation, by their united and consistent walk, trod a plain and beaten path for men’s feet, these lame ones, though halting, would be easily able to keep in it, and by keeping in the τροχιὰ ὀρθή, would even acquire the habit of walking straight onward, and so be healed: but if the tracks were errant and confused, their erratic steps would deviate more and more, till at length they fell away out of the right way altogether. This connexion between the clauses only subsists entire when τοῖς ποσίν is taken as dative: if as ablative, with your feet, it is not easy to say what sequence there would be between the making of such tracks and the healing of the lame without a very harsh ellipsis between the two clauses, ‘in which others may walk,’ or the like. ἐκτραπῇ is rendered by many of the ancient and some modern expositors, “be dislocated.” So Œc. ( ἵνα μὴ τὸ ἐναρχθὲν κακόν, τοῦτο γὰρ τὸ χωλόν, εἰς ἀνήκεστον ἔλθῃ, μᾶλλον δὲ διορθωθῇ), Thl. ( ἔτι προσπλάγητε καὶ ἐκτραπῶσιν οἱ πόδες ὑμῶν, τουτέστι παντελῶς στρεβλοὶ γένωνται), Schlichting, Grot., Wolf, Carpzov, Cramer, Michaelis, Ernesti, Schleusner, Heinrichs, Bretschn., Klee, De Wette, Stuart, al. But against this there are two objections: 1. the common usage of the word; which (see Wetst. on 1 Timothy 1:6, and reff.) is, to be turned aside: and even in the place quoted from Galen by Carpzov to justify the other meaning, it far more likely has this one: τῆς ὑγιεινῆς ἔργον, τὸ κατὰ μικρὰ τὴν εἰς τὸ παρὰ φύσιν ἐκτροπὴν (deviation) ἐπανορθοῦσθαι: 2. the μᾶλλον δέ, introducing the second clause, which seems to shew, that more is contained in the contrast than was in the member with which it was contrasted, and thus fully justifies the falling short in the meaning of ἐκτραπῇ from that of ἰαθῇ: q. d. ‘should not be turned out of the way; nay rather than suffer any the least increase of its infirmity, should be healed of it.’ It should be noticed that the Writer has still the image of a race before him. The making a beaten track for all is, that they may not miss the way and lose the prize).


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/hebrews-12.html. 1863-1878.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Hebrews 12:13. And make straight paths, &c.— Dr. Heylin paraphrases the verse thus: Make even paths for your feet, that the lame ancle may not be sprained, but on the contrary recover strength; that is, says he, "Order your course of life so, as to avoid the occasions of sin; those especially, wherein you are more liable to relapse, either by constitutional infirmity, or evil habits before indulged." Such dangerous occasions are spoken of as offendicula, stumbling-blocks in our way;—the metaphor is continued in the sequel, which instructs the sincere believer or genuine penitent in a matter of great moment, and very pertinent to what was said just before, of making fresh resolutions, &c. It also coincides with the important admonition in the beginning of this chapter, that we should cast aside every weight, &c.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/hebrews-12.html. 1801-1803.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Hebrews 12:13. καὶ τροχιὰς ὀρθὰς ποιήσατε τοῖς ποσὶν ὑμῶν] and make straight tracks with your feet, i.e. advance with straight course upon the Christian path of life you have once entered upon, without bending aside to the right or to the left; that is to say, without mingling up that which is Jewish with that which is Christian, or suffering yourselves to be enticed to a relapse into Judaism. Incorrectly do Ebrard, Delitzsch, Riehm (Lehrbegr. des Hebräerbr. p. 789), Alford, Kluge, Moll, Kurtz, Ewald, M‘Caul, Hofmann, and others explain τοῖς ποσὶν ὑμῶν: for your feet. For, apart from the fact that this interpretation destroys the harmony with the figure employed at Hebrews 12:12, that of the παρειμέναι χεῖρες and παραλελυμένα γόνατα, the author cannot possibly intend to say that the readers themselves have first to prepare the way for themselves. The way has already been prepared for them by Christ (Hebrews 10:20), and it is now only a question of their making advance upon the same in the right way.

For the expression, which accidentally forms a hexameter(118) (see Winer, Gramm., 7 Aufl. p. 595), comp. LXX. Proverbs 4:26 : ὀρθὰς τροχιὰς ποίει σοῖς ποσί.

ἵνα μὴ τὸ χωλὸν ἐκτρπῇ, ἰαθῇ δὲ μᾶλλον] that not (even) that which is lame may turn aside from the way, but rather he healed. τὸ χωλόν denotes not the suffering member in an individual, but within the larger community, thus the member of the Christian communion who is lame or halting, i.e. who makes only a tottering progress in Christianity, and falls away from the same if he does not gain a support in the rest of the community advancing in a straight course [Galatians 2:14]. On τὸ χωλόν, as figurative designation of the wavering between two different bents of belief, comp. LXX. 1 Kings 18:21 : ἕως πότε ὑμεῖς χωλανεῖτε ἐπʼ ἀμφωτέραις ταῖς ἰγνύαις; how long do ye halt upon both knee-joints (sides), i.e. do ye hesitate between the service of Jehovah and that of Baal?

To the verb ἐκτρέπεσθαι, Fr. Junius, Grotius, Wolf, Carpzov, Heinrichs, and many others, finally Bleek, de Wette, Ebrard, Kurtz, Ewald, on account of the opposition ἰαθῇ δὲ μᾶλλον, assign the passive signification: to be dislocated. But justified by the usage of the language (see Wetstein at 1 Timothy 1:6) is the middle signification alone: bend aside (from the way), turn aside. This signification is therefore to be maintained here also, and ἰαθῇ δὲ μᾶλλον continues in an abbreviated form the figure employed, in that its meaning is: but rather through the animating example given by the whole body, may he cured of his wavering, and briskly advance with the rest.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/hebrews-12.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Hebrews 12:13. In short, the precious blood of Christ is applied to us in sprinkling, in washing, in drinking, on account of the personal union, in a manner real, yet supernatural, and therefore quite incomprehensible. “That (saying respecting the blood of Jesus Christ, 1 John 1:7) is to be understood, not only of the MERIT of the blood of Christ perfected once for all upon the cross, but John there treats of that subject, because in the business of justification, not merely the divine nature in Christ, but also His blood, in the way of EFFICACY, is to cleanse us from all sin. Thus the flesh of Christ is life-giving food.”—Form. Conc., Art. 8, de Persona Christi, p. 776.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/hebrews-12.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Make straight, smooth ways, such as have all stones of stumbling and rocks of offence removed, so as themselves may be set right in comfort, and duty, and walking; lest being lame or halting in their minds between Judaism and Christianity, because of the violent persecution of them by their infidel brethren, they should be turned aside out of God’s way, erring, and deviating from the truth of the gospel; but that they be restored to it, so as no sufferings upon that account, under God’s hand, might make them suppress the truth, or expose them to apostacy, or to walk as stumbling-blocks to others, and wounding their own souls, Acts 15:1 Galatians 2:11-15 6:12.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/hebrews-12.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Make straight paths for your feet; walk in the plain way of duty, and that not merely for your own sake, but for the sake of feeble and halting among your brethren; that they, by your good example, may be kept in the right way, and healed of their spiritual infirmities.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/hebrews-12.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

13. ἐκτραπῇ. Lit., “that the lame (i.e. lameness) may not be quite out of joint, but may rather be cured.” The verb ἐκτραπῆ may mean “be turned out of the way,” as in 1 Timothy 1:6; 1 Timothy 5:15; 2 Timothy 4:4; but as it is a technical term for “spraining” or “dislocation” it may have that meaning here, especially as he has used two medical terms in the previous verse, and has the metaphor of “healing” in his thoughts. The writer may have met with these terms in ordinary life, or in his intercourse with St Luke, with whose language he shews himself familiar throughout the Epistle. Intercourse with the beloved physician is perhaps traceable in some of the medical terms of St Paul’s later Epistles (see Dean Plumptre’s papers on this subject in the Expositor, IV. 134 (first series). But τὸ χωλὸν is a natural metaphor for weakness, and may be derived from the curious translation of the LXX. in 1 Kings 18:21, ἕως πότε ὑμεῖς χωλανεῖτε ἐπὶ ἀμφοτέραις ταῖς ἰγνύαις;

ἰαθῇ δὲ μᾶλλον. Isaiah 57:17-19.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/hebrews-12.html. 1896.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

straight. Greek. orthos. Only here and Acts 14:10.

paths. Greek. trochia. Only here.

be turned out of the way. Greek. ektrepomai. See 1 Timothy 1:6.

healed. Greek. iaomai. See Luke 6:17.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/hebrews-12.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And make straight paths for your feet, lest that which is lame be turned out of the way; but let it rather be healed.

From Proverbs 4:26, Septuagint, 'Mike straight paths for thy feet;' i:e., a straight road to joy and grace (Hebrews 12:1-2; Hebrews 12:15). Cease to "halt" (as the "lame") between Judaism and Christianity (Bengel). "Paths" [ trochias (Greek #5163)] - 'wheel tracks.' Let your walk be so firm and unanimous in the right direction, that a plain "highway" may be established for those who follow you (Isaiah 35:8) (Alford).

That which is lame - those "weak in the faith" (Romans 14:1), having Judaizing prejudices.

Be turned out of the way (Proverbs 4:27) - and so missing the way, lose the prize (Hebrews 12:1).

Rather be healed. Proper exercise contributes to health; walking straight onward in the right way tends to healing.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/hebrews-12.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) And make straight paths.—Quoted with some slight changes from the Greek translation of Proverbs 4:26, “ponder” (or, more probably, make even) “the path of thy feet.”

Be turned out of the way.—The difficulty in these words is concealed to some extent when they are separated from the following clause, as in the Authorised version; this separation, however, the Greek will not allow. If the words be rendered, “that what is lame may not be turned out of the way, but may rather be healed,” we cannot but feel that the two members are somewhat incongruous. It is probable, therefore, that the first verb here bears the meaning which it not unfrequently has in medical writers, be put out of joint. Let the paths (or tracks) which you follow be straight, for crooked and uneven paths will make the limbs which are lame more helpless still; should nothing aggravate the hurt that has been received, it may soon be healed. In the application, the words are a warning against the shifting courses of men who are ready to turn aside from strict duty when persecution threatens, and seek to avert the danger by compliance with what they do not in heart approve. Whatever may be the result in the case of “the strong” (Romans 14:1; 1 Corinthians 8), the example brings destruction on “the weak.”


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/hebrews-12.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And make straight paths for your feet, lest that which is lame be turned out of the way; but let it rather be healed.
make
Proverbs 4:26,27; Isaiah 35:3,8-10; 40:3,4; 42:16; 58:12; Jeremiah 18:15; Luke 3:5
straight
or, even. lame.
Isaiah 35:6; Jeremiah 31:8,9
but let
Galatians 6:1; Jude 1:22,23

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/hebrews-12.html.

E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament

Make straight paths. Christians are not permitted to devise their own plan of religious life; that has been done by the Lord. Thelmeaning is that they should be careful to walk in the path that has been prepared for them. They should do this not only for their own sake, but for others who may be influenced by their example. therwise if they do that which is not right, those who have less knowledge or ability might be confused and caused to lose the way. Instead of such a result, their lives should be such that

the lame or weaker ones may be healed or led aright.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Zerr, E.M. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/znt/hebrews-12.html. 1952.

Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans

And make straight paths for your feet, lest that which is lame be turned out of the way; but let it rather be healed.

And to beware of casting a stumbling block in the way of others, as far as lies in our power, to facilitate each other's progress by our influence and example, lest the weak be turned out of the way; but we should rather aim at their being strengthened and restored to soundness.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haldane, Robert. "Commentary on Hebrews 12:13". "Haldane's Exposition on the Epistle to the Romans and Hebrews". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hal/hebrews-12.html. 1835.

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