Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 17:19

For their sakes I sanctify Myself, that they themselves also may be sanctified in truth.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Prayer;   Sanctification;   Truth;   Word of God;   Thompson Chain Reference - Ask;   Christ;   Christ's;   Church;   Family;   Importunity;   Prayer;   Sanctified Ones;   Secret Prayer;   United Prayer;   Unwise Prayers;   Wicked, the;   The Topic Concordance - Belief;   Declaration;   Giving and Gifts;   Glory;   Jesus Christ;   Knowledge;   Love;   Manifestation;   Sanctification;   Sending and Those Sent;   Unity;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Prayer, Intercessory;   Sanctification;   Truth;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Consecration;   Priest;   Sanctification;   Truth;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Mediator, Mediation;   Obedience;   Sanctification;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Commentary;   Covenant;   Intercession of Christ;   Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ;   Predestination;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Hypostatic union;   Holman Bible Dictionary - John, the Gospel of;   Truth;   Unity;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   Ephesians, Epistle to;   Prayer;   Priest;   Sanctification, Sanctify;   Truth;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Aaron;   Announcements of Death;   Church (2);   Communion (2);   Consecrate, Consecration (2);   Faith ;   Force;   Fruit (2);   Hallowed;   Holiness;   Holiness Purity;   John, Gospel of (Ii. Contents);   Judas Iscariot;   Letters;   Mental Characteristics;   Merit;   Prayer (2);   Sacrifice;   Sanctification;   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Truth (2);   Vicarious Sacrifice;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - John, the Gospel by;   Nazarite ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Body;   Nazarites;   Sanctification;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Sanctify;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Johannine Theology, the;   Lord's Supper (Eucharist);   Prayer;   Prayers of Jesus;   Sanctification;   Truth;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for August 26;   Every Day Light - Devotion for October 10;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I sanctify myself - I consecrate and devote myself to death - that I may thereby purchase eternal salvation for them. There seems to be here an allusion to the entering of the high priest into the holy of holies, when, having offered the sacrifice, he sprinkled the blood before the ark of the covenant. So Jesus entered into the holiest of all by his own blood, in order to obtain everlasting redemption for men: see Hebrews 9:11-13. The word, ἁγιαζω, to consecrate or sanctify, is used in the sense of devoting to death, in Jeremiah 12:3, both in the Hebrew and in the Septuagint: the Hebrew קדש signifies also to sacrifice.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 17:19". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-17.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I sanctify myself - I consecrate myself exclusively to the service of God. The word “sanctify” does not refer here to personal sanctification, for he had no sin, but to setting himself apart entirely to the work of redemption.

That they also … -

1. That they might have an example of the proper manner of laboring in the ministry, and might learn of me how to discharge its duties. Ministers will understand their work best when they most faithfully study the example of their great model, the Son of God.

2. That they might be made pure by the effect of my sanctifying myself - that is, that they might be made pure by the shedding of that blood which cleanses from all sin. By this only can men be made holy; and it was because the Saviour so sanctified himself, or set himself to this work so unreservedly as to shed his own blood, that any soul can be made pure and fit for the kingdom of God.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-17.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they themselves also may be sanctified in truth.

Sanctify ... here does not refer to being made more holy, because such a meaning could not have pertained to Jesus. Thus, another meaning of "sanctify," which is "to consecrate," is intended (English Revised Version margin). Jesus was in the act of consecrating himself as the one great sacrifice for sin. "The truth," the evident means of Jesus' consecration, was the word of God, which was the source of motivation and power for Jesus as he moved toward the cross. By opening up, through his death, the way of salvation for all, Jesus made it possible for the apostles also to be sanctified in truth, that is, by the same word of God.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And for their sakes I sanctify myself,.... Which is to be understood, not of his making himself holy; for he never was a sinner, and so stood in no need of sanctification: he was made like unto us, yet without sin; he looked like a sinner, but was not one; he was traduced, charged, and treated as such, but was perfectly holy, and free from all sin; he was essentially and infinitely holy as God; and as man, he was holy in his conception and birth; he was filled with the Holy Ghost, and was holy in his life and in his death: rather this may be meant of his being separated, and set apart for his office as Mediator, which, though done by the Father, and is ascribed unto him, John 10:36; yet may also be attributed to himself; since he voluntarily devoted himself to this work, and cheerfully accepted of it: though it seems best to understand it of his offering himself a sacrifice for, and in the room and stead of his people, in allusion to the offerings under the law, the sacrificing of which is expressed by sanctifying, Exodus 13:2; and because his sacrifice was an Holy One: what he sanctified or offered was "himself": not his divine, but human nature, his body and his soul; and these as in union with his divine person; which gives his sacrifice the preference to all others, and is the true reason of its virtue and efficacy; and this is expressive of his great love. He himself is also the sanctifier or offerer, which shows him to be a priest, and that he had a power over his own life, and that he sacrificed it voluntarily; and this he is said to do at that present time, because the time was very near that he was to be offered up, and his present prayer and intercession were a part of his priestly office. This he did not for his own sake, nor for the sake of angels, nor for all men, but for his disciples, as distinct from the world; and not for the apostles only, but for all that the Father had given to him; and that as their substitute and surety, in their room and stead:

that they also might be sanctified through the truth; that is, have all their sins expiated, and they be cleansed from all the guilt and filth of them, through Christ himself and his sacrifice, who is the truth; or "in truth"; as it may be rendered, really and truly, in opposition to the legal sacrifices which atoned for sin, not really, only typically; or through the. Gospel of truth, bringing the good news of atonement by the blood and sacrifice of Christ, and which the Spirit of God seals to the conscience with comfort and joy.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 17:19". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-17.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the g truth.

(g) The true and substantial sanctification of Christ is contrasted with the outward purifyings of the law.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on John 17:19". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/john-17.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

And for their sakes I sanctify — consecrate.

myself that they also might — may.

be sanctified — consecrated. The only difference between the application of the same term to Christ and the disciples is, as applied to Christ, that it means only to “consecrate”; whereas, in application to the disciples, it means to consecrate with the additional idea of previous sanctification, since nothing but what is holy can be presented as an offering. The whole self-sacrificing work of the disciples appears here as a mere result of the offering of Christ [Olshausen].

through — in.

the truth — Though the article is wanting in the original here, we are not to translate, as in the Margin,truly sanctified”; for the reference seems plainly to be “the truth” mentioned in John 17:17. (See on John 17:17).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-17.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

For their sakes I sanctify myself. He did this when he came into the world, when he made it his meat to do the Father's will, and when he gave himself to death. We sanctify ourselves when we "present our bodies as living sacrifices."

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 17:19". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-17.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

I sanctify myself (εγω αγιαζω εμαυτονegō hagiazō emauton). To his holy ministry to which the Father “sanctified” (ηγιασενhēgiasen) him (John 10:36).

That they themselves also may be sanctified in truth (ινα ωσιν και αυτοι ηγιασμενοι εν αλητειαιhina ōsin kai autoi hēgiasmenoi en alētheiāi). Purpose clause with ιναhina and the periphrastic perfect passive subjunctive of αγιαζωhagiazō (that they may remain sanctified). The act of Christ helps us, but by no means takes the place of personal consecration on the part of the believer. This high and holy prayer and act of Christ should shame any one who uses the livery of heaven to serve the devil in as does, alas, sometimes happen (2 Corinthians 11:13-15).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-17.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth.

I sanctify myself — I devote myself as a victim, to be sacrificed.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 17:19". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-17.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they themselves also may be sanctified in truth1.

  1. And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they themselves also may be sanctified in truth. Jesus had set himself apart (Hebrews 9:14), that the apostles might follow his example (2 Corinthians 5:14-17), and also the church, (Romans 12:1,2; Philippians 2:5) that thereby the world might be saved.

    Our Lord's prayer as to the apostles (John 17:1-19) is, therefore, a threefold petition, viz.: that they may be kept in unity, kept from the world and the devil, and that they may be set apart and equipped for the gospel service.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 17:19". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-17.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Sanctify myself; consecrate myself, that is, to the work of redemption.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/john-17.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

И за них Я посвящаю Себя. Этими словами Христос ясно дает понять, из какого источника проистекает освящение, совершаемое в нас евангельским учением. Ведь Он посвящает Себя Отцу, дабы Его освящение перешло к нам. Подобно тому, как благословение, начав с немногого, достигает затем полного эффекта, так и Дух Божий, окропляя нас святостью Христовой, делает нас Его причастниками. И не только путем одного лишь вменения, по каковой причине говорится, что Христос сделался для нас праведностью (1Кор.1:30). Ведь также сказано, что Он сделался для нас освящением, поскольку в Своем лице неким образом принес нас в жертву Отцу, дабы Дух Его обновил нас к подлинной святости. Далее, освящение это хотя и относится ко всей жизни Христа, в наибольшей степени воссияло в Его жертве. Ведь тогда Он и явился истинным священником, освящающим храм, алтарь, сосуды и народ силою Святого Духа.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE CONSECRATION OF PERSONALITY

‘And for their sakes I sanctify Myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth.’

John 17:19

The translation is perhaps a little old-fashioned at this point and remote from our ordinary use, too much so to give us at once the full force of the statement. We may render it in more modern phrase—‘For their sakes I consecrate Myself, that they also may be consecrated in truth.’

I. ‘I consecrate Myself.’—Who is it that thus unfolds the secret and motive of His life? ‘I’ and ‘myself’ are terms in which each one of us speaks of that mysterious force which he calls his personality. I am I, I am conscious of myself, I have a certain control over myself, with care I can improve myself, by neglect I can spoil myself. Moreover, I can awaken a response to myself in the world outside myself. I can put myself into outside things and shape them, as the artist puts himself into his handiwork and the musician puts himself into his music. More than this, most wonderful of all, I can put myself, to some extent, into other persons, as the master puts himself into his scholars, as the officer puts himself into his men, as the statesman puts himself into his party. My personality can modify the personality of another.

II. It is, then, a Personality that speaks to us here and says ‘I’ and ‘Myself’; a conscious centre of vital force revealing to us His most sacred secret, telling us of His own discipline of Himself and of the effect which He looks to produce on the happiness of other men. ‘I consecrate Myself, that they also may be consecrated.’ Personality is the inalienable possession of every human being as such; it is a gift which each one of us has received from God, Who is the Supreme Personality, in Whose image we have been made. But there is a vast difference between the force of one personality and the force of another. Personalities vary in respect of physical and mental capacity, in respect of opportunity of development, and, above all, in the use which they make of their opportunity, whatever it may be. Those persons who are favoured by natural conditions and by external circumstances, and who use their opportunity of self-development in a high degree, we are accustomed to speak of as personalities par excellence. We make a clear distinction between a personage and a personality. Outward circumstances make a personage; inward force, disciplined and developed, alone can make what we honour by the name of a personality.

III. It is not only a Personality, but the most personal of all personalities, Who speaks in the text and tells us the secret of His effective personality. ‘I consecrate Myself.’ The words imply at least this—‘I am conscious of Myself, I can dispose of Myself; what I do with Myself will influence the selves of others, and therefore when I do the one thing with Myself which leads to the highest self-realisation and self-development, and which leads at the same time to the widest and deepest and most permanent influence on the selves of others, I take Myself, and by an act of self-determination I give Myself, I consecrate Myself, to the Supreme Personality of the universe—the Personal God. I say to Him in every conscious moment of My existence, “Father, not My will but Thine be done; and since Thy Will is the consecration of all personalities, the union of all wills with Thine, oh, therefore, Father, for their sakes I consecrate Myself, that they also may be consecrated in truth.”’

IV. The more forcible the personality that is consecrated, and the more complete the consecration, the greater and truer the saint.—Let us take a parallel. The commanding personalities of the world, devoted to great ends and favoured by congenial circumstances, are its heroes. The commanding personalities of the Christian Church, consecrated to God, and called to great service or great suffering, are the saints. You cannot all be heroes, and yet you have a certain capacity for heroic resolve and even heroic action, and so the heroes help you. The study of great men’s lives is one of your best aids to the development of your personality. The sight of their memorials has stimulated many a young man to the effort to realise his own personality and to leave his permanent record in the world, and just in like manner you cannot all be saints, heroes of the spiritual life; and yet you have your personality, which is wholly your own, and the power of consecrating it according to your opportunity. Therefore the study of the saints may help you, and the commemoration of saintliness need not depress you. You, in your place, in your measure, you can consecrate what you are to God; you can yield your lesser personalities, as they yielded their greater personalities, to the Supreme Personality. So by the mercy of God, Who judges not according to what a man hath not, but according to what he hath, even you may come at last to be numbered and rewarded with His saints.

Dean J. Armitage Robinson.

Illustration

‘Parents, for your children; masters, for your pupils; friends, for your friends, consecrate yourselves that they may be consecrated also. This is how Christianity is spread from the very beginning, for it follows the general law which governs the spread of ideas and the deepening of convictions. It is propagated by personality far more than by argument. Convictions produce convictions, consecration leads to consecration, personality reaches personality. You are passing, or you have passed, into years when habits are fixed and character is already almost unchangeable. For yourselves you have little hope that life can be much modified now, or that it can be rescued from its failure or comparative failure, but you do want those whom you love more than yourself to be better men and women than you have been. You want the “might have been” of your life to find a sure realisation in theirs. Then you must go down on your knees and bring what is left of your neglected and impaired and dwindling personality into the Presence of God. But young and eager soul, you are not to be depressed by the thought of the peculiar greatness of the hero or of the saint, for your lives are before you to do with them as you will. Each one of you has this most mysterious gift of personality—of saying “I am I,” of being a conscious centre of living force, a person capable of a purpose, able to act upon outside things, able to act upon other persons, capable of developing your own personality, of acquiring mental strength and moral character. To you God comes to-day, and this is what He says: “Recognise this capacity, take pains, be all that you can be, not selfishly, but for the noblest ends.” Consecrate your personality to Him, watch over it, and develop it for Him.’

(SECOND OUTLINE)

SECRETS OF SANCTITY

Holiness is spiritual wholeness—Godliness is Godlikeness.

The root idea of Christian holiness is possibly best seen on its human side by studying the word, Sanctification. In both Testaments the words, Holy, Hallow, Holiness, exactly correspond with Saint, Sanctify, Sanctification. The ruling thought of each is separation. Sanctification involves separation always and under all circumstances, whether in the Old Testament or the New.

I. Sanctification is separation from sin.—Here is one of those fundamental truths writ large for us in Scripture. The man who is truly separated may expect the Holy Spirit to reveal from time to time whatever may be sinful or inconsistent; and until that thing is renounced or forsaken no further advance is possible. Israel, separated from Egypt, was thirty-eight years in the wilderness before it learned this lesson. May God write it speedily in our hearts! We may talk and pray and go softly all our days, but until we obey the intimations of the Spirit and the plain teaching of Scripture, we come to a standstill.

II. Sanctification is separation unto God.—It was so in Israel’s days; it is so still. The minute observances of the Mosaic law appear at first sight arbitrary, formal, and unspiritual. Wherein lay the power of the Old Testament ritual to sanctify the heart, to produce, in other words, holiness of life? The answer is clear. It was not these ceremonials which in themselves separated Israel from the nations, for ritual observances are the natural effort of the heart to please God.

III. Sanctification to-day is separation in Jesus Christ.—It has been strikingly observed that from the moment our Saviour uttered the high-priestly words, ‘Sanctify them in Thy truth: Thy word is truth,’ ‘For their sakes I sanctify Myself,’ the meaning of the word sanctification in the Bible deepens and widens. It no longer merely means separation from evil, but likeness to ‘the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.’ The Old Testament provides for the one, the New Testament provides for the other, and the transitional words are those of our great High Priest on His way to Gethsemane.

God has a definite ideal for my life: it is likeness to His own life. Let me ponder this well. It is very wonderful; but never let me forget that the first great condition of all holiness is separation. Separation from sin; separation unto God; separation in Christ Jesus; and all this through the power of God the Holy Spirit.

—Rev. Canon Barnes-Lawrence.

Illustration

‘A well-known Christian man had publicly accused another of some serious fault or sin. As events proved he was mistaken, and this was pointed out to him. His duty was clear; reparation was due, and a public retractation needed. It was not difficult, the opportunity came, but there was no apology then or afterwards. That public utterance was never taken back publicly, and from that time the speaker’s spiritual influence waned. Doubtless he “brought his gift to the altar,” and with tears; but to his brother, who had something against him, he was never reconciled, and God could not accept his gift.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 17:19". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-17.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

19 And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth.

Ver. 19. And for their sakes do I sanctify] As both priest, altar, and sacrifice; and this Christ did from the womb to the tomb; at his death especially, when this Paschal Lamb was roasted in the fire of his Father’s wrath, that his people might be made partakers of his holiness, Hebrews 10:10. Here also it is worth the noting, that these petitions in our Saviour’s prayer do so sweetly depend one upon another, that if you take away one, you deface the other. Phavorinus in Gellius, comparing between the style of Lysias and Plato, observes this difference; Quod si ex Platonis oratione aliquid demas mutesque de elegantia tantum detraxeris; si ex Lysiae, de sententia.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 17:19". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-17.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 17:19

Sanctification

I. The sanctification of which our Lord speaks in this place, is the consecration of the whole creature, of the whole being, to the spiritual purpose of the service of our heavenly Father. To give up everything in order that His will may be accomplished, to do that will to the very full—this is the perfect sanctification of all things. And, of course, this sanctification, in itself, does not necessarily imply any change in the thing which is sanctified. If we think of things which stand at the lowest end, and of things which stand at the highest end of being, there is no change at all in the consecration of either to the fulfilment of the will of God. But when we think of all that stands between these, when we think of the consecration of a finite creature—or, still more, of a finite creature, intelligent and possessed of will, and yet the evil in that will—it is plain that the consecration, of necessity, must imply a real change in the thing that is consecrated. If there is evil, that evil cannot be dedicated to God; if there is anything which hinders the service of our Father, that hindrance must be taken away.

II. In all work that has to be done for the sake of God here among men, the same unchanging rule ever prevails; and the man who would undertake to do it, must himself begin in his own person that regeneration which he is desirous to produce in others, and must begin to sanctify himself. If he is to help others to sanctify themselves, if he is to be the source of any moral and spiritual growth, it must be because there is in him the same moral and spiritual growth, and he must derive it from the source of all moral and spiritual growth—the sanctification of the Lord Jesus Himself. It is only by beginning within, and by seeking to be what He was, that it is possible for us to do His holy work; and those who desire to be a blessing to their fellowmen must copy the words of the Lord, and since it is their sanctification that is really needed, they must begin by sanctifying themselves.

Bishop Temple, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxix., p. 82.


References: John 17:19.—F. W. Robertson, Sermons, 2nd series, p. 204; E. Bersier, Sermons, 1st series, p. 120; John 17:20; J. H. Thom, Laws of Life after the Mind of Christ, p. 18. John 17:20, John 17:21.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. xii., No. 668; H. W. Beecher, Christian World Pulpit, vol. ix., p. 376; R. Thomas, Ibid., vol. x., p. 112.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-17.html.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

The word sanctify here, is not to be taken for the cleansing, purifying, or making holy, that which before was unclean; but Christ's sanctifying himself imports,

1. His separation of setting himself apart to be a sacrifice for sin.

2. His consecration or dedication of himself to this holy use and service.

Hence learn, that Jesus Christ did dedicate and solemnly set himself apart to the great work and office of a Mediator.

Learn, 2. That the great end for which Christ did thus sanctify himself, was, that he might sanctify his members; therefore did he consecrate and set himself apart for us, that we should be consecrated to, and wholly set apart for, him.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 17:19". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-17.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

19.] See above on John 17:17. Notice, says Meyer, the emphatic correlation of αὐτῶν ἐγὼ ἐμαυτόν καὶ αὐτοί.

It is clear against all Socinian inferences from this verse, that all that part of ἁγιάζειν implied in ch. John 10:36 is here excluded: and only that intended which is expressed Hebrews 2:10 by διὰ παθημάτων τελειῶσαι. Of this, His death was the crowning act, and was also the one to which the ὑπὲρ αὐτῶν most directly applies; but the whole is included. The confining the meaning to His sacrifice (Chrys., Euthym(236)), and the ἵνα καὶ αὐτοὶ.… to their martyrdom, or their spiritual self-offering, Romans 12:1 (Euthym(237)), is insufficient for the depth of the words.

ἐν ἀληθ.] in truth: what truth, is evident from John 17:17, where, in the repetition, ὁ λόγ. ὁ σὸς ἀλήθειά ἐστιν, the article is also wanting: see also ch. John 1:14; John 4:24 : 3 John 1:3,—for ἀλήθ, without the article. But the distinction is perhaps somewhat obscured after a preposition.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 17:19". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-17.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1713

THE END FOR WHICH CHRIST DEDICATED HIMSELF TO GOD

John 17:19. For their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth.

THE sanctification of men is no less necessary for their usefulness in this world, than it is for their happiness in the world to come. Hence our blessed Lord, in his intercessory prayer, made this a very prominent subject of his requests in behalf of his Disciples whom he was about to leave in the midst of an ensnaring world: “sanctify them through thy truth: thy word is truth [Note: ver. 17.].” And for the encouragement of all his followers to the latest period of the world he declares, that the attainment of this object in their behalf has been a very principal end of all that he ever had done, or was at that instant doing, for them: “For their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also may be sanctified through the truth.”

In opening to you these words I will shew,

I. What is that act to which our Lord here refers—

To “sanctify” means to purify from sin, and to devote to God. In the former sense it may be properly applied to men: but it is in the latter sense only that it can have any reference to Christ.

Under the Mosaic law the priests and all the vessels of the sanctuary were sanctified to the Lord [Note: Exodus 30:26-29.]. The offerings there made, all shadowed forth the Lord Jesus Christ, who sanctified and set apart himself to the work of saving a ruined world. This he did,

1. When he first undertook our cause—

[From eternity he entered into covenant with the Father to redeem our souls by his own obedience unto death: and the utter insufficiency of all other sacrifices being acknowledged, he engaged to offer himself a sacrifice for the sins of the whole world [Note: Psalms 40:6-8.] — — —]

2. When he assumed our nature—

[St. Paul cites the foregoing passage with an express reference to “the time of Christ’s coming into the world:” and there is a remarkable variation in his language suited to that occasion. In the Psalm it is said, “Mine ear hast thou opened;” referring to the law which ordained that a servant who devoted himself for ever to the service of his Master, should “have his ear bored through with an awl [Note: Exodus 21:5-6.]:” but in the Epistle it is said, “a body hast thou prepared me [Note: Hebrews 10:5-7.].” At his incarnation therefore he sanctified himself afresh to this great work.]

3. When he submitted to the baptism of John—

[John wished to decline the office of baptizing so exalted a person. But, on entering upon the office assigned him, the Lord Jesus Christ judged it necessary to consecrate himself to it afresh by this solemn ordinance, in which he was openly and ostensibly devoted unto God: “Suffer it to be so now; for thus it becometh us to fulfil all righteousness [Note: Matthew 3:15.].”]

4. When he went up to Jerusalem in order to his crucifixion—

[The paschal lamb was to be separated and set apart four days, in order to its being fully ascertained by the most accurate examination, that it was without spot or blemish, and therefore fit to be offered in sacrifice to God [Note: Exodus 12:3; Exodus 12:6.]. And on the fourth day previous to his crucifixion did our blessed Lord go up to Jerusalem, that after the strictest examination his very judges might proclaim his innocence, and consequently his fitness for the work assigned him, of making an atonement for the sins of the whole world. And his persisting in his work in opposition to all the dictates of suffering humanity, shewed that on this occasion also he sanctified himself to the office he had undertaken [Note: John 12:12-13; John 12:27-28.].”]

5. When he surrendered up himself into the hands of his murderers—

[He beat them all to the ground, when they came to apprehend him; to shew that he could with his word have struck them all dead upon the spot [Note: John 18:4-8.]. He took care also to exempt his Disciples from a participation of his lot, because their work was scarcely yet begun. But himself he resigned into the hands of sinners, in order that all which he had undertaken to do and suffer might be accomplished in him.]

Having seen what the act was, let me shew,

II. What light his performance of it throws upon his character—

There was a most mysterious composition in his character—

[All others, even Aaron himself, were sanctified through the instrumentality of one appointed to that office: but Christ “sanctified himself.” He was at the same time the Sacrifice, and the Priest that offered it, and the Altar on which it was offered [Note: Hebrews 13:10.].]

And this it was which gave his offering its efficacy—

[Had he been a mere man, his sacrifice could never have availed for the redemption of the world. But he was God and man in one person: and his divinity, whilst it gave an infinite value to his sacrifice, both qualified and authorized him to present himself a sacrifice to God. Both his body and soul were alike offered; the one to endure all that was due to our bodies, the other, all that was due to our souls. And his was, not a typical offering, like those presented under the law, but a real and true propitiation for sin. Nor did his sacrifice avail for a typical and temporary remission of sins, but for the full and everlasting forgiveness of all sin [Note: Hebrews 9:13-14.] — — — Thus the expression in my text, whilst it seems to convey nothing very particular to the mind, gives us, in reality, an insight into the deepest mysteries of our religion, and shews, that it was God who purchased the Church with his own blood [Note: Acts 20:28.].”]

Stupendous in this view, was the act to which he referred. But let us consider,

III. What his ends were in the performance of it—

Generally, it was for the sake of his people that he did this. But particularly, it was, “that they might be sanctified through the truth.”

The sanctification of his people was a very principal end which he aimed at in all that he did and suffered for them—

[His people must be sanctified unto the Lord, even as he was. The different vessels of the sanctuary, no less than the offerings presented there, were altogether devoted to the Lord. In like manner must the disciples of Christ be sanctified. In this view they are called “a kind of first-fruits,” which could on no account, and in no degree, be alienated from the Lord [Note: James 1:18.]. Nay more, we are called to “offer up our whole selves living sacrifices unto the Lord, as a reasonable and acceptable service [Note: Romans 12:1.].” And that we might be thus sanctified was the great end of all that our blessed Lord either did or suffered for us: “he gave himself for us to redeem us from all iniquity, and to purify unto himself a peculiar people zealous of good works [Note: Titus 2:14.].” And the very same object he still keeps in view in all that he is at this moment doing for us in heaven [Note: Romans 14:9.].]

This however must be accomplished through the instrumentality of his word—

[His Holy Spirit indeed is the agent, without whom not even the word itself would produce any good effect. But he is pleased to make use of his word as the means of quickening us to a heavenly life [Note: 1 Peter 1:23.], and of carrying on his work where it is begun [Note: 1 Peter 2:2.], and of completing it even to the end [Note: 2 Timothy 3:16-17.]. His word is the mould into which we are to be cast [Note: Romans 6:17. the Greek.], and by which we shall be altogether changed into the divine image. This is the state to which he desires to bring us; and by his word ministered unto us, “he will turn us from darkness unto light, and from the power of Satan unto God [Note: Acts 26:18.].”]

Observe now from hence,

1. How great is the love of Christ to fallen man!—

[He well knew all that he must endure if he would become a substitute and surety for fallen man: yet he undertook our cause, and came down from heaven for us, and never ceased from his work till he could say, “It is finished” — — — Methinks the ox and the ass may well reproach our more than brutish ingratitude [Note: Isaiah 1:3.] — — —]

2. What obligations have we to holiness!—

[By holiness T mean, a total surrender of ourselves to God. And if we aspire not after this, what do we but pour contempt upon all that Christ has done and suffered for us, and cause him, as far as lies in our power, to have “sanctified himself” in vain. What excuse shall we offer for this when he shall call us into judgment? Verily if, being “called to be saints,” we be not found so at the last day, it would be better for us never to have heard of Christ at all — — —]

3. What guilt do they contract who turn back from the service of their God!—

[As Aaron and his sons were sanctified with the blood of the Mosaic covenant [Note: Leviticus 8:30.], so are we with the blood of the Christian covenant. And, “if we sin wilfully after that we have received the knowledge of the truth, we do, in fact, tread under foot the Son of God, and count the blood of the covenant wherewith we have been sanctified an unholy thing, and do despite unto the Spirit of grace.” What then awaits us in the eternal world? The despisers of Moses’ law died without mercy: but a much sorer punishment will come on us, even the everlasting wrath of our offended God [Note: Hebrews 10:26-29.] — — — O let not any of you turn back unto perdition; but be of those who believe unto the saving of their souls [Note: Hebrews 10:38-39.].]

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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on John 17:19". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/john-17.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 17:19. ἐγὼ ἁγιάζω ἐμαυτὸν, I sanctify Myself) I dedicate and consecrate Myself wholly to Thee. They are going out into the world for My sake; I, moreover, am going to Thee, also for their good. An Euphemism, appropriate to the love of Christ: I sanctify Myself, in enduring death, and that the death of the cross.— ἡγιασμένοι, sanctified) It is of such as these, and of them only, that the Canonisation is truly being made by the Lord Himself: 1 Peter 3:18, “Christ hath once suffered for sins, the Just for the unjust, to bring us to God;” 2 Corinthians 5:15, “He died for all, that they who live should not henceforth live unto themselves, but unto Him who died for them and rose again.”— ἐν ἀληθείᾳ, in [through] the truth) even though it may not appear externally. This is contrasted with ceremonial sanctimony.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 17:19". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-17.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

I sanctify myself, here, is no more than, I set myself apart, as a sacrifice acceptable and well pleasing in the sight of God: and indeed sanctifying, in the ancient notion of it under the law, did ordinarily signify the setting of persons and things apart to the special service of God; which was done legally by certain ritual performances and ceremonies, and is still done inwardly and spiritually by regeneration, and renewing of the hearts of men and women by the efficacious working of the Holy Ghost. Christ saith, that for his disciples sake he sanctified himself, being both the Priest and the sacrifice.

Christ set apart himself as a sacrifice for his people,

that they might be sanctified: not only our eternal life and happiness, but all the means to it, fell within the counsel of God; hence we are said to be chosen of Christ, that we should be holy and without blame before him in love, Ephesians 1:4; and within the purchase of Christ: hence the apostle saith, Ephesians 5:25,26, that he gave himself for his church, that he might sanctify and cleanse it with the washing of water: and our Saviour here saith, that he set apart himself for a sacrifice for our sins, that his people might be sanctified through the truth; that is, by receiving the truth, not in their ears only, but in their hearts, in the love of it, and bringing forth the fruits of it in all holiness of life and conversation.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 17:19". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-17.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Я посвящаю Себя Слова эти означают только то, что Иисус всецело отделил Себя для воли Отца (ср. 4:34; 5:19; 6:38; 7:16; 9:4). Он сделал это для того, чтобы принесенная Им истина могла отделить для Бога верующих.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 17:19". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-17.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

I sanctify myself; consecrate and devote myself to my work, that they may be prepared and disposed to perform theirs.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-17.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

19.Sanctify myself—The great conditional sanctification or consecration of himself, by which Christ entitled himself to redeem a glorious Church from out the world, and present it pure and perfect before the Father, was the suffering of death. Thus as a redeemer he was made perfect through suffering.

For their sakes—This consecrating agony was undergone for the sake of his apostles, constituting and representing his entire glorious Church.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-17.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jesus did not mean that He intended to make Himself more holy than He already was since that would have been impossible. He set Himself apart to do God"s will partially for the sake of His disciples. He is our example of perfect sanctification, and His sanctification makes ours possible. Without the sacrificial death of Jesus there would be no salvation and no mission for us. There would be no sanctification for us either. One of the purposes of Jesus" death was to set believers apart to God and His mission for them to function as priests in the world (cf. 1 Peter 2:9).

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-17.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 17:19. And for them I consecrate myself, that they themselves also may be consecrated in truth. It was for the very purpose of bringing them to a consecration like His own that His whole work of love and sacrifice had been freely undertaken. He might have said ‘I was consecrated,’ a thought which has its perfect parallel in chap. John 10:36. But He speaks of consecrating Himself, partly because He entered into His consecration with perfect acquiescence and freedom; partly, perhaps mainly, because He is thinking of that High-priestly work of His which was now immediately impending. (It will be observed that the proleptic form of expression is not always maintained: see John 17:13.) The following words express, with special reference to the disciples, the end which Jesus had been desirous to attain. It is that their consecration might be the exact counterpart of His (‘they also’); that they might act in it a free and independent part, devoting themselves in personal faith to the task assigned them (‘they themselves’), and that all might be done ‘in truth,’—not simply truly, but in conformity with the real, the essential, the everlasting (comp. on John 17:17). Finally, let us notice that the consecration spoken of is, alike in the case of Jesus and of His disciples, not a process but an act completed at once,—in His case, when, gathering together in one view all His labours and sufferings, He presented them a living sacrifice to His Father: in theirs, when they are in like manner enabled to present themselves as living sacrifices in His one perfect sacrifice.

Thus the second section of the prayer closes, its main burden having been that the disciples, who are about to be sent forth into the world in order to carry on the work of Jesus there, and who for this purpose have had the name of the Father manifested to them that they may know the Father, and the word of the Father given them that they may proclaim the Father, may be preserved by the Father from the world, and may be enabled to exhibit a perfect consecration to the Father’s work. Thus shall the Father be glorified in them as He had been glorified in the Son, who accomplished the work that had been given Him to do.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-17.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 17:19. The crowning plea is that it was for this end, their consecration, Jesus consecrated Himself: , “and in their behalf, that they may be consecrated in truth, do I consecrate myself”. “ in the present with can only be understood of Christ’s self-consecration to His sacrificial death.” Tholuck. , Euthymius; so Meyer, Reynolds and others. This however is needlessly to limit the reference and to introduce an idea somewhat alien to this context and to John 10:36. Calvin is right: “Porro sanctificatio haec quamvis ad totam Christi vitam pertineat, in sacrificio tamen mortis ejus maxime illustris fuit”. ’ The object of Christ’s consecration to His work was the severance of His disciples from the world and their inspiration with the same spirit of self-sacrifice and devotedness to sacred uses. , understood by the Greek commentators as “real” in contrast to what is symbolic, cf.John 4:23. Thus Euthymius, , , . “Discernit a sanctificationibus legis.” Melanchthon Similarly Godet. Meyer renders “truly” and remarks: “As contrasted with every other in human relations, that wrought through the Paraclete is the true consecration”. But is it possible to neglect the reference to , John 17:17? As Lücke points out, John (3 John 1:3-4) does not always distinguish between and . The object to Christ’s consecration was to bring the truth by and in which the disciples might be consecrated.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 17:19". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-17.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

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[BIBLIOGRAPHY]

Sanctifico meipsum. Quid est hoc, says St. Augustine, (tract. 108.) nisi eos in meipso Sanctifico, quoniam membra ejus sunt? St. John Chrysostom, (hom. Greek: pb. p. 484) Offero tibi Sacrificium, Greek: prosphero soi thusian. St. Cyril says the same, lib. xi. in Joan. p. 989.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 17:19". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-17.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

for their sakes = on behalf of (Greek. huper. App-104.) them.

I sanctify Myself = I dedicate or consecrate Myself. This shows the meaning of sanctify; not making holy as to moral character, but setting apart for God. The Lord was the antitype of all the offerings, which were holy unto Jehovah.

might be = may be.

the truth. There is no article.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 17:19". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth.

And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might (or 'may') be sanctified through the truth, [ en (Greek #1722) aleetheia (Greek #225)] - 'in the truth,' or 'in truth.' Since the article is wanting in the original, we may translate, as in the margin, 'that they also may be truly sanctified,' in contrast with those ritual sanctifications with which as Jews they were so familiar. So Chrysostom, Luther, Calvin, Beza, Bengel, Meyer. But since in 2 John 1:3, and 3 John 1:3-4, the beloved disciple speaks of "walking in [the] truth," without the article-meaning certainly not 'walking truly,' but 'walking in the truth of the Gospel'-it is much better to understand our Lord to refer here to that same truth of which he had spoken in John 17:17 as the element or medium of all sanctification. So Erasmus, Lucke, Tholuck, Alford, Lange. 'The only difference,' says Olshausen excellently, 'between the application of the same term (sanctify) to Christ and the disciples is that, as applied to Christ, it means only to consecrate; whereas in application to the disciples, it means to consecrate with the additional idea of previous sanctification, since nothing but what is holy can be presented as an offering.

The whole self-sacrificing work of the disciples appears here as a mere result of the offering of Christ.' But it should be added, in further illustration of the vast difference between the sanctification of the Master and that of the servants, that He does not say, 'I sanctify Myself through the truth,' but simply, "I sanctify Myself," that is, 'set Myself apart by Self-consecration;' and while He says of His own sanctification that it was "for their sakes," He does not say that they were to be sanctified for others' sakes-though that, in a certain inferior and not unimportant sense, is true enough-but simply, "that they also might be sanctified through the truth." Thus, in language which brings His people into the nearest and most blessed conjunction with Himself-in a common sanctification-does Jesus, by sharpest lines of demarcation, distinguish between Himself and them in that sanctification.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-17.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

19. And for their sake. The purpose of Christ dedicating himself to the Father, was to bring the truth by and in which the disciples might be dedicated to the Father.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 17:19". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-17.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(19) And for their sakes I sanctify myself.—Comp. Note on John 17:17. The consecration here thought of is that to the work which was immediately before Him—the offering Himself as a sacrifice. The word was in frequent use in the special sense of an offering or sacrifice set apart to God. As a New Testament example of this, comp. Romans 15:16. By this consecration of Himself—which in a wider sense is for all men, but in the special sense is “for their sakes”—He will, as both Priest and Sacrifice, enter into the Holy of Holies of the heavenly temple, and will send the Holy Ghost, who will consecrate them.

That they also might be sanctified through the truth.—Better, as in the margin, . . . . might be truly sanctified. The words “they also” are emphatic, answering to “their sakes” and “myself” in the preceding clause.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth.
for
Isaiah 62:1; 2 Corinthians 4:15; 8:9; 1 Thessalonians 4:7; 2 Timothy 2:10
I sanctify
10:36; Jeremiah 1:5; 1 Corinthians 1:2; Hebrews 2:11; 9:13,18,26; 10:5-10,29
that
17; Titus 2:14
sanctified through the truth
or, truly sanctified.
Reciprocal: Exodus 29:21 - shall be;  Exodus 31:13 - that ye may;  Exodus 40:10 - sanctify;  Exodus 40:13 - anoint him;  Leviticus 4:34 - the horns of the altar;  Leviticus 8:22 - the ram of consecration;  Leviticus 14:29 - GeneralLeviticus 16:18 - GeneralLeviticus 21:8 - for I;  Numbers 7:15 - GeneralNumbers 8:17 - I sanctified;  Numbers 19:18 - GeneralJoshua 3:5 - Sanctify;  John 11:15 - for;  John 16:26 - that;  John 20:21 - as;  Romans 8:29 - to be;  1 Thessalonians 2:13 - effectually;  1 Thessalonians 5:23 - sanctify;  Hebrews 10:10 - we;  Hebrews 13:12 - sanctify;  1 Peter 1:22 - ye have;  1 Peter 2:9 - an holy

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 17:19". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-17.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

John 17:19

"And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth." John 17:19

Christ is made to his people sanctification ( 1 Corinthians 1:30). What am I? What are you? Are we not filthy, polluted, and defiled? Do not some of us, more or less, daily feel altogether as an unclean thing? Is not every thought of our heart altogether vile? Does any holiness, any spirituality, any heavenly-mindedness, any purity, any resemblance to the divine image dwell in our hearts by nature? Not a grain! Not an atom! How then can I, a polluted sinner, ever see the face of a holy God? How can I, a worm of earth, corrupted within and without by indwelling and committed sin, ever hope to see a holy God without shrinking into destruction?

I cannot see him, except so far as the Lord of life and glory is made sanctification to me. Why should men start so at "imputed sanctification?" Why should not Christ"s holiness be imputed to his people as well as Christ"s righteousness? Why should they not stand sanctified in him, as well as justified? Why not? Is there anything in Jesus, as God-man Mediator, which he has not for his people? Has he any perfection, any attribute, any gift, any blessing, which is not for their use? Did he not sanctify himself that they might be sanctified by the truth? Is he not the holy Lamb of God, that they might be "holy, and without blame before him in love?" What is my holiness, even such as God may be pleased to impart to me? Is it not, to say the least, scanty? Is it not, to say the least, but little in measure? But when we view the pure and spotless holiness of Jesus imputed to his people, and view them holy in him, pure in him, without spot in him, how it does away with all the wrinkles of the creature, and makes them stand holy and spotless before God.

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Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on John 17:19". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/john-17.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 19. "And for their sakes I sanctify Myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth."

The Father must assure to the disciples the means of true sanctification; because otherwise the Son would have vainly assumed His great undertaking. The thought of the preceding verse returns here in another form. To the sending Christ into the world, corresponds in this verse Christ's sanctification of Himself. The present is used, because the self-consecration which was to reach its climax in the Redeemer's atoning death still continues. (Calvin: This sanctification, although it pertained to the whole life of Christ, yet was most eminent in the sacrifice of His death.) The exclusive reference of the words to the impending sacrificial death (Bengel: Sanctifico me, mortem crucis tolerans), disturbs the connection with "As Thou hast sent Me into the world," which furnishes a comment on "I sanctify Myself," otherwise indefinite of itself; and it disturbs also the connection with ch. John 10:36. As there, so here also, sanctification is separation to the service of God in His kingdom. The only difference is, that in ch. 10. He who separates is God, while here it is Christ who separates Himself; and in that passage it may be observed that the sanctifying is simultaneous or coincides with the entrance into the world. "For them:" Christ sanctified Himself for the whole world, and His vocation He entered on as a Redeemer of all men; but the Apostles here come prominently into view, because the Lord is now praying for them, and their relations were central: comp. ver. 20. In ch. John 15:13 also, the atoning death of Christ is exhibited as undergone specifically for the Apostles.

After His prayer for the Apostles as to their position in the world, the Lord, in vers. 20-23, turns to the petition for believers in the same relation: comp. the ὁ κόσμος in vers. 21, 23. The transition to this part of the prayer we see in ver. 18, where the Lord had spoken of the sending of the Apostles into the world.

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Bibliographical Information
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 17:19". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-17.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

19.And for their sales I sanctify myself. By these words he explains more clearly from what source that sanctification flows, which is completed in us by the doctrine of the Gospel. It is, because he consecrated himself to the Father, that his holiness might come to us; for as the blessing on the first-fruits is spread over the whole harvest, so the Spirit of God cleanses us by the holiness of Christ and makes us partakers of it. Nor is this done by imputation only, for in that respect he is said to have been made to us righteousness; but he is likewise said to have been made to us sanctification, (1 Corinthians 1:30,) because he has, so to speak, presented us to his Father in his own person, that we may be renewed to true holiness by his Spirit. Besides, though this sanctification belongs to the whole life of Christ, yet the highest illustration of it was given in the sacrifice of his death; for then he showed himself to be the true High Priest, by consecrating the temple, the altar, all the vessels, and the people, by the power of his Spirit.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:19". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.