Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 19:40

So they took the body of Jesus and bound it in linen wrappings with the spices, as is the burial custom of the Jews.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus, the Christ;   Joseph;   Love;   Spices;   Thompson Chain Reference - Dead, the;   Embalming;   Grave-Clothes;   Nicodemus;   Spices;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Burial;   Dead, the;   Embalming;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Joseph;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Funeral;   Joseph of arimathea;   Nicodemus;   Pharisees;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Burial;   Disciple, Discipleship;   Fruit;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Christianity;   Humiliation of Christ;   Jesus Christ;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Embalming;   Spices;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Burial;   Embalm;   Spices;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Embalming;   Ethics;   Jesus, Life and Ministry of;   John, the Gospel of;   Joseph;   Nicodemus;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Joseph;   Linen;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Anointing (2);   Burial;   Dress (2);   Grave-Clothes;   Jews;   Joseph (2);   Lazarus;   Linen (2);   Spices ;   Trade and Commerce;   Weaving;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Embalming;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Anointing;   Embalming;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Spice, Spices;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Joseph;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Custom (2);   Dress;   Johannine Theology, the;   Joseph of Arimathaea;   Linen;   Manner;   Nicodemus;   Oil;   Spice;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Burial and sepulchers;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Wound it in linen - See on John 11:44; (note).

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 19:40". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-19.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

So they took the body of Jesus and bound it in linen cloths with the spices, as the custom of the Jews is to bury.

Throughout John, there appears the most exact and intimate knowledge of Jewish customs, proving that the author could have been none other than a Jew.

Linen cloths ... The word "cloths" does not mean "clothes," nor "a linen cloth," such as was mentioned by all three synoptics, according to Westcott. This is the type of "discrepancy" seized upon with such glee by skeptics, there being several other examples in the sacred Gospels. There ARE discrepancies, of a sort; but they are far more effective in establishing the truth and dependability of the Gospels than any VERBATIM narratives could have been. Even the points of apparent disagreement, when carefully studied, reveal deeper insights into the facts.

CONCERNING THE CLOTHS

As Westcott noted, "The exact word for CLOTHS is the diminutive form which is used in Greek medical writings for BANDAGES. This distinguishes these SWATHES in which the body was bound from the linen cloth mentioned by the other evangelists."[23]

Observe this total record of all four Gospels:

Joseph took the body, and wrapped it in a clean linen cloth (Matthew 27:59). Joseph bought a linen cloth, and taking him down, wound him in the linen cloth (Mark 15:46). Joseph took the body down and wrapped it in a linen cloth (Luke 23:53). Joseph and Nicodemus took the body of Jesus and bound it in linen cloths with the spices (John 19:40).

Thus, Joseph in the lead, and joined by Nicodemus a little later, after the latter had bought the spices, received Pilate's permission to take the body. Did they wrap, wind, or bind the body with that linen cloth? They did all three. Did they keep that linen cloth in one piece while that was done? Certainly not. They first cut it into SWATHES, as John said, making medical bandages of the type one can still see on the body of the old Israel himself in the Cave of Macpelah! As John tells us, "as the custom of the Jews is to bury." If such is not what happened, the synoptics would merely have said, "They rolled him up in a sheet." On the contrary, they used three different verbs: wrapped, wound, and bound. Any fair interpretation requires the inference of what John here declared as fact, namely, that the linen cloth was first reduced to medical type bandages used in winding up the bodies of the dead. Those who seek a contradiction in God's word must seek it elsewhere.

But there is a great deal more to this. The astounding miracle of the grave clothes was about to be related, the validity and impact of which depended utterly upon an exact understanding of what the grave clothes were and how they were applied. That is WHY John gave more exact details than the synoptics who did not record that miracle.

ENDNOTE:

[23] B. F. Westcott, op. cit., p. 281.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 19:40". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-19.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then took they the body of Jesus,.... It being taken down from the cross, and carried to the designed place of interment; they, Joseph and Nicodemus, either themselves, or by their servants, took the body;

and wound it in linen clothes; or "swathed", or "wrapped it in linen"; rolled it about the body many times, as was the custom of the eastern nations to do; this was what Joseph prepared:

with the spices; which they either wrapped up with the linen, or strowed over the body when it was wound up; these Nicodemus brought;

as the manner of the Jews is to bury; both was usual with them; both to wind up the dead in linen; hence R. Jonathan, alluding to this custom, when R. Isai was taken, and others would have delivered him, said, יכרך המת בסדינו, "let the dead be wrapped in his own linenF4T. Hieros. Ternmot, fol. 46. 2. "; and also to bury them with spices; hence we read of "the spices of the dead" in a Jewish canonF5Misn. Beracot. c. 8. sect. 6. :

"they do not say a blessing over a lamp, nor over the spices of idolaters; nor over a lamp, nor over הבשמים של מתים, "the spices of the dead":'

the use of which, Bartenora on the place says, was to drive away an ungrateful smell. The wrapping up the body of Christ in a fine linen cloth, was a token of his purity and innocence; and significative of that pure and spotless righteousness he had now brought in: the strewing it with spices may denote the fragrancy of Christ's death to Jehovah the Father, in whose sight it was precious, and whose sacrifice to him is of a sweet smelling savour; and also to all sensible sinners, to whom a crucified Christ is precious; since by his death sin is expiated, the law fulfilled, justice satisfied, reconciliation made, security from condemnation obtained, and death is abolished.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 19:40". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-19.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Then took they the body of Jesus, and wound it in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury — the mixed and pulverized myrrh and aloes shaken into the folds, and the entire body, thus swathed, wrapt in an outer covering of “clean linen cloth” (Matthew 27:59). Had the Lord‘s own friends had the least reason to think that the spark of life was still in Him, would they have done this? But even if one could conceive them mistaken, could anyone have lain thus enveloped for the period during which He was in the grave, and life still remained? Impossible. When, therefore, He walked forth from the tomb, we can say with the most absolute certainty, “Now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the first-fruits of them that slept” (1 Corinthians 15:20). No wonder that the learned and the barbarians alike were prepared to die for the name of the Lord Jesus; for such evidence was to the unsophisticated resistless. (No mention is made of anointing in this operation. No doubt it was a hurried proceeding, for fear of interruption, and because it was close on the sabbath, the women seem to have set this as their proper task “as soon as the sabbath should be past” [Mark 16:1 ]. But as the Lord graciously held it as undesignedly anticipated by Mary at Bethany [Mark 14:8 ], so this was probably all the anointing, in the strict sense of it, which He received.)

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 19:40". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-19.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

In linen cloths (οτονιοιςothoniois). Late diminutive for the old οτονηothonē used for ships‘ sails, in N.T. here and Luke 24:12. Case here either locative or instrumental.

With the spices (μετα των αρωματωνmeta tōn arōmatōn). Late word αρωμαarōma for spices, from fumes.

To bury
(ενταπιαζεινentaphiazein). Late verb, from ενταπιαentaphia (εν ταποςen class="translit"> taphos) the burial preparations of all sorts (flowers, perfumes, etc.), in N.T. only here and Matthew 26:12.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 19:40". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-19.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Linen cloths ( ὀθονίοις )

Used only by John, if Luke 24:12is rejected, as by some editors. The Synoptists all have σινδών , linen cloth. See on Mark 14:51. Matthew and Luke have ἐντύλιξεν , rolled or wrapped, and Mark ἐνείλησεν , wound, instead of John's ἔδησαν bound With the spices

Spread over the sheet or bandages in which the body was wrapped.

The manner of the Jews

As contrasted with that of the Egyptians, for instance, which is thus described by Herodotus: “They take first a crooked piece of iron, and with it draw out the brains through the nostrils, thus getting rid of a portion, while the skull is cleared of the rest by rinsing with drugs; next they make a cut along the flank with a sharp Ethiopian stone, and take out the whole contents of the abdomen, which they then cleanse, washing it thoroughly with palm-wine, and again, frequently with an infusion of pounded aromatics. After this they fill the cavity with the purest bruised myrrh, with cassia, and every other sort of spicery except frankincense, and sew up the opening. Then the body is placed in natrum (subcarbonate of soda) for seventy days, and covered entirely over. After the expiration of that space of time, which must not be exceeded, the body is washed, and wrapped round, from head to foot, with bandages of fine linen cloth, smeared over with gum” (ii., 86). Or, possibly, a contrast may be implied with the Roman custom of burning the bodies of the dead. Tacitus says of the Jews: “The bodies of the deceased they choose rather to bury than burn, following in this the Egyptian custom; with whom also they agree in their attention to the dead” (“History,” v., 5).

To bury ( ἐνταφιάζειν )

Properly, to prepare for burial. See on John 12:7. Compare Septuagint, Genesis 1:2, where the same word is used for embalming the body of Joseph.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 19:40". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-19.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

So they took the body of Jesus, and bound it in linen cloths with the spices, as the custom of the Jews is to bury1.

  1. So they took the body of Jesus, and bound it in linen cloths with the spices, as the custom of the Jews is to bury. Thus two members of the Sanhedrin unite to bury Jesus, each showing reverence in his own way: Joseph by buying a sindon instead of cheaper cloth (Mark 15:46), and Nicodemus by a wonderful wealth of spices (John 19:39). Possibly the heart of Nicodemus smote him for his tardiness in honoring Christ, and he desired to appease his conscience by giving the Lord a royal burial.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 19:40". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-19.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Как обыкновенно погребают Иудеи. После того, как Христос претерпел крестное поношение, Бог восхотел с почетом похоронить Его, дабы это послужило прелюдией к славному воскресению. Никодим и Иосиф немало и, как кажется, излишне потратились. Но здесь надо принять во внимание Божий замысел. Бог побудил их Своим Духом оказать Сыну подобную честь, дабы ужас креста затмило благоухание могилы. Кроме того, то, что предпринимается в чрезвычайных обстоятельствах, не может служить общим примером. И потом Евангелист особо упоминает о том, что Христос был погребен по иудейскому обычаю. Он хочет сказать, что это был один из обрядов закона. Ведь древний народ не имел ясного свидетельства о воскресении, не видел его залога во Христе Иисусе, посему его веру надлежало подкреплять подобными средствами, дабы она постоянно ожидала прихода Посредника. Надо отметить разницу между нами, кому воссияла евангельская истина, и отцами, которым образы восполняли отсутствие Христово. Это и объясняет, почему тогда обрядовая помпа была терпимой, а сегодня является порочной. Ведь те, кто сегодня столь суеверно погребает мертвецов, кладут в могилы не столько людей, сколько Самого Христа, Царя жизни. При этом они как бы стаскивают Его с небес, ибо воскресение упразднило все ветхие церемонии. В народах царит большое попечение и благоговение в отношении погребальных дел. Это без сомнения берет начало от отцов, как и жертвоприношения. Но поскольку у них не было надежды на воскресение, эти люди скорее обезьянничали, нежели подражали отцам. Обетование и Слово Божие служат как бы душою, оживотворяющей обряды. Если же люди пользуются обрядами вопреки Слову, обряды эти, хотя бы по внешнему виду и были благочестивы, есть не что иное, как глупое суеверие. Нам же, как было сказано, сегодня приличествует трезвенность и бережливость, ибо чрезмерные траты затмевают благоухание воскресения Христова.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 19:40". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-19.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

40 Then took they the body of Jesus, and wound it in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury.

Ver. 40. With the spices, as the manner of the Jews] To testify their hope of a resurrection. In an apish imitation of whom, the Gentiles also, though they had no such hope, kept a great stir, and made much ado about the decent burial of their dead. Habent et vespae favos, et simiae imitantur homines, saith Cyprian.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 19:40". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-19.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 19:40. Then took they the body Those who have written upon the manners and customs of the Jews, tell us, that they sometimes embalmed their dead with an aromatic mixture of myrrh, aloes, and other gums or spices; whichthey rubbed on the body more or less profusely, according to their circumstances, and their regard to the dead. After anointing the body, they covered it with a shroud or winding-sheet, then wrapped a napkin round its head and face; others say round the forehead only, because the Egyptian mummies are observed to have it so. Last of all, they swathed the shroudround the body, as tightly as possible, with proper bandages made of linen; which are the linen clothes mentioned in this verse, different from the clean linen cloth mentioned by the other evangelists. See Matthew 27:59. At other times they covered the whole body in a heap of spices: thus it is said of Asa, 2 Chronicles 16:14. They laid him in the bed, which was filled with sweet odours, and divers kinds of spices, prepared by the apothecary's art. From the quantity of myrrh and aloes made use of by Joseph and Nicodemus, namely, an hundred pound weight, it would appear that the office performed to their Master was of this latter kind; for they had not time to embalm him properly: they seem, however, to have done all that was usual in such circumstances to persons of wealth and distinction, which, as well as the sepulchre itself, accorded with Isaiah's prophesy, Isaiah 53:9. As none of the other evangelistshadmentionedthe spices with which the body was embalmed, John might choose to observe that circumstance, the better to obviate the false report which then prevailed among the Jews, that the body of our Lord had been stolen away in the night by his disciples: for, could they have been supposed so weak, as to lose time in attempting to take off the linen, both from the body and head, it must have clung so fast by means of the viscous nature of the spices, as to have put it out of their power to do it in such a manner as it was found in the sepulchre; the napkin, which was bound about his head, lying not with the linen clothes, but wrapped in a place by itself, ch. John 20:7 as if the body had miraculously slipped out of it, which was the real fact. The other evangelists indeed take notice, that the women afterwards carried spices to the sepulchre: for as Joseph and Nicodemus doubtless embalmed the body privately, after it was carried from the cross, the women, as they were not present, might know nothing of it; and, considering the shortness of the time, they might imagine nothing of that kind had been done, and therefore were willing to do what they could themselves. And this was very proper to be mentioned by the other evangelists, as it was a proof that the women had no expectation that Christ would rise again, any more than Joseph and Nicodemus; but St. John might omit it, as unnecessary to be repeated. See the note on ch. John 11:39.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 19:40". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-19.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

40.] See ch. John 11:44. Little is known with any certainty, except from these passages, of the Jews’ ordinary manner of burying. Winer, Friedlieb.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 19:40". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-19.html. 1863-1878.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

That is, persons of fashion.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 19:40". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-19.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

пеленамиблаговониями Вероятнее всего, благовония были положены по всей длине кусков полотна, которыми затем обернули Тело Иисуса. Еще благовония были положены под Тело и, возможно, уложены вокруг Него. Клейкая смола помогала ткани держаться.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on John 19:40". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/john-19.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

40.Then took they—In the last two verses John has mentioned Joseph and Nicodemus each in the singular, and then adds the part which each performed: the former secured the body, the latter furnished the embalmment for it. Now in the plural they both cooperate in the same work. Heretofore they may have been strangers; ever after doubtless they were brethren.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 19:40". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-19.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The burial custom of the Jews was to place the corpse on a long sheet with the feet at one end. They would then fold the cloth over the head and back down to the feet, which they would tie together. They would also tie the arms to the body with strips of cloth. Normally a separate cloth covered the face. [Note: See my note at11:44.] John"s interest was not in the manner of the burial as much as the honor that Joseph and Nicodemus bestowed on Jesus by burying Him in linen cloth (Gr. othonia). Their work had to be hasty because sunset was approaching quickly and all work had to cease when the Sabbath began at sunset on Friday.

The NIV translation of othonia as "strips of cloth" has seemingly contradicted the view that Joseph and Nicodemus buried Jesus in a single piece of cloth, which the Synoptics suggest ( Matthew 27:59; Mark 15:46; Luke 23:53). One writer believed the custom was to wrap the body in long, bandage-like strips rather than in a shroud. [Note: Morris, p730.] However this Greek word does not necessarily mean narrow strips of cloth. It can describe one or more large pieces of cloth. [Note: Brown, 2:942.] The burial customs of the Jews are still obscure enough that it is unwise to insist dogmatically that Jesus had only one shroud covering Him. The shroud of Turin is such a piece of cloth, though whether it was the real burial shroud of Jesus is the subject of considerable controversy.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 19:40". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-19.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 19:40. They took therefore the body of Jesus, and bound it in linen cloths with the spices, even as the manner of the Jews is to prepare for burial. It is hardly possible to suppose that the fact mentioned in the last clause is without a purpose. The words ‘even as’ would of themselves seem to Indicate as much as this. Let us remember then the importance which was attached by all to a splendid burial (comp. Luke 16:22); let us bear in mind that by ‘the Jews’ we are here to understand not the nation, but lather that portion of the nation which best exemplified its narrowness and bigotry, and which included its more respectable class; lastly, let us think of the worldly circumstances of Joseph, and in all probability of Nicodemus; and we shall feel that the Evangelist desires to call our attention to the striking fact, that, notwithstanding the ignominious death to which Jesus had been put, and though the rage of His enemies appeared to have so completely triumphed, there were yet those who prepared for Him as honoured and as costly a burial as could await any ‘Jew.’ That the word ‘burial’ is used to describe the wrapping of the body in the linen cloths may arise from the Evangelist’s desire to mention a circumstance which brings strongly into relief the condition in which these cloths were afterwards found (John 20:7). The body having thus been prepared for burial, the actual entombment alone remains to be spoken of.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 19:40". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-19.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 19:40. . They wrapped the body in strips of linen along with the aromatic preparations (2 Chronicles 16:14, ), as is the custom ( , 1 Maccabees 10:89) with the Jews (other peoples having other customs) to prepare for burial.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 19:40". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-19.html. 1897-1910.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

John 19:40. Then — To prepare for his interment; they took the body of Jesus — Without regarding the reproach to which it might expose them; and wound it in linen clothes — Wrapped it in a great many folds of linen; with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury — Or rather, to embalm, for the proper meaning of the verb ενταφιαζειν, here used, is not to bury, but to embalm, as Dr. Campbell proves in a note on the words; showing that the verb ενταφιαζειν, and the noun ενταφιασμος, are used in the New Testament only in relation to the embalming of the body of our Lord; the word used for to bury, being invariably θαπτειν, which accords perfectly with the use made of the same words by the LXX. See Genesis 50:2; Genesis 50:5, where the import of both words, and the distinction between them, is exemplified. It seems Joseph and Nicodemus intended to embalm our Lord’s body in a more exact manner as soon as the sabbath was over; hoping that, in the mean time, the spices lying near the body might preserve it from all taint of corruption. “Those who have written upon the manners and customs of the Jews tell us, that they sometimes embalmed their dead with an aromatic mixture of myrrh, aloes, and other gums or spices, which they rubbed on the body, more or less profusely, according to their circumstances and their regard for the dead. After anointing the body, they covered it with a shroud, or winding-sheet, then wrapped a napkin round its head and face, others say, round the forehead only; because the Egyptian mummies are observed to have it so; last of all, they swathed the shroud round the body as tightly as possible, with proper bandages made of linen. At other times, they covered the whole body in a heap of spices, as is said of Asa, 2 Chronicles 16:14. From the quantity of myrrh and aloes made use of by Joseph and Nicodemus, it would appear that the office performed by them to their Master was of this latter kind; for they had not time to embalm him properly.” They seem, however, to have done all that was usual in such circumstances to persons of wealth and distinction, which, as well as the sepulchre itself, agreed to Isaiah’s prophecy, Isaiah 53:9.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on John 19:40". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/john-19.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

wound. Greek. deo. Generally translated "bind". See John 11:44; John 18:12, John 18:24. The other evangelists use a different word.

linen clothes = linen cloths or bandages. The rolls" used for swathing the bodies of the rich (Isaiah 53:9). The Rabbis say criminals were wrapped in old rags.

bury = entomb. Greek. entaphiazo. Only here and Matthew 26:12. The noun entaphiasmos occurs in John 12:7 and Mark 14:8.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 19:40". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-19.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then took they the body of Jesus, and wound it in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury.

Then took they the body of Jesus, and wound it in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury - the mixed and pulverized myrrh and aloes shaken into the folds, and the entire body, thus swathed, wrapt in an outer covering of "clean linen cloth" (Matthew 27:59). Had the Lord's own friends had the least reason to think that the spark of life was still in Him, would they have done this? But even if one could conceive them mistaken, could anyone have lain thus enveloped for the period during which He was in the grave, and life still remained? Impossible. When, therefore, He walked forth from the tomb, we can say with the most absolute certainty, "Now is Christ risen forth the dead, and become the first-fruits of them that slept"! (1 Corinthians 15:20). No wonder that the learned and the barbarians alike were prepared to die for the name of the Lord Jesus; for such evidence was to the unprejudiced resistless. No mention is made of anointing in this operation. No doubt it was a hurried proceeding, for fear of interruption, and because it was close on the Sabbath. The women seem to have set the doing of this more perfectly as their proper task "as soon as the Sabbath should be past" (Mark 16:1). But as the Lord graciously held it as undesignedly anticipated by Mary at Bethany (Mark 14:8), so this was probably all the anointing, in the strict sense of it, which He received.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 19:40". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-19.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(40) And wound it in linen clothes with the spices.—Comp. Notes on Luke 24:12. The same word does not occur, but the manner of the Jews to bury has been also illustrated in the Note on John 11:44.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 19:40". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-19.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then took they the body of Jesus, and wound it in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury.
wound
11:44; 20:5-7; Acts 5:6
Reciprocal: Genesis 50:2 - embalmed;  2 Chronicles 16:14 - sweet odours;  Matthew 26:12 - GeneralMark 16:1 - sweet

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 19:40". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-19.html.

Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms

Ver. 40. "Then took they the body of Jesus, and wound it in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of the Jews is to bury."

The ὀθόνια, linen clothes, with which the whole body was enveloped, are to be distinguished from the κειρίαις in ch. John 11:44, these having been mere bands, which pertained only to the hands and feet, and which were there connected with the winding-sheet. Only in the case of our Lord are ὀθόνια mentioned: comp. Luke 24:12; John 20:6-7.

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Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on John 19:40". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/john-19.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

40.As the custom of the Jews is to bury. When Christ had endured extreme ignominy on the cross, God determined that his burial should be honourable, that it might serve as a preparation for the glory of his resurrection. The money expended on it by Nicodemus and Joseph is very great, and may be thought by some to be superfluous; but we ought to consider the design of God, who even led them, by his Spirit, to render this honor to his own Son, that, by the sweet savor of his grave he might take away our dread of the cross. But those things which are cut of the ordinary course ought not to be regarded as an example.

Besides, the Evangelist expressly states that he was buried according to the custom of the Jews. By these words he informs us that this was one of the ceremonies of the Law; for the ancient people, who did not receive so clear a statement of the resurrection, and who had not such a demonstration and pledge of it as we have in Christ, needed such aids to support them, that they might firmly believe and expect the coming of the Mediator (190) We ought, therefore, to attend to the distinction between us, who have been enlightened by the brightness of the Gospel, and the rather, to whom the figures supplied the absence of Christ. This is the reason why allowance could then be made for a greater pomp of ceremonies, which, at the present day, would not be free from blame; for those who now bury the dead at so great an expense do not, strictly speaking, bury dead men, but rather, as far as lies in their power, draw down from heaven Christ himself, the King of life, and lay him in the tomb, for his glorious resurrection (191) abolished those ancient ceremonies.

Among the heathen, too, there was great anxiety and ceremony in burying the dead, which unquestionably derived its origin from the ancient Fathers of the Jews, (192) in the same manner as sacrifices; but, as no hope of the resurrection existed along them, they were not imitators of the Fathers, but apes of them; for the promise and word of God is, as it were, the soul, which gives life to ceremonies. Take away the word, and all the ceremonies which men observe, though outwardly they may resemble the worship of godly persons, is nothing else than foolish or mad superstition. For our part, as we have said, we ought now to maintain sobriety and moderation in this matter, for immoderate expense quenches the sweet savour of Christ’s resurrection.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 19:40". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-19.html. 1840-57.