Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 20:26

After eight days His disciples were again inside, and Thomas with them. Jesus *came, the doors having been shut, and stood in their midst and said, "Peace be with you."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Jesus, the Christ;   Skepticism;   Thomas;   Thompson Chain Reference - Appears, Christ;   Christ;   Dead, the;   Mortality-Immortality;   Resurrection;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Resurrection of Christ, the;   Sabbath, the;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Miracle;   Salutation;   Thomas;   Weeks;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jesus christ;   Mark;   Resurrection;   Thomas;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Lord's Day, the;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ;   Sabbath;   Thomas;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - John the Apostle;   John, the Gospel According to;   Lord's Day;   Mary Magdalene;   Thomas;   Holman Bible Dictionary - John, the Gospel of;   Resurrection;   Resurrection of Jesus Christ;   Worship;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - John, Gospel of;   Thomas;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Body (2);   Calendar, the Christian;   Consolation;   Lord's Day;   Peace;   Peace (2);   Resurrection of Christ;   Sabbath ;   Slowness of Heart;   Thomas;   Unbelief (2);   Upper Room (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Thomas ;   1910 New Catholic Dictionary - closed doors;   doors, closed;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Sabbath;   Salute;   Thomas;   Smith Bible Dictionary - John the Apostle;   John, Gospel of;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Eight;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Thomas;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Body, Spiritual;   Christ, the Exaltation of;   Greeting;   Nathanael (2);   Peace;   Sabbath;   Thomas;   Worship;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for June 1;   Every Day Light - Devotion for December 8;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

After eight days - It seems likely that this was precisely on that day se'nnight, on which Christ had appeared to them before; and from this we may learn that this was the weekly meeting of the apostles; and, though Thomas was not found at the former meeting, he was determined not to be absent from this. According to his custom, Jesus came again; for he cannot forget his promise - two or three are assembled in his name; and he has engaged to be among them.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 20:26". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-20.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And after eight days again - That is, on the return of the first day of the week. From this it appears that they thus early set apart this day for assembling together, and Jesus countenanced it by appearing twice with them. It was natural that the apostles should observe this day, but not probable that they would do it without the sanction of the Lord Jesus. His repeated presence gave such a sanction, and the historical fact is indisputable that from this time this day was observed as the Christian Sabbath. See Acts 20:7; 1 Corinthians 16:2; Revelation 1:10.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/john-20.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 20:26

Then after eight days again His disciples were within

The Christian Sabbath

Jesus rose the first day of the week, and appeared to His disciples.
Then He appeared not again till the eighth day after, nor do we read of the disciples meeting meanwhile. The day is thus mentioned for some special end, which could be no other but to show the translation of the Sabbath from the seventh day to the first. Hence, therefore

1. It appears that Christ preferred the first day before the seventh.

2. The disciples had their public and solemn meetings on that day (Acts 1 Corinthians 16:2).

3. It is called the Lord’s day (Revelation 1:10), as the Eucharist is called the Lord’s supper (1 Corinthians 11:20). John supposing thereby the day to be well known. So Ignatius and Tertullion. Justin Martyr calls it Sunday. So then the Jewish Sabbath was buried with Christ, and the Christian rose with Him.

I. WHY WAS THE DAY THUS CHANGED?

1. The Jewish Sabbath, as kept on the seventh day, was but a ceremony peculiar to the Jews; a sign that God was their God, and they His people Exodus 31:13-14; Exo_31:17; Ezekiel 20:12; Eze_20:30). But now they have ceased to be God’s peculiar people, and therefore the sign must needs cease.

2. The Jewish Sabbath was kept in commemoration not only of creation but of redemption from Egypt (Exodus 20:8; Deuteronomy 5:13-15). But this redemption was but a type of Christ’s, and must needs give place to it. Hence the Sabbath was among the shadows of those things to Colossians 2:16-17).

3. The Jewish Sabbath began but in Moses; for we read not of their keeping it till it rained manna (Exodus 16:1-36); and if we reckon back from this we find that Pharaoh was destroyed on the Sabbath. But on our Sabbath our spiritual Pharaoh was destroyed; for Jesus rose from the dead. Moreover, all the Mosaical law ended in Christ, and therefore this: and the Jews still adhering to it were destroyed on it; for it was their Sabbath when Jerusalem was taken.

II. WHETHER WE ARE BOUND TO OBSERVE THE LORD’S DAY AS THE JEWS THEIR SABBATH?

1. Though the appointment of one day in seven for the religious rest be of positive institution, yet the rest or duty to be observed on that day is certainly moral and perpetual. Now

(a) It is a Sabbath or rest of the Lord.

(b) On that day He rested from the work of creation.

(c) He blessed and sanctified it.

2. The reason of observing one day in seven is the same to Christians as to Jews and patriarchs, i.e., on account of the Creation, which we are obliged to bless and serve God for, as they; and as to the designation of the Lord’s day in particular, that certainly is much more binding on Christians, as our deliverance was greater, and of infinitely more consequence.

III. HOW MUST THIS DAY BE SPENT? It must be sanctified, i.e., set apart unto the Lord.

1. You must lay aside all worldly employment (Exodus 20:8; Leviticus 23:2; Amos 8:5; Nehemiah 13:19).

2. And all carnal pleasures, which impede God’s service (Isaiah 58:13).

3. And set apart the day

(a) Set your worldly business in order over night.

(b) So soon as you are awake remember it is the Sabbath.

(c) Endeavour by prayer and meditation to get above the world.

(d) Absent not yourself from the public worship of God.

(e) Fill up the intervals as much as possible with prayer, reading, meditation, conferring.

Conclusion: Consider

1. God has given you six days, and set apart this for Himself; do not rob Him of it (Ezekiel 23:38).

2. Consider the judgments upon profaneness of it (Numbers 15:33-34).

3. There is a blessing promised to them that sanctify it (Isaiah 56:2; Isa_56:6-7).

4. This is the way to live as if in heaven upon earth.

5. This is the way to spend an eternal Sabbath in heaven when we are parted from the earth. (Bp. Beveridge)
.

Peace be unto you.

Peace from the risen Christ

I. THE BLESSING PRONOUNCED. Peace; that which is needed by

1. The mind perplexed with doubt.

2. The conscience oppressed with guilt.

3. The heart agitated with sorrow.

II. WHO PRONOUNCED IT? He

1. Who had Himself felt the need of it.

2. Whose death purchased it.

3. Whose life secures it.

III. WHEN?

1. When the resurrection had ratified it.

2. When the disciples were seeking it. (Newman Hall, LL. B.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 20:26". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-20.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them. Jesus cometh, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace be unto you.

To this point all was exactly the same as before: the disciples within, the doors shut, but with this difference: Thomas was present. Perhaps they were wondering if the Lord would return; and sure enough he did. Again, he appeared through closed doors that had not opened. His magnificent "Peace be unto you" rang out just as before. And then came the climax of that second appearance to the eleven.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-20.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And after eight days,.... That is, after another week, the same day a week later, which taking in the day in which Christ rose and appeared to Mary Magdalene, and his disciples, and the day in which he now appeared to the disciples with Thomas, made eight days; a like way of speaking see in Luke 9:28 compared with Matthew 17:1. And Dr. Hammond has proved from JosephusF23Antiqu. l. 7. c. 9. , that the Jews used to express a week by eight days.

Again, his disciples were within; within doors, in some private house; probably the same as before, in some part of the city of Jerusalem:

and Thomas with them: which shows their harmony and agreement, their frequency and constancy in meeting together, and their Christian forbearance with Thomas, notwithstanding his unbelief; whom they looked upon as a good man, and retained in their company, hoping by one means or other he would be convinced: and it also shows Thomas's regard to them, and affection for them, by meeting with them, though he had not the same faith in the resurrection of Christ:

then came Jesus; when the disciples, with Thomas, were together; so making good his promise to meet with his people when they meet; and thereby putting an honour upon, and giving encouragement to with the saints: if it should be asked, why did not Christ come sooner? it may be replied, that the reason, on his part, was, it was his will and pleasure to come at this time, and not before; Christ has his set times to himself, when he will appear and manifest himself to his people: on Thomas's part the reasons might be, partly to rebuke him for his sin, and that the strength of his unbelief might appear the more, and that some desire might be stirred up in him to see Christ, if he was risen. And on the part of the disciples, because they did not meet together sooner; and for the further trial of their faith, whether it would continue or not, Thomas obstinately persisting in his unbelief:

the doors being shut; as before, and for the same reason, for fear of the Jews, as well as for the privacy of their devotion and conversation:

and stood in the midst; having in the same powerful manner as before caused the doors, locks, and bars to give way, when at once he appeared in the midst of them all, not to Thomas alone, but to all the eleven; and this the rather, because the disciples had bore a testimony to Christ's resurrection, and which he meant now to confirm; and to rebuke Thomas publicly, who had sinned before them all:

and said, peace be unto you; which he had said before, and now, saluting Thomas in like manner as he did the rest, notwithstanding his unbelief.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 20:26". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-20.html. 1999.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

26. And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them: then came Jesus, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace be unto you.

[The doors being shut.] I would not easily believe that the intention of the evangelist in this place was to let us know that Christ penetrated the doors with his body; but rather that the doors were shut for fear of the Jews, as verse 19; which he also reiterates in this verse, that he might let us know the disciples were still at Jerusalem, where their greatest danger lay. On the morrow, probably, they were to make towards Galilee.

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on John 20:26". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/john-20.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

After eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them. It was on the second Sunday after the resurrection; the second Lord's day in the history of the world.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 20:26". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-20.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

After eight days (μετ ημερας οκτωmeth' hēmeras oktō). That is the next Sunday evening, on the eighth day in reality just like “after three days” and “on the third day.”

Within (εσωesō). Apparently in the same room as before.

Cometh
(ερχεταιerchetai). Vivid dramatic present. The other items precisely as in John 20:19 save Thomas was with them.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-20.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Then came Jesus

There is no connecting particle, then, and the verb is in the present tense. The abrupt Jesus cometh is more graphic.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-20.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them: then came Jesus, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace be unto you.

After eight days — On the next Sunday.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on John 20:26". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/john-20.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them. Jesus cometh, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace [be] unto you1.
    SIXTH APPEARANCE OF JESUS. (Sunday, one week after the resurrection.) John 20:26-31; 1 Corinthians 15:5

  1. Jesus cometh, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace [be] unto you. He came in the same manner and with the same salutation as formerly (see John 20:19), giving Thomas a like opportunity for believing

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 20:26". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-20.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Подай перст. О форме появления Христа и форме Его приветствия мы уже говорили. Далее из того, что Христос столь легко согласился исполнить неуместную просьбу Фомы, пригласив его потрогать руки и исследовать рану на боку, мы выводим: Он заботился не только о его, но и о нашей вере. Не только для Фомы, но и для нас было важно, чтобы все подтверждало истинность нашей веры. Удивительно и знаменательно оцепенение Фомы. Не довольствовавшись одним Христовым присутствием, он захотел удостовериться в воскресении собственными руками. Так по отношению ко Христу он явил не только упорство, но и гордыню. По крайней мере теперь, видя Христа, он должен был смутиться и устыдиться. Однако Фома, словно не сознавая за собой вины, дерзко вкладывает руку в Его ребра. Из слов Евангелиста можно заключить, что Фома образумился не прежде, чем его убедило само прикосновение. Так и мы, когда воздаем Слову Божию меньше предлежащей ему чести, неосознанно впадаем в еще худшее ожесточение, несущее с собой презрение к Слову и устраняющее все наше почтение к нему. Тем более надо стремиться к тому, чтобы сдерживать распущенность нашего разума, дабы кто-то, потакая себе в этом противлении, не угасил полностью чувство благочестия и не закрыл для себя дверь веры.

 

 

 

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-20.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

26 And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them: then came Jesus, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace be unto you.

Ver. 26. The doors being shut] Although it be said, that when Christ came to his disciples the doors were shut, yet have I as much to prove that the doors opened at his coming, as ye to prove that he came through the door, said Robert Smith, martyr, to the doctor that disputed with him.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 20:26". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-20.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, 1. Our Saviour's appearing again to his disciples after his resurrection; it was eight days after he first arose, which was the first day of the week.

Here note, that Christ's rising the first day of the week, and appearing on the next first day of the week after to the disciples, and the observing that day for their solemn assemblies, and St. Paul administering on that day the Lord's supper, Acts 20:7-11 and commanding on that day collections for the poor, 1 Corinthians 16:2 and St. John calling it the Lord's day Revelation 1:10. From these authorities, and the primitive practice, we derive our Christian sabbath; for we do not find in all the scripture, one instance of any one congregation of Christians only assembling upon the Jewish sabbath, but on the first day of the week; on which we ground our observation of that day.

Observe, 2. The wonderful condescension of Christ to the weakness of Thomas's faith: he bids him reach forth his hand, and thrust it into his side. Not that Christ was pleased with, but only pitiful towards, Thomas's infirmities; and it ought to be no encouragement to any person to follow his example, in seeking or expecting the like signs of their own prescribing for helping of their faith.

Observe, 3. How mercifully Christ overruled Thomas's unbelief, for the confirmation of our faith. His doubting, proved a means for establishing his own and our faith; Therefore says Gregory will, Plus mihi profuit dubitatio Thomas Quam credulitas Mariae; "Had not Thomas doubted, we had not been so fully assured, that it was the same Christ that was crucified who rose again."

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on John 20:26". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/john-20.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

26.] There is not the least reason for supposing, with Olshausen, that this appearance was in Galilee. The whole narrative points out the same place as before.

The eight days’ interval is the first testimony of the recurring day of the Resurrection being commemorated by the disciples:—but, it must be owned, a weak one;—for in all probability they had been thus assembled every day during the interval. It forms however an interesting opening of the history of THE LORD’S DAY, that the Lord Himself should have thus selected and honoured it.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 20:26". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-20.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 20:26. ΄ετὰ ἡμέρας ὀκτὼ, after eight days) the first day of the week again (Sunday). There had been therefore no appearance vouchsafed during the intervening days. [But for how many periods of eight days, not to say periods of eight years, hast thou cherished unbelief?—V. g.]— τῶν θυρῶν κεκλεισμένων, the doors having been shut) Not yet had they altogether ceased to fear.— ἐιρήνη, peace) a third time: John 20:19; John 20:21.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 20:26". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-20.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

After eight days signifieth here the eighth day from the resurrection, counting the day wherein Christ rose for one; as we call those third day agues which have but one day’s intermission, and those quartan agues which have but two days’ intermission; so it is said, Mark 8:31, after three days he shall rise again, that is, the third day. This appears the most probable sense of the phrase: the disciples beginning from Christ’s resurrection to keep the first day of the week for the weekly sabbath, and having met on the resurrection day, met again that day seven night, hoping (probably) for such a presence of Christ with them in their meeting as they had before experienced; nor was their expectation vain. It appears also there, from Acts 20:7, and 1 Corinthians 16:2, that the Christians were wont ordinarily to meet together the first day of the week for religious exercises; which from Christ’s resurrection, or institution, or both, is thought to be called the Lord’s day, Revelation 1:10. Nor indeed do we read in all the Scripture of any congregation of Christians on the Jewish sabbath, but upon this day; though, indeed, we find that the apostles (and possibly some other Christians) did meet together with the Jews in their synagogues on their sabbath; but we have not so much as one instance after the resurrection of any congregation, where Christians only were assembled upon the Jewish sabbath. Thomas at this time was with them. It is said again that Christ came and stood in the midst of them,

the doors being shut: concerning which phrase, See Poole on "John 20:19".

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 20:26". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-20.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

After eight days; on the next Lord’s day.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-20.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

26.After eight days—The Sunday after the Sunday of the resurrection; the second Christian sabbath or Lord’s day. It has not ceased to be commemorated from that time to this as a holy day in the tradition of the Christian Church. The fourth commandment requires that one day in seven should be sabbath; the Jewish Church, under divine guidance, fixed that seventh upon Saturday; the Christian Church upon Sunday.

Jesus’ doors being shut’ stood—This language, without a great violence, must be so interpreted as to express a sudden miraculous standing of our Lord before them in an apartment completely shut.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-20.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

John located this post-resurrection appearance eight days after Easter Sunday, namely, the following Sunday. His "eight days" (Gr. hemeras okto) evidently included both Sundays. Perhaps he identified the day because, by the time John wrote, Sunday had become the day of worship for Christians, when they commemorated Jesus" resurrection. They worshipped Him on Easter Sunday, then again the following Sunday, and then on succeeding Sundays from then on (cf. Acts 20:7). However Sunday worship has its roots in tradition rather than commandment.

The disciples were still meeting behind closed doors because they feared the Jewish authorities (cf. John 20:19). Jesus again materialized in the presence of these disciples as He had a week earlier ( John 20:19). He also repeated His benediction ( John 20:21). Perhaps Jesus did these things because the disciples had told Thomas that He had appeared this way and had said these things. This would have bolstered Thomas" faith.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-20.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 20:26. And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them. The place of assembly was without doubt the same as before; and that the apostles were assembled on the Sunday appears to indicate that they already regarded the host day of the week as a day which the Risen Lord would peculiarly bless.

Jesus cometh when the doors had been shat, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace he unto you. All is the same as at John 20:19.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-20.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 20:26. . . Probably he had been with them every day during the interval, but as Bengel remarks, “interjectis diebus nulla fuerat apparitio”. On the first day of the second week the disciples were “again,” as on the previous Sunday, “within” in the same convenient place of meeting, and now Thomas is with them. As on the previous occasion (John 20:19), the doors were shut and Jesus suddenly appeared among them and greeted them with the customary salutation.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 20:26". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-20.html. 1897-1910.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

John 20:26. After eight days — That is, eight days after his resurrection, namely, the next Sunday; again his disciples were within — Were in a private room, as they were before; and Thomas with them — For though he had been absent once, yet he would not be absent a second time. When we have lost one opportunity of receiving good, we should give the more earnest heed to lay hold on the next. Then came Jesus, the doors being shut, as before, and stood in the midst — And they all knew him; for he showed himself now just as he had shown himself before. Our Lord deferred this his second appearance for some time, 1st, To show his disciples that he was not risen to such a life as he had formerly lived, to converse daily and hourly with them, but was as one that belonged to another world, and visited this only as angels do, now and then, when there was occasion. Where Christ was during these eight days, and the rest of the time of his abode on earth, would be folly to inquire, and presumption to determine. Wherever he was, no doubt angels ministered unto him. 2d. He deferred it so long as seven days for three reasons: 1st, That he might put a rebuke on Thomas for his incredulity, and perhaps also for his negligence. He had not attended the former meeting of the disciples, and to teach him to prize those seasons of grace better for the future, he shall not have such another opportunity for several days. A very melancholy week we have reason to think he had of it; drooping and in suspense, while the other disciples were full of joy: and the cause was in himself: it was his own folly and unbelief. 2d, That he might try the faith and patience of the rest of the disciples. They had gained a great point when they were satisfied that they had seen the Lord; then were the disciples glad; but he would try whether they could keep the ground they had gained when they saw no more of him for seven days. And thus he would gradually wean them from his bodily presence, which they had doted and depended too much upon. 3d, That he might put an honour upon the first day of the week, and give a plain intimation of his will, that it should be observed in his church as the Christian sabbath, that is, the weekly day of holy rest and holy convocations. That one day in seven should be religiously observed, was an appointment from the beginning; as old as innocence; and that, in the kingdom of the Messiah, the first day in the week should be that solemn day, Christ’s meeting his disciples in a religious assembly once and again on that day was indication sufficient. Add to this, it is highly probable, that in his former appearance to them he had ordered them to come together again that day seven-night, and had promised to meet them, and also that he appeared to them every first day of the week, (besides at some other times,) during forty days. And the religious observance of that day has been from thence transmitted down to us through every age of the church. This therefore is the day which the Lord has made sacred, and appointed for his peculiar worship and service. On this occasion also Christ said, Peace be unto you — Thus saluting them all in a friendly and affectionate manner, as he had done before. And this was no vain repetition, but significant of the abundant and assured peace which he gives, and of the continuance of his blessings upon his people, for they fail not, but are new every morning, new every meeting.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on John 20:26". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/john-20.html. 1857.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

after eight days: i.e. a week later, on the day following the second Sabbath of the seven in the reckoning to Pentecost.

after. Greek meta. App-104.

the doors being shut. This shows that the Lord had now the spiritual body, soma pneumatikon, of 1 Corinthians 15:44.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 20:26". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-20.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them: then came Jesus, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace be unto you.

And after eight days - that is, on the eighth or first day of the following week. They themselves probably met every day during the preceding week, but their Lord designedly reserved His second appearance among them until the recurrence of His resurrection-day, that He might thus inaugurate the delightful sanctities of THE LORD'S DAY (Revelation 1:10).

His disciples were within, and Thomas with them. Then came Jesus, [ erchetai (Greek #2064) ho (Greek #3588) Ieesous (Greek #2424)] - rather, 'Jesus cometh,'

The doors being shut (see the note at John 20:19),

And stood in the midst - not 'sat;' for the manifestation was to be, as on the evening of the week preceding, merely to show Himself among them as their risen Lord.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-20.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

26. And Thomas was with them. This was the second Lord’s day! [Christians quickly began calling Sunday the Lord’s day, because he rose from death on that day of the week.]

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 20:26". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-20.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(26) And after eight days again his disciples were within.—That is, on the octave of the first appearance to them; as we should now say, on the first Sunday after Easter. There is no reason for thinking that they had not met together during the interval, and that their meeting was a special observance of the Lord’s Day. At the same time this appearance on the recurrence of the first day of the week would take its place among the steps by which the disciples passed from the observance of the Jewish Sabbath to that of the Christian Sunday.

The place is obviously the same as that of the first appearance, and the doors are shut for the same reason. (Comp. Note on John 20:19.)

The repetition of the greeting, “Peace be unto you,” is partly the natural salutation as He appears to them, but now indeed full of a new meaning, which the thoughts of the week must have written upon their hearts, and partly, it may be, is specially intended to include Thomas, who was not present when it was spoken before.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-20.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And after eight days again his disciples were within, and Thomas with them: then came Jesus, the doors being shut, and stood in the midst, and said, Peace be unto you.
eight
19; Matthew 17:1; Luke 9:28
Thomas
Peace
19; Isaiah 26:12; 27:5; 54:10
Reciprocal: Genesis 43:23 - Peace;  Numbers 6:26 - give thee;  Judges 6:23 - Peace be;  Psalm 85:8 - for he;  Matthew 18:20 - two;  Luke 24:36 - Peace;  John 14:27 - Peace I leave;  John 21:14 - the third time;  Acts 1:13 - Thomas;  Acts 2:32 - whereof;  Acts 12:10 - which;  Acts 20:7 - the first;  Romans 10:9 - and shalt;  1 Corinthians 15:44 - there is a spiritual;  1 Corinthians 16:2 - the first;  1 Peter 5:14 - Peace;  Revelation 1:10 - on the

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 20:26". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-20.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

26.Reach hither thy finger. We have already spoken once about Christ’s entrance, and the form of salutation which he employed. When Christ so readily yields to the improper request of Thomas, (218) and, of his own accord, invites him to feel his hands, and touch the wound of his side, we learn from this how earnestly desirous he was to promote our faith and that of Thomas; for it was not to Thomas only, but to us also, that he looked, that nothing might be wanting which was necessary for confirming our faith.

The stupidity of Thomas was astonishing and monstrous; for he was not satisfied with merely beholding Christ out wished to have his hands also as witnesses of Christ’s resurrection. Thus he was not only obstinate, but also proud and contemptuous in his treatment of Christ. Now, at least, when he saw Christ, he ought to have been overwhelmed with shame and amazement; but, on the contrary, he boldly and fearlessly stretches forth his hand, as if he were not conscious of any guilt; for it may be readily inferred from the words of the Evangelist, that he did not repent before that he had convinced himself by touching. Thus it happens that, when we render to the word of God less honor than is due to it, there steals upon us, without our knowledge, a glowing obstinacy, which brings along with it a contempt of the word of God, and makes us lose all reverence for it. So much the more earnestly should we labor to restrain the wantonness of our mind, that none of us, by improperly indulging in contradiction, and extinguishing, as it were, the feeling of piety, may block up against ourselves the gate of faith.

My Lord and my God! Thomas awakes at length, though late, and as persons who have been mentally deranged commonly do when they come to themselves, exclaims, in astonishment, My Lord and my God! For the abruptness of the language has great vehemence; nor can it be doubted that shame compelled him to break out into this expression, in order to condemn his own stupidity. Besides, so sudden an exclamation shows that faith was not wholly extinguished in him, though it had been choked; for in the side or hands of Christ he does not handle Christ’s Divinity, but from those signs he infers much more than they exhibited. Whence comes this, but because, after forgetfulness and deep sleep, he suddenly comes to himself? This shows, therefore, the truth of what I said a little ago, that the faith which appeared to be destroyed was, as it were, concealed and buried in his heart.

The same thing happens sometimes with many persons; for they grow wanton for a time, as if they had cast off all fear of God, so that there appears to be no longer any faith in them; but as soon as God has chastised them with a rod, the rebellion of their flesh is subdued, and they return to their right senses. It is certain that disease would not, of itself, be sufficient to teach piety; and hence we infer, that, when the obstructions have been removed, the good seed, which had been concealed and crushed, springs up. We have a striking instance of this in David; for, so long as he is permitted to gratify his lust, we see how he indulges without restraint. Every person would have thought that, at that time, faith had been altogether banished from his mind; and yet, by a short exhortation of the Prophet, he is so suddenly recalled to life, that it may easily be inferred, that some spark, though it had been choked, still remained in his mind, and speedily burst into a flame. So far as relates to the men themselves, they are as guilty as if’ they had renounced faith and all the grace of the Holy Spirit; but the infinite goodness of God prevents the elect from falling so low as to be entirely alienated from God. We ought, therefore, to be most zealously on our guard not to fall from faith; and yet we ought to believe that God restrains his elect by secret bridle, that they may not fall to their destruction, and that He always cherishes miraculously in their hearts some sparks of faith, which he afterwards, at the proper time, kindles anew by the breath of his Spirit.

There are two clauses in this confession. Thomas acknowledges that Christ is his Lord, and then, in the second clauses, (219) he ascends higher, and calls him also his God. We know in what sense Scripture gives to Christ the name of Lord. It is, because the rather hath appointed him to be the highest governor, that he may hold all things under his dominion., that every knee may bow before him, (Philippians 2:10,) and., in short, that he may be the Father’s vicegerent in governing the world. Thus the name Lord properly belongs to him, so far as he is the Mediator manifested in the flesh, and the Head of the Church. But Thomas, having acknowledged him to be Lord, is immediately carried upwards to his eternal Divinity, and justly; for the reason why Christ descended to us, and first was humbled, and afterwards was placed at the Father’s right hand, and obtained dominion over heaven and earth, was, that he might exalt us to his own Divine glory, and to the glory of the Father. That our faith may arrive at the eternal Divinity of Christ., we must begin with that knowledge which is nearer and more easily acquired. Thus it has been justly said by some, that by Christ Man we are conducted to Christ God, because our faith makes such gradual progress that, perceiving Christ on earth, born in a stable, and hanging on a cross., it rises to the glory of his resurrection, and, proceeding onwards, comes at length to his eternal life and power, in which his Divine Majesty is gloriously displayed.

Yet we ought to believe, that we cannot know Christ as our Lord, in a proper manner, without immediately obtaining also a knowledge of his Divinity. Nor is there any room to doubt that this ought to be a confession common to all believers., when we perceive that it is approved by Christ. He certainly would never have endured that the Father should be robbed of the honour due to him, and that this honor should be falsely and groundlessly conveyed to himself. But he plainly ratifies what Thomas said; and, therefore, this passage is abundantly sufficient for refuting the madness of Arius; for it is not lawful to imagine two Gods. Here also is declared the unity of person in Christ; for the same Jesus Christ (220) is called both God and Lord. Emphatically, to, he twice calls him his own, MYLord and MY God! declaring, that he speaks in earnest, and with a lively sentiment of faith.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on John 20:26". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-20.html. 1840-57.