Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 17:9

I ask on their behalf; I do not ask on behalf of the world, but of those whom You have given Me; for they are Yours;
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus Continued;   Prayer;   Predestination;   Thompson Chain Reference - Ask;   Christ;   Christ's;   Church;   Family;   Importunity;   Intercession;   Moses;   Prayer;   Secret Prayer;   United Prayer;   Unwise Prayers;   Wicked, the;   The Topic Concordance - Belief;   Belonging;   Declaration;   Disciples/apostles;   Giving and Gifts;   Glory;   Hate;   Jesus Christ;   Judas Iscariot;   Knowledge;   Losing and Things Lost;   Love;   Manifestation;   Sanctification;   Sending and Those Sent;   Truth;   Unity;   Word of God;   World;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Holiness;   Prayer, Intercessory;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jesus christ;   Priest;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Mediator, Mediation;   Obedience;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Care of God;   Commentary;   Covenant;   Intercession of Christ;   Pre-Existence of Jesus Christ;   Predestination;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Hypostatic union;   Trinity;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Covenant;   Predestination;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Intercession;   Holman Bible Dictionary - John, the Gospel of;   Unity;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Children (Sons) of God;   Ephesians, Epistle to;   Prayer;   Sanctification, Sanctify;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Communion (2);   Death of Christ;   Elect, Election ;   Intercession;   Judas Iscariot (2);   Love;   Mental Characteristics;   Necessity;   Prayer (2);   Universalism (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - 20 To Ask, Request;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Body;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   Twelve Apostles, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Intercession;   Prayers of Jesus;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for December 16;   Every Day Light - Devotion for October 10;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

I pray not for the world - I am not yet come to that part of my intercession: see John 17:20. I am now wholly employed for my disciples, that they may be properly qualified to preach my salvation to the ends of the earth. Jesus here imitates the high priest, the second part of whose prayer, on the day of expiation, was for the priests, the sons of Aaron: see on John 17:1; (note). These words may also be understood as applying to the rebellious Jews. God's wrath was about to descend upon them, and Christ prays that his own followers might be kept from the evil, John 17:15. But he does not thus pray for the world, the rebellious Jews, because the cup of their iniquity was full, and their judgment slumbered not.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 17:9". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-17.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

I pray for them: I pray not for the world, but for those whom thou hast given me; for they are thine.

I pray not for the world ... This shift back to the present tense denotes that at that time Christ was not praying for the world but for his disciples. That Christ could not pray for his enemies in the same terms as for his own is natural; and, as Hovey said, "The blessings which he would ask for his enemies must be different in some respects from those which he would ask for his friends."[15] Lipscomb concurred, saying, "Jesus does not mean to say that the world is excluded from his sympathy; he was dying to save the world."[16] Later, Jesus prayed that the "world might believe" (John 17:20,21).

For they are thine ... The apostles were not merely Christ's any longer but were God's chosen representatives to deliver the saving gospel to humanity. It was that new status with which they were shortly to be endowed that required this special prayer to be uttered in their hearing. It has all the effect of the great commission. In this part of his prayer, Jesus prayed not for the world but for those men upon whom the salvation of the world depended.

[15] Alvah Hovey, op. cit., p. 340.

[16] David Lipscomb, op. cit., p. 264.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 17:9". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-17.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I pray for them,.... This is to be understood of Christ, not as God; for as such he is the object of prayer; nor need he pray to any other; nor is there any superior to him under that consideration to pray unto; but as man and Mediator: nor is his praying any argument against his deity; nor proof of inferiority to his Father with respect to his divine nature; since it is not in that, but in his human, nature, that he prayed; though this may be ascribed to his whole person as Godman; hence he had the greatest qualifications and abilities for this work, and his prayers were always heard: praying, as attributed to Christ, must be restrained to his state of humiliation; prayer is never spoken of Christ but whilst he was here on earth; his intercession in heaven is never expressed by prayer; and the saints when they come thither, will have done praying, Christ whilst on earth, was an excellent pattern of prayer; of private and solitary prayer; of social prayer; for and with his disciples; of frequent and fervent prayer; of submission to the will of God in prayer; and of praying even for enemies: the persons he is here said to pray for are his apostles; which shows their danger and their wants, his care over them, and concern for them, and his love unto them:

I pray not for the world; the inhabitants of it, the carnal unbelieving part of the world, which lie in sin, and will be condemned; as he died not for them, so he prayed not for them; for whom he is the propitiation, he is an advocate; and for whom he died, he makes intercession; and for no other in a spiritual saving way:

but for them which thou hast given me; out of the world, as distinct from them, to be saved with an everlasting salvation by him; and to be preserved safe to his kingdom and glory; for these he prays, for the conversion of them, the application of pardon to them, their final perseverance and eternal glory:

for they are thine; not merely by creation, and as the care of his providence, but by eternal election, and special grace in calling; which is a reason why Christ prayed for them, and an argument why the Father should, and would regard his prayers.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 17:9". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-17.html. 1999.

People's New Testament

I pray for them. The apostles. The prayer from John 17:9-19 is for these.

I pray not for the world. Not at this time; he came into the world to save it, and we are not to conclude that he would never pray for its conversion and welfare, Now, however, his petition is confined to the apostles, the little band who are hanging upon his words.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 17:9". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-17.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

I pray (εγω ερωτωegō erōtō). Request, not question, as in John 16:23.

Not for the world (ου περι του κοσμουou peri tou kosmou). Now at this point in the prayer Christ means. In John 17:19 Jesus does pray for the world (for future believers) that it may believe (John 17:21). God loves the whole world (John 3:16). Christ died for sinners (Romans 5:8) and prayed for sinners (Luke 23:34) and intercedes for sinners (1 John 2:1.; Romans 8:34; Hebrews 7:25).

For those whom
(περι ωνperi hōn). A condensed and common Greek idiom for περι τουτων ουςperi toutōn hous with τουτωνtoutōn (the demonstrative antecedent) omitted and the relative ουςhous attracted from the accusative ουςhous (object of δεδωκαςdedōkas) to the case (genitive) of the omitted antecedent.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 17:9". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-17.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

I pray ( ἐρωτῶ )

More strictly, I make request. See on John 16:23. The I is emphatic, as throughout the prayer.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 17:9". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-17.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

I pray for them: I pray not for the world, but for them which thou hast given me; for they are thine.

I pray not for the world — Not in these petitions, which are adapted to the state of believers only. (He prays for the world at John 17:21,23, that they may believe - That they may know God hath sent him.) This no more proves that our Lord did not pray for the world, both before and afterward, than his praying for the apostles alone, John 17:6-19, proves that he did not pray for them also which shall believe through their word, John 17:20.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 17:9". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-17.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

for the words which thou gavest me I have given unto them; and they received [them]1, and knew of a truth that I came forth from thee, and they believed that thou didst send me2.

  1. For the words which thou gavest me I have given unto them; and they received [them]. As a second reason for blessing the disciples, Jesus pleads their reception and retention of the truth which the Father had sent him to reveal, and the resulting knowledge and faith.

  2. And knew of a truth that I came forth from thee, and they believed that thou didst send me. The truth revealed by Jesus was so palpably divine that the disciples could know that its bearer came from heaven. But whether that bearer came of his own volition or as a commissioned messenger of the Father they could not know. But where knowledge was impossible, they trusted to Jesus and believed.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 17:9". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-17.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Я о них молю. До сих пор Христос говорил о том, что может снискать ученикам Божие благоволение. Теперь же Он переходит к самой молитве, в которой показывает: Он не просит ничего, кроме того, что согласно с Отчей волей. Ведь Он молит Отца лишь о тех, кого добровольно возлюбил Сам Отец. Христос прямо отрицает, что молится за мир. Ведь Он заботится лишь о Собственном стаде, которое принял из рук Отца. Однако это может показаться глупым. Ведь самая лучшая форма молитвы – следовать примеру, показанному Христом. Однако нам велено молиться за всех. Кроме того, впоследствии Христос также без различия молился за всех, говоря «Отче! прости им, ибо не знают, что делают». Отвечаю: молитвы, которые мы возносим за всех, все же ограничены избранными Божиими. Мы должны желать спасения тому или иному человеку, и даже каждому в отдельности. Таким образом, сюда включается весь человеческий род, ибо мы не можем отличать избранных от отверженных. Между тем, мы одновременно молимся о наступлении царствия Божия, когда Он истребит Своих врагов. Различие в следующем: мы молимся о спасении всех тех, о ком знаем: они сотворены по образу Божию и имеют одинаковую с нами природу. Погибель же некоторых мы оставляем суду Божию. Тех, кого Он сам считает отверженными. Приведенная же здесь молитва имела под собой особое основание и посему не может служить примером. Ибо Христос молится здесь не только из чувства веры и любви, но, войдя в тайники неба, ясно видит тайные Отчие суды, сокрытые от нас, покуда мы странствуем через веру. Кроме того, из Его слов мы заключаем: Бог избрал от мира наследниками жизни тех, кого Ему было угодно избрать. И различие здесь кроется не в человеческих заслугах, а только лишь в Его благоволении. Ведь тем, кто причину избрания усматривает в людях, надлежит начинать с веры. Однако Христос открыто провозглашает, что данные Ему люди принадлежали Отцу. Несомненно же, что даны они Ему для того, чтобы уверовать. И вера как раз проистекает из этого дара. Если же начало веры есть само дарование Христу, а избрание по порядку и по времени ему предшествует, то нам остается лишь признать: тех, кого Бог желает уберечь от мира, Он избрал даром. Поскольку же Христос молится за одних избранных, нам необходимо верить в это избрание, если мы желаем, чтобы Он заботился о нашем спасении. Итак, большой вред причиняют верующим те, кто пытается уничтожить в их душах знание об избрании; вред, состоящий в том, что они лишают их тем самым помощи Христовой. Кроме того, этими словами опровергается извращенная глупость тех, кто под предлогом избрания предается лени. Скорее оно должно вызвать в них молитвенное усердие, как учит этому Христос.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:9". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

world

kosmos = world-system. John 17:14; John 17:16; John 7:7. (See Scofield "Revelation 13:8").

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on John 17:9". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/john-17.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

9 I pray for them: I pray not for the world, but for them which thou hast given me; for they are thine.

Ver. 9. I pray for them] Christ hath left us this prayer here recorded, as a pattern of that intercession he incessantly maketh for us at the right hand of his heavenly Father. Joab was heard for Absalom: shall not Christ for us? Solomon denied his mother’s request, 1 Kings 2:22; God will not deny Christ’s. The prodigal came without a mediator to his father, and was embraced; much more shall we, presented by Christ.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 17:9". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-17.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

That is, "I now offer up a prayer particularly, 1. For my apostles, designed for so great a work as the preaching of the everlasting gospel to the obstinate Jews and obdurate Gentiles.

2. I intercede also for all believers at this time, for their perseverance in the faith, and constancy in persecution, but I do not now intercede for the wicked and impenitent world, they not being capable (whilst such) of these mercies and blessings;" though at other times we find him praying for the world, yea, for his very crucifiers: Father, forgive them, &c.

Nay, in this very prayer, at the 20th verse, he prays for the world; that is, for the Gentile world; all those that, by the preaching of the apostles and their successors, should be brought to believe on him to the end of the world.

Learn hence, 1. That the Lord Jesus Christ is the great and gracious intercessor.

2. That all believers, all the children of God in general, are under the fruit and benefit of Christ's intercession.

3. That as all the members of Christ in general, so the ministers and ambassadors of Christ in special, have a particular interest in Christ's intercession: and great are the advantages of his intercession for them.

1. From the person interceding, Christ: consider the dignity of his person, God-man: the dearness of his person, God's son.

2. From the manner of his intercession: not by way of entreaty, but meritorious claim.

3. From the sublimity of his office: our intercessor is near to God, even at his right hand.

4. From the fruits of his intercession: it procures the acceptance and justification of our persons, the hearing and answering of our prayers, the pardon and forgiveness of our sins, our preservation in grace, and our hopes of eternal glory.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 17:9". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-17.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

9.] Stier remarks, that the Lord here begins to fulfil His promise Matthew 10:32.

οὐ περὶ τ. κόσμου ἐρ.] The misconceptions which have been made of this verse (Calvin, Lampe, and even Luther, who elsewhere corrects himself, see Tholuck on John, edn. 6, p. 352) as implying a decree of exclusion for the vessels of wrath, may be at once removed by considering the usage of ὁ κόσμος in this Prayer. The Lord does pray distinctly for ὁ κόσμος, John 17:21; John 17:23, that they may believe and know that the Father hath sent Him. He cannot therefore mean here that He does not pray (absolutely) for the world, but that He is not now asking for the world, does not pray this thing for the world. These ( οὓς δέδωκάς μοι) have already believed and known; the prayer for them is therefore a different one, viz. that in John 17:11; John 17:15. The mistake would be at once precluded for English readers by the paraphrase, I am praying for them; I am not praying for the world.

ὅτι σοί εἰσιν—in a fuller sense than σοὶ ἦσαν, John 17:6. That was their preparation for Christ; this is their abiding in Him, which is abiding in the Father, see next verse.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 17:9". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-17.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

John 17:9. I pray for them! Both in ἐγώ and in περὶ αὐτῶν there lies a motive element in reference to God. That which lies in περὶ αὐτῶν is then further made specially prominent, first negatively ( οὐ π. τ. κόσμ. ἐρ.), and then positively ( ἀλλὰ περὶ, κ. τ. λ.).

οὐ περὶ τοῦ κόσμου] has no dogmatic weight, and is therefore not to be explained in the sense of the condemnation of the world (Melanchthon), or of absolute predestination (Calvin, Jansen, Lampe), or of the negation of such intercession in general (Hengstenberg), but refers simply and solely to this present intercession, which has in truth no relation to those who are strangers to God, but to His own, whom He has given to Jesus,—and this should all the more move Him to fulfil the prayers. Prayer for the unbelieving has been enjoined by Jesus Himself (Matthew 5:44), and was, moreover, offered by Himself upon the cross (Luke 23:34), and for them did He die, comp. also John 17:20; but here He has only the disciples in view, and lays them, by the antithesis οὐ περὶ τ. κόσμου, the more earnestly on the Father’s heart. Luther well says: “At other times one should pray for the world, that it may be converted.” Comp. John 17:21.

ὅτι σοί εἰσι] Ground of the intercession: because they—although given to me—are Thine, belonging to Thee as my believing ones, since they were Thine (John 17:6) already, before Thou gavest them to me.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on John 17:9". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/john-17.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 17:9. περὶ αὐτῶν, for [concerning] them) Jesus prays for believers: He Himself and believers pray for the world.— οὐ περὶ τοῦ κόσμου, not for the world) This ought not to be taken absolutely: Comp. v. 21, 23, “That the world may believe—know—that Thou hast sent Me.”(370) But what is meant is that Jesus does not pray for the world at this time, and in this place, and with these words, which were applicable to believers alone, John 17:11; John 17:15; John 17:17. Christ says the same things in Psalms 16:3-4, “The saints that are in the earth, and the excellent in whom is all My delight;” and of the ungodly, “I will not take up their names into My lips.” He does not, however, exclude the world [from His prayers], when He commends the disciples chosen out of the world.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 17:9". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-17.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The world seemeth here to signify all mankind, for whom Christ in this place doth not pray; though some interpret it of reprobates, others of unbelievers. Christ afterward prays for the world, John 17:20; that is, for such who, though they at present were unbelievers, yet should be brought to believe by the apostles’ ministry. But to teach us to distinguish in our prayer, our Saviour here distinguishes, and prays for some things for his chosen ones, which he doth not pray for on the behalf of others: these he describes to be such as his Father (whose they were) had given him, either by an eternal donation, or by working faith in them.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 17:9". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-17.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

I pray for them; his disciples.

Not for the world; the wicked. He did not at this time pray for his enemies, but for his friends.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 17:9". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-17.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

9.Pray not for the world—For the world, as such, and while it stays such, (in the sense used here and in John 17:14,) is not a possible object of the mercies and blessings he is now imploring; and so cannot be the object of his direct prayer. Indirectly he prays, in John 17:21; John 17:23, for the world, that it may be brought under the scope and cover of his prayer, by conversion to faith in him. When Christ intercedes, as here, for his Church, it is that it may be, as here, preserved, sanctified, and glorified. When he prays for the world, it is that it may be converted and forgiven. Luke xxiii, 34. Then the world comes into the Church, and receives the blessing of Christ’s Church by intercession.

For them which thou hast given me—The apostles, as in John 17:6; John 17:8.

They are thine—The Father gave them, yet still retained them. They were the common property of God and of Christ. Therefore did Christ confidently pray for them.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 17:9". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-17.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 17:9. I ask concerning them; I ask not concerning the world, but concerning them which thou hast given me. In the preceding verses the mind of Jesus has been filled with the thought of the position of the disciples: He now proceeds directly to pray for them; and the substance of His prayer is that they, occupying His place, may be so preserved as to be what He had been,—true to the word given them, victorious over the devil, consecrated, filled with joy, to His glory and the glory of the Father in Him. So fully, too, are His thoughts occupied with them, that the whole energy of His prayer is devoted to them alone. He will not for the present ask concerning the enemy to be assailed, but about the assailants who are to take His place. Without denouncing the ‘world,’ therefore, He simply sets it aside. It may indeed be asked, Why mention it at all? The answer probably is, to bring out that perfect correspondence between the will of the Son and of the Father, which is the ground of the Son’s confidence in prayer. Hence the emphatic ‘I’ with which the verse begins,—‘I, who came forth from the Father, who am sent of the Father (John 17:8); I, who am the perfect expression of the Father, willing only what He wills,—I do not go beyond those whom He has given Me.’ This last thought then finds utterance.

Because they are thine. In John 17:6 it had been ‘They were thine:’ then they had been looked at only as the possession of the Father. Now ‘they are thine:’ they have been brought back to Him and united to Him in a closer, dearer bond than ever,—the bond of fellowship in the Son.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 17:9". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-17.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

I pray for them, I pray not for the world. That is, now in this prayer, when I desire special graces and assistances for them, to discharge their duty, as my apostles; yet we must take notice, that (ver. 20.) Christ prays for all those, who should believe in him. He also prayed (Luke xxiii. 34.) for all, even for those that crucified him, Father, forgive the, for they know not what they do. (Witham) --- The prayer I now offer up to thee, O my Father, is all in behalf of my disciples, it is not for the world. I pray not now for the incredulous Jews, nor for such of the Gentiles as shall afterwards believe in me; for them I will pray at another time. At present I speak to thee for my apostles only: they call for my first care, because they are thine, and thou has given them to me. (Calmet) --- Jesus Christ prayed with an absolute and an efficacious prayer, for all those, for whom his prayer was to be heard: he begged for them, whatever his Father had predestined to give them; but he asked for nothing, that his Father had predestined not to give them.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 17:9". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-17.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

pray = ask. Greek. erotao. App-134. The Lord uses this word eight times in these chapters: John 14:16; John 16:5, John 16:23, John 16:26; John 17:9, John 17:9, John 17:15, John 17:20. The word aiteo, used of an inferior addressing a superior, Occurs John 14:13, John 14:14; John 15:7, John 15:16; John 16:23, John 16:24, John 16:24, John 16:26. Compare Mark 15:43 (crave), Luke 23:52 (beg).

for = concerning. Greek. peri. App-104. not. Greek. ou. App-105.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 17:9". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-17.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

I pray for them: I pray not for the world, but for them which thou hast given me; for they are thine.

I pray for them - not here as apostles, but as the following words show, as the representatives of those "chosen out of the world."

I pray not for the world - for the things sought for them were totally inapplicable to the world. Not that the individuals composing the world were shut out from Christ's compassions (see the last clause of John 17:21), or ought to be shut out from ours; but they come within the sphere of this prayer only by "being chosen out of the world."

But for them which thou hast given me; for they are thine. He had just said that the Father "gave them to Him;" but here He says they were the Father's still, for the Father did not give them out of His own hands in committing them to the Son's. See the notes at John 10:28-30. Accordingly He adds,

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 17:9". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-17.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

9. I pray for them. His prayer from John 17:9-19 is for the apostles. I do not pray for the world. He sets the world aside for the present, to pray specifically for his apostles. Luther says: “To pray for the world, and not to pray for the world, must both be right and good. For soon after He says Himself: ‘Neither pray I for those alone, but for them also who shall believe on me’.”

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 17:9". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-17.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(9) I pray for them: I pray not for the world.—Better, I am praying for them: I am not praying for the world. Both pronouns are emphatic. “I who have during my work on earth taught them;” “they who have received the truth” (John 17:8). “I who am about to leave the world;” “they who will remain in the world” (John 17:11). The tense is the strict present, referring to the prayer which He is at this moment uttering, and not to His general practice, which the Authorised version may be taken to express. Against any limitation of the prayer of our Lord, see John 17:21, and His own prayer for His enemies, “Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do” (Luke 23:34). Comp. also His command to His disciples to pray for “them which despitefully used them” (Matthew 5:44). The present prayer was like that which pious Rabbis were accustomed to offer for their pupils. (Comp. Schöttgen’s Note here.) It is from its very nature applicable only to disciples. He is leaving them, and commends them to His Father’s care.

But for them which thou hast given me; for they are thine.—This is the special claim on which He commends them to the Father. They were the Father’s before they were given to the Son. By that gift they have become the Father’s more fully (John 17:6-8). They are the Father’s, for all things which are the Son’s are the Father’s, and all things which are the Father’s are the Son’s (John 17:10).

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 17:9". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-17.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I pray for them: I pray not for the world, but for them which thou hast given me; for they are thine.
pray for
14:16; 16:26,27; Luke 22:32; 8:34; Hebrews 7:25; 9:24; 1 John 2:1,2; 5:19; Revelation 12:9; 13:8; 20:15
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 8:59 - nigh;  2 Kings 2:9 - Ask what;  Malachi 3:17 - they shall;  Matthew 12:49 - his disciples;  John 6:37 - that;  John 10:29 - which;  John 12:23 - The hour;  John 13:1 - having;  John 17:6 - the men;  Acts 27:23 - whose;  Romans 8:9 - he is;  1 Corinthians 3:23 - ye;  1 Corinthians 5:10 - of this;  2 Timothy 1:9 - which;  2 Timothy 2:10 - for;  1 John 5:16 - I do not

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 17:9". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-17.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 9. "I pray for them: I pray not for the world, but for them which Thou hast given Me; for they are Thine."

He does not say, "I pray not not for the world," nor "I pray not in the same sense;" but generally, "I pray not for the world." This shows that the world, as such, is simply shut out from the grace of God; that to pray for it would not be according to the will of God; that 1 John 5:16 holds good of the world, "There is a sin unto death: I do not say that he shall pray for it." The world may be viewed under two aspects. First, there is the susceptibility of grace, which, despite the depth of the sinful depravation of Adam's race, still remains in it. Of the world in this sense, Jesus says, "I came not into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world:" comp. ch. John 1:29, John 3:17, John 4:42. Viewed under this aspect, the world is the object of Christ's intercession. The disciples themselves were won from the world. But the world may also be viewed as ruled by predominantly ungodly principles. Of the world in this sense, we read in ch. John 14:17, that it could not receive the Spirit of truth. To pray for the world, thus viewed, would be as vain as to pray for the "prince of this world." It is an object not to be prayed for, but to be prayed against. To it apply all those objurgations in the so-called cursing psalms, which our Lord so emphatically and so repeatedly quoted and acknowledged as the word of God. Of that world Psalms 79:10 says: "Let Him be known among the heathen in our sight, by the revenging of the blood of Thy servants which is shed." To it applies the word of Revelation 6:10 : "And they cried with a loud voice, saying, How long, O Lord, holy and true, dost Thou not judge and avenge our blood on them that dwell on the earth?" Luther gives us what is in all essentials the right view: "But how can the two be reconciled. His not praying for the world here, and His commanding us, in Matthew 5, to pray for our enemies? The answer is ready: to pray for the world, and not to pray for the world, must both be right and good. As the world now stands, and as it rages against the Gospel, He will in no way have it prayed for, that God should wink at and suffer its evil nature and ways; but we must pray against it, that God would hinder its projects, and bring them to nought. So Moses did, Numbers 16:15, against Korah and his company: he was very wroth, and said unto the Lord, Respect not Thou their offering. Thus Christ shows us here the two companies: the first and small one, which keeps and must preach the word of God; and the greater one, which aims to thwart that little flock in everything." Similarly Quesnel: "The world, that corporation of the wicked, which stands fast and ever will stand fast, though individuals of its members may be snatched from it, remains under the curse, and is treated as under the ban, as having no part in the sacrifice of Christ, and therefore none in His intercession. What an idea this must give us of the world!"

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 17:9". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-17.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

9.I pray for them. Hitherto Christ has brought forward what might procure for the disciples favor with the Father. He now forms the prayer itself, in which he shows that he asks nothing but what is agreeable to the will of the Father, because he pleads with the Father in behalf of those only whom the Father himself willingly loves. He openly declares that he does not pray for the world, because he has no solicitude but about his own flock, which he received from the hand of the Father. But this might be thought to be absurd; for no better rule of prayer can be found than to follow Christ as our Guide and Teacher. Now, we are commanded to pray for all, (Titus 2:8) and Christ himself afterwards prayed indiscriminately for all,

Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do,
(
Luke 23:34.)

I reply, the prayers which we offer for all are still limited to the elect of God. We ought to pray that this man, and that man, and every man, may be saved, and thus include the whole human race, because we cannot yet distinguish the elect from the reprobate; and yet, while we desire the coming of the kingdom of God, we likewise pray that God may destroy his enemies.

There is only this difference between the two cases, that we pray for the salvation of all whom we know to have been created after the image of God, and who have the same nature with ourselves; and we leave to the judgment of God those whom he knows to be reprobate. But in the prayer which is here related there was some special reason, which ought not to be produced as an example; for Christ does not now pray from the mere impulse of faith and of love towards men, but, entering into the heavenly sanctuary, he places before his eyes the secret judgments of the Father, which are concealed from us, so long as we walk by faith.

Besides, we learn from these words, that God chooses out of the world those whom he thinks fit to choose to be heirs of life, and that this distinction is not made according to the merit of men, but depends on his mere good-pleasure. For those who think that the cause of election is in men must begin with faith. Now, Christ expressly declares that they who are given to him belong to the Father; and it is certain that they are given so as to believe, and that faith flows from this act of giving. If the origin of faith is this act of giving, and if election comes before it in order and time, what remains but that we acknowledge that those whom God wishes to be saved out of the world are elected by free grace? Now since Christ prays for the elect only, it is necessary for us to believe the doctrine of election, if we wish that he should plead with the Father for our salvation. A grievous injury, therefore, is inflicted on believers by those persons who endeavor to blot out the knowledgeof election from the hearts of believers, because they deprive them of the pleading and intercession of the Son of God. (116) These words serve also to expose the stupidity of those who, under the pretence of election, give themselves up to the indolence, whereas it ought rather to arouse us to earnestness in prayer, as Christ teaches us by his example.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 17:9". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-17.html. 1840-57.