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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 54:16

 

 

"Behold, I Myself have created the smith who blows the fire of coals And brings out a weapon for its work; And I have created the destroyer to ruin.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Behold, I have created the smith - The sense of this verse is, ‹Everything that can effect your welfare is under my control. The smith who manufactures the instruments of war or of torture is under me. His life, his strength, his skill, are all in my hands, and he can do nothing which I shall not deem it best to permit him to do. So with the enemy of the church himself - the waster who destroys. I bare made him, and he is wholly under my control and at my disposal.‘ The smith who bloweth the coals, denotes the man who is engaged in forging instruments for war, or for any other purpose. Here it refers to him who should be engaged in forging instruments of battle to attack the church; and why should it not refer also to him who should be engaged in making instruments of torture - such as are used in times of persecution?

That bringeth forth an instrument for his work - Lowth, ‹According to his work.‘ Noyes, ‹By his labor.‘ The idea is, that he produces an instrument as the result of his work.

I have created the waster to destroy - I have formed every man who is engaged in spreading desolation by wars, and I have every such man under my control (see the notes at Isaiah 10:5-7; Isaiah 37:26-27; Isaiah 46:1-6). The sense here is, that as God had all such conquerors under his control, they could accomplish no more than he permitted them to do.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-54.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Behold, I have created the smith that bloweth the coals in the fire,.... Into which he puts his iron to soften it, that he may beat it, and form it into what shape he pleases; which descriptive clause is added to show that it is a blacksmith that is intended, and to distinguish him from the carpenter and mason, of whom this word is also used, who deal, the one in wood, and the other in stone, and neither of which requires fire: now the Lord observes, to the comfort of his people, surrounded by enemies with instruments of war in their hands, that he made the smith that made these, not only as a man, but as an artificer gave him all the skill he has in making military weapons; and therefore could take away his skill, or hinder him from making any, or destroy and defeat, and render useless those that are made; and therefore they had nothing to fear from warlike preparations. Some understand this of the devil, that great incendiary of mankind; and others of a council of war, that forms the design, blows up the coals of contention, and brings forth the plan of operation in war, it follows, as a further description of the smith,

and that bringeth forth an instrument for his work: who takes the iron out of the fire which he blows, as an instrument to work upon, and which he forms into a military weapon, as an arrow, a sword, a spear, or shield; or, "for their work"F5למעשהו "ad opus ipsorum", Gataker. ; for the use of the enemies of Christ and his church:

and I have created the waster to destroy; military men, soldiers that use the above weapons of destruction for that purpose; these are God's creatures, and he can destroy or disappoint them, so that their hands cannot perform their enterprise. Some understand this also of the devil, who is by way of eminence the waster of mankind; others of tyrannical princes; I should choose to interpret it of the Romish antichrist, that waster and destroyer of the souls of men, and of the antichristian states that destroy the earth, and shall be destroyed themselves; or of the Turk, the locust, whose king is called Apollyon and Abaddon, which signifies a waster and a destroyer, Revelation 11:18. These are said to be "created" by the Lord, not only because they are his creatures, the work of his hands, but because they are raised up by his providence, according to his secret purpose, as Pharaoh was, to show his power in them; and are permitted by him to continue for awhile to fulfil his will, being entirely dependent upon him, and subject to his influence, direction, and overruling providence; and therefore his people had no reason to be afraid of them.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-54.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Behold, I have created the p smith that bloweth the coals in the fire, and that bringeth forth an instrument for his work; and I have created the waster to destroy.

(p) Signifying by this that man can do nothing, but so far as God gives power: for seeing that all are his creatures, he must govern and guide them.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/isaiah-54.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The workman that forms “weapons against thee” (Isaiah 54:17) is wholly in My power, therefore thou needest not fear, having Me on thy side.

for his work — rather, “by his labor [Horsley]. “According to the exigencies of his work” [Maurer].

waster to destroy — (Isaiah 10:5-7; Isaiah 37:26, Isaiah 37:27; Isaiah 45:1-6). Desolating conquerors who use the “instruments” framed by “the smith.” The repetition of the “I” implies, however, something in the latter half of the verse contrasted with the former understand it, therefore, thus: “I have in My power both him who frames arms and him who destroys them (arms)” [Rosenmuller].


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-54.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

The smith - Both the smith that makes warlike instruments, and the soldier that uses them, are my creatures, and totally at my command, and therefore they cannot hurt you without my leave. The waster - To destroy only whom and when I please.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

on the Whole Bible". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-54.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

16.Behold, I have created the workmen. The Lord shows how easily and readily he delivers his Church from the base attacks of wicked men; for they can do nothing but so far as the Lord permits them, though he makes use of them as instruments for chastising his people. Moreover, this may be appropriately viewed as referring both to the Babylonians and to other foes who afterwards distressed the elect people. If the former sense be preferred, God undertakes to prove that he can easily drive away those whom he led against them, and east down those whom he raised up. If it be supposed to refer to Antiochus and others of the same description, the meaning will not be very different; namely, that they too shall not be permitted to hurt them, because they cannot even move a finger but by God’s direction.

But it may be thought that the Prophet contradicts himself; for in the former verse he said, that wicked men attack the Church “without the Lord,” and now he says that they fight under God as their leader, that under his guidance and direction they may waste and destroy. I reply, we must keep in view the contrast; namely, that the Lord had raised up the Babylonians to destroy the Church. We must observe the metaphor of the deluge, by which he denoted utter extermination; for at that time the Church might be said to have been drowned, and he made use of the Babylonians as his agents for that purpose. But he solemnly declares that henceforth he is resolved to restrain his anger, so as never to permit the Church to be destroyed by her enemies, though he chastise her by his own hand. The object at which the enemies of the Church aim, and which they labor with all their might to accomplish, is to ruin and destroy the Church; but the Lord restrains their attacks; for “without him,” that is, without his command, they do nothing. Some explain the meaning to be, that. “the workman has been created for his work,” that is, that he may effect his own destruction, and the waster, to destroy himself. But the former sense appears to me more simple.

I have created the waster to destroy. When the Lord says that he “createth the waster,” this does not refer merely to the nature with which men are born, but to the very act of “wasting.” And yet we must not, on that account, lay blame on God, as if he were the author of the unjust cruelty which dwells in men alone; for God does not give assent to their wicked inclinations, but regulates their efforts by his secret providence, and employs them as the instruments of his anger. But on this subject we have treated in the exposition of other passages.


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-54.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 54:16 Behold, I have created the smith that bloweth the coals in the fire, and that bringeth forth an instrument for his work; and I have created the waster to destroy.

Ver. 16. Behold, I have created the smith that bloweth the coals,] i.e., The devil, say some; rather his imps and instruments, those kindle coals and tools of his.

And I have created the waster to destroy.] Those brats of Abaddon. I have determined their evil doings, overruling the same, and directing them to a good end.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-54.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Both the smith that maketh all warlike instruments, and the soldier that useth them, are my creatures, and totally at my command, and therefore they cannot hurt you without my leave. To destroy; to destroy only whom and when I please.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-54.html. 1685.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Whatever happens to the redeemed in that era would be by the will of God, who not only raises up destroyers to destroy, and provides the weapons that they use, but creates the blacksmiths who make the weapons. All that the people of God would experience would be part of God"s good intention and design for them.

"This verse is very instructive for the study of divine providence. It teaches that nothing occurs, not even the destroying acts of the enemies of God"s people, apart from God Himself. At the same time we are not to blame Him for the evil that men do (cf. the express statement of the previous verse), but in His secret providence God governs the efforts and actions of men and employs them as the instruments of His anger." [Note: Young, 3:372.]


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/isaiah-54.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Destroy. I can give peace or war. (Calmet) --- Septuagint, "but I have created thee not for utter destruction." (Haydock)

 


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/isaiah-54.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

I have created. Compare Isaiah 45:7, Isaiah 45:8.

instrument = weapon.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-54.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Behold, I have created the smith that bloweth the coals in the fire, and that bringeth forth an instrument for his work; and I have created the waster to destroy.

Behold, I have created the smith. The workmen that forms 'weapons against thee' (Isaiah 54:17) is wholly in my power, therefore thou needest not fear, having me on thy side.

That bringeth forth an instrument for his work - rather, 'by his labour' (Horsley). 'According to l


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-54.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(16) Behold, I have created the smith . . .—The words assert the same thought. The “axe,” the “hammer,” the “sword,” of the great ravagers of the earth are formed by the great Work-Master, and He would fashion no such weapon against the new Jerusalem.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-54.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Behold, I have created the smith that bloweth the coals in the fire, and that bringeth forth an instrument for his work; and I have created the waster to destroy.
I have
10:5,6,15; 37:26; 46:11; Exodus 9:16; Proverbs 16:4; Daniel 4:34,35; John 19:11

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 54:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-54.html.


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Friday, July 21st, 2017
the Week of Proper 10 / Ordinary 15
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