Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

John 20:27

Then He *said to Thomas, "Reach here with your finger, and see My hands; and reach here your hand and put it into My side; and do not be unbelieving, but believing."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Backsliders;   Faith;   Jesus, the Christ;   Skepticism;   Spear;   Thomas;   Unbelief;   Thompson Chain Reference - Christ;   Condescension, Divine;   Dead, the;   Demonstration, Divine;   Distrust;   Divine;   Doubt Rebuked;   Faith;   Faith-Unbelief;   Faithlessness;   God;   Infidelity;   Mortality-Immortality;   Resurrection;   Thomas;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Human Nature of Christ, the;   Resurrection of Christ, the;   Unbelief;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jesus christ;   Resurrection;   Thomas;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Doubt;   Touch;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Resurrection of Christ;   Thomas;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - John, the Epistles of;   John, the Gospel According to;   Mary Magdalene;   Thomas;   Holman Bible Dictionary - John, the Gospel of;   Resurrection;   Resurrection of Jesus Christ;   Typology;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - John, Gospel of;   Resurrection;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Appreciation (of Christ);   Ascension;   Attributes of Christ;   Body (2);   Considerateness;   Crucifixion;   Faith ;   Feet (2);   Nathanael ;   Patience ;   Slowness of Heart;   Thomas;   Touch;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Thomas ;   Unbeliever,;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Thomas;   Smith Bible Dictionary - John, Gospel of;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Thomas;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Andrew;   Body, Spiritual;   Christ, the Exaltation of;   Faithless;   Gnosticism;   Johannine Theology, the;  
Devotionals:
Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for March 13;   Every Day Light - Devotion for December 8;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Then saith he to Thomas - Through his infinite compassion, he addressed him in a particular manner; condescending in this case to accommodate himself to the prejudices of an obstinate, though sincere, disciple.

Reach hither thy finger, etc. - And it is very probable that Thomas did so; for his unbelief was too deeply rooted to be easily cured.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on John 20:27". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/john-20.html. 1832.

The Biblical Illustrator

John 20:27

Then said He to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger.

Signs and evidences

1. How struck must Thomas have been when his Lord addressed to him the very words which he had himself used (John 20:25)! Jesus knows how to send the word home to us.

2. In the church of to-day we have many a Thomas,--slow, suspicious, critical, full of doubts, yet true-hearted.

3. Thomas set his Lord a test, and thus tried His patience.

4. The Lord accepted the test, and so proved His condescension.

5. The proof sufficed for Thomas, and thus showed the Lord’s wisdom.

6. Peradventure, certain among us would desire tests of some such sort. To those we would earnestly say

I. CRAVE NO SIGNS. After the full proofs Which Christ gave to His apostles, we need no more, and to look for further signs and evidences would be wrong. Yet some are demanding miracles, faith-healings, visions, voices, impressions, transports, depressions, &c.

1. It is dishonouring to your Lord.

2. It is unreasonable, when the truth bears its own evidence.

3. It is presumptuous. How dare we stipulate for proof more than sufficient, or demand evidence of a sort which pleases our prejudices!

4. It is damaging to ourselves. Faith must be weak while we demand for it such proofs; and in this weakness lies incalculable mischief.

5. It is dangerous. We may readily be driven either into infidelity or superstition, if we give way to this craving for signs. Picture what Thomas could and would have become under the influence of his unbelief, had not his Lord interposed.

II. YET TURN TO CHRIST’S WOUNDS. Let these stand to you instead of signs and wonders. Behold in these wounds

1. The seals of His death. He did actually and truly die. How could He outlive that wound in His side?

2. The identification of His person as actually risen.

3. The tokens of His love. He has graven us upon the palms of His hands.

4. The ensigns of His conflict, of which He is not ashamed, for He displays them.

5. The memorials of His passion, by which He is manifested in glory as the Lamb that was slain (Revelation 5:6). This should more than suffice you; but should doubt still linger

III. USE SUCH EVIDENCES AS YOU POSSESS.

1. The sacred narrative of our Lord’s life and death, if carefully studied, exhibits a singular self-evidencing power.

2. The regenerating and purifying result of faith in the great Lord is a further piece of evidence. “By their fruits ye shall know them” Matthew 7:20).

3. The solace which faith yields in sorrow is good proof.

4. The strength it gives in the hour of temptation is further help.

5. The ardour of mind and elevation of aim, which faith in Jesus creates, are other experimental arguments.

6. The visitations of the Holy Spirit, in quickening the heart, reviving the spirit, and guiding the mind, are additional proofs. Thus the Holy Ghost bears witness to our Lord.

7. The actual enjoyment of fellowship with the Lord Jesus Himself is the master-key of the whole controversy. “We have known and believed” 1 John 4:17). Conclusion:

1. Does this seem an idle tale to you?

2. Should you not see cause for fear, if it be so?

3. Seek now to view those wounds believingly, that you may live. (C. H.Spurgeon.)

Christ known by the nail prints:

In an old legend it is said that Satan once appeared to an old saint and said, “I am Christ,” when the saint confounded him, and exposed his pretensions, as he said, “Then where are the nail-prints?” (H. O. Mackey.)

Be not faithless but believing:

A gentleman who assisted the Countess of Huntingdon in the management of Spa-fields Chapel, called upon her one day, to expostulate with her on the impropriety of entering into engagements without having the means of honourably fulfilling them. Before he left the house her letters arrived. As she opened one her countenance brightened, and her tears began to flow; the letter was to this effect, “An individual, who has heard of Lady Huntingdon’s exertions to spread the gospel, requests her acceptance of the enclosed draft to assist her in the laudable undertaking.” The draft was for five hundred pounds--the exact sum for which she stood engaged. “Here,” said she, “take it, and pay for the chapel, and be no longer faithless, but believing.”

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "John 20:27". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/john-20.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and see my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and put it into my side; and be not faithless, but believing.

The overpowering drama of this is worthy of the Son of God himself and his blessed apostles; and one cannot but reflect upon the poverty of the church of all ages which would have been sustained had not John the apostle provided this record of what happened.

Reach hither thy finger ... thy hand ... Neither Christ nor his religion has anything to hide, nothing to conceal or cover up, no issues to avoid or problems to evade. To every unbeliever of all ages, the challenge of the risen Christ still thunders across centuries and millennia: INVESTIGATE! Test the evidence; make your own examination of the facts; and be not faithless but believing. Thus, infidelity was rooted out of the sacred group, and thus it has been rooted out of the heart of every unbeliever throughout history who took the trouble to investigate. This gives the lie to the satanic falsehood that knowledge leads to unbelief. It is the opposite. Ignorance leads to unbelief, as do prejudice, sin, and rebellion in the heart.

Thomas is often called "the doubter," but this is only another example of dignifying sin with some other title than its true one. The Lord did not refer to Thomas as a doubter, but as an unbeliever.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on John 20:27". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/john-20.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then saith he to Thomas,.... For whose sake he chiefly came, and whom he at once singled out from the rest, and called by name in the most friendly manner, without upbraiding or reproaching him for not believing the testimony that had been given him:

reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands, and reach hither thine hand and thrust it into my side; that is, make use of every way by seeing, feeling, and examining the scars in my hands, and the hole in my side, and satisfy thyself in the manner thou hast desired; which shows the omniscience of Christ, who knew what had passed between him and the other disciples, and the very words Thomas had expressed himself in; also his great humility and condescension in submitting himself to be examined in the very manner he had fixed; and likewise the reality of his resurrection:

and be not faithless, but believing; in which words Christ dissuades him from unbelief, which is very evil in its own nature, and in its effects; it is the root of all evil; it unfits for duty, and renders the word unprofitable, and leads men off from Christ; and is the more aggravated in the people of God, by the instances, declarations, and promises of grace, and discoveries of love made unto them: and he also encourages him to believe. The exercise of the grace of faith is well pleasing to Christ; it gives glory to him, and makes for the soul's comfort; and a word from Christ, his power going along with it, will enable men to believe, as it did Thomas; which appears by what follows.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on John 20:27". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/john-20.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither … behold … put it into my side, and be not faithless, but believing — “There is something rhythmical in these words, and they are purposely couched in the words of Thomas himself, to put him to shame” [Luthardt]. But wish what condescension and gentleness is this done!

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 20:27". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/john-20.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

Reach hither thy finger. Turning to the skeptical Thomas, he asks him to apply the tests that he had declared would be necessary before he could believe. His compassion for the unbelief of Thomas shows the patient tenderness of the Savior with the difficulties of an honest seeker.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on John 20:27". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/john-20.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Then saith he to Thomas (ειτα λεγει τωι Τομαιeita legei tōi Thomāi). Jesus turns directly to Thomas as if he had come expressly for his sake. He reveals his knowledge of the doubt in the mind of Thomas and mentions the very tests that he had named (John 20:25).

Be not faithless (μη γινου απιστοςmē ginou apistos). Present middle imperative of γινομαιginomai in prohibition, “stop becoming disbelieving.” The doubt of Thomas in the face of the witness of the others was not a proof of his superior intelligence. Sceptics usually pose as persons of unusual mentality. The medium who won Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to spiritualism has confessed that it was all humbug, but he deceived the gullible novelist. But Thomas had carried his incredulity too far. Note play on απιστοςapistos (disbelieving) and πιστοςpistos (believing).

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on John 20:27". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/john-20.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Be not ( μὴ γίνου )

Literally, become not. Thomas was in a fair way to become unbelieving, through his doubt of the resurrection.

Faithless - believing ( ἄπιστος - πιστός )

There is a correspondence of the words here, to which, perhaps, the nearest approach in English is unbelieving, believing.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on John 20:27". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/john-20.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

The Fourfold Gospel

Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and see my hands; and reach [hither] thy hand, and put it into my side1: and be not faithless, but believing.

  1. Reach hither thy finger, and see my hands; and reach [hither] thy hand, and put it into my side. Thomas had proposed an infallible test, and Jesus now cheerfully submits to it.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on John 20:27". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/john-20.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE APPEARANCE TO THOMAS

‘Then saith He to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold My bands; and reach hither thy band, and thrust it into My side: and be not faithless, but believing.’

John 20:27

What was the nature of Thomas’s doubt? It was, I think, partly constitutional. Thomas was a thorough pessimist. Some people are too certain and sanguine about everything in the world; Thomas was too negative. But Thomas’s doubt was also partly preventible. He made a very great mistake. When Jesus showed Himself to His disciples, Thomas, one of the Twelve, was not with them when Jesus came. One of the Twelve and not with them! We can imagine him in his lodging crouching over the wooden table, his head buried in his hands, his whole attitude bespeaking utter dejection. No cry, no sob, to relieve that stony, blank misery. Poor, lonely, doubting Thomas! Did he but know, over the road in the upper room His Master was showing His hands and his feet. Thomas’s doubt was a little bit wilful, too. ‘We have seen the Lord,’ was the message that came to him, but with hard, dry, sceptical eyes he shook his head in his surly way. Is not that true to human nature?

I. The solution of doubt.—For all doubting ones, and for all life’s doubting moments, I have a message. Take care that your doubts are honest ones. Many people’s doubts are not. Nothing is so fatal as indifferent doubt. But in Thomas there was not a trace of dishonest doubt. Gloomy he was, lonely he was, wilful he might have been, but he was in earnest, he was in deadly earnest. So he found the light; and in your dark hours be of good cheer. God will reveal Himself to you, and Christ will enter again into your hearts and lives, only this time with a power and strength which you never felt before, the strength of His risen life. Only let me give you this word of advice. Look for Christ where His people are and where His followers meet together. Thomas found Christ where His followers were gathered together; so may you and I and any poor lonely doubter in the whole wide world.

II. Contact with Christ.—Doubts will come, even to Christian people. But doubt is not in itself sinful. Never think because you are perplexed and uncertain about Christian things that such thoughts are sinful, and never treat others as if they were. Be quite sure that your doubt is honest doubt and, if you truly long and are seeking for the truth, you need have no fears. What Thomas asked for was contact with Christ, that he might be allowed to touch Him. Then he would believe; and it is what people need in the present day—contact with Christ. It is true that Thomas was thinking of a material contact; but when he came face to face with Christ and heard His voice he forgot all about proofs. As has been beautifully said, Christianity shrinks from no proof, but it transcends all. Christ will meet you here, and you will ask for nothing else, only Christ, and like Thomas you will cry, ‘My Lord and my God.’

—Rev. F. W. Dankes.

Illustration

‘When Dr. Arnold of Rugby lay a-dying, he was seen, we are told, lying still with his hands clasped, his lips moving, and his eyes raised to heaven. And they thought he was praying, but suddenly they heard him say, clearly and distinctly, “Jesus said, Thomas, because thou hast seen Me thou hast believed; blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed.”’

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Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on John 20:27". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/john-20.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

27 Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faithless, but believing.

Ver. 27. Then saith he to Thomas] Who was not excommunicated by the rest, but gently borne with, till Christ should cure him. Neither did he forsake their meetings, though he believed not their relation. It is good to stand in Christ’s way, to be found at the foddering place, Song of Solomon 1:8. But some, like spiritual vagabonds, as Cain, excammunicate themselves from God’s presence, in the use of the means; we may write, Lord, have mercy upon such, as utterly deplored.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on John 20:27". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/john-20.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

John 20:27

(with Hebrews 4:3)

St. Thomas—Faith Triumphant in Doubt

I. Two sorts of language are held respecting faith and belief; each combining in itself, as often happens, a curious mixture of truth and error. The one insists that belief is a thing wholly independent of our will, depending simply on the greater or less force of the evidence set before our minds; and that therefore, as faith can be no virtue, so unbelief can be no sin. The other pronounces that all unbelief arises out of an evil heart, and a dislike to the truths taught; nay, that if any man even disbelieves any proposition not properly religious in itself, but generally taught along with such as are religious, he cannot be considering the truth or falsehood of the particular question, simply as it is in itself true or false, but must disbelieve, because he has a dislike to other truths which are really religious. The two passages which I have chosen together for my text, will illustrate the question before us. The belief by which we enter into God's rest is clearly something moral. The unbelief of the apostle Thomas, which could not at once embrace the fact of the Lord's resurrection, assuredly arose from no wish or feeling in his mind against it.

II. The unbelief which is a sin is, to speak generally, an unbelief of God's commandment, or of anything which He has told us, because we wish it not to be true. The unbelief which may be no sin, is a disbelief of God's promises, because we think them too good to be true; in other words, the believing not for joy; or again, the disbelief of such points about which our wishes are purely indifferent; we neither desire to believe nor have any reluctance to do so, but simply the evidence is not sufficient to convince us. Is our unbelief that of the apostle Thomas? No, I believe most rarely. Our unbelief is an unbelief of anything rather than of the truth of Christ's promises; our difficulty lies anywhere else but there. Our unbelief relates to Christ's warnings, to His solemn declarations of the necessity of devoting ourselves wholly to His service, to His assurances that there will be a judgment to try the very heart and reins, and a punishment for those who are condemned in that judgment, beyond all that our worst fears can reach to. It is not to such unbelievers that Christ reveals Himself. The gracious words, "Reach hither thy finger, and behold My hands," will never be spoken to them. The faith we need is a faith not of words but of feeling; not contented with merely not denying, but with its whole heart and soul affirming.

T. Arnold, Sermons, vol. v., p. 223.


The Place of the Senses in Religion

I. A first object of our Lord's words in the text was, we may dare to say, to place the truth of His resurrection from the dead beyond doubt in the mind of St. Thomas. It was more important to Thomas that he should be convinced of the truth of the resurrection than that he should first learn the unreasonableness of his motive for hesitating to believe it; and therefore our Lord meets him on his own terms. Thomas, though unreasonable, should be gratified; he should know by sensible pressure of his hand and finger, that he had before him no unsubstantial phantom form, but the very body that was crucified, answering in each open wound to the touch of sense, whatever new properties might have also attached to it.

II. And a second lesson to be learnt from these words of our Lord is the true value of the bodily senses in the investigation of truth. There are certain terms which they, and they only, can ascertain, and in verifying which they may and must be trusted. It is a false spiritualism which would cast discredit on the bodily senses acting within their own province. It is false to the constitution of nature, for if the bodily senses are untrustworthy, how can we assume the trustworthiness of the spiritual senses? Religion does touch the material world at certain points, and the reality of its contact is to be decided, like all material facts, by the experiment of bodily sense. Whether our Lord really rose with His wounded body from the grave or not, was a question to be settled by the senses of St. Thomas, and our Lord, therefore, submitted Himself to the exacting terms which St. Thomas laid down as the conditions of faith.

III. And we learn, thirdly, from our Lord's words how to deal with doubts of the truth of religion, whether in ourselves or other people. Our Lord's prescription for dealing with doubt may be summed up in this rule—make the most of such truth as you still recognise, and the rest will follow. Thomas did not doubt the report of his senses. Well, then, let him make the most of that report. There is an intercommunication between truth and truth which lies in the nature of things, and the sway and guidance of which cannot be resisted by an honest mind; so that when any one truth is really grasped as true, the soul is in a fair way to recover healthiness of tone, and to put an end to the miserable reign of vagueness and doubt.

H. P. Liddon, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxi., p. 257.


References: John 20:27.—Contemporary Pulpit, vol. v., p. 278; R. Maguire, Church of England Pulpit, vol. i., p. 252; Spurgeon, My Sermon Notes: Gospels and Acts, p. 169; E. Boaden, Christian World Pulpit, vol. i., p. 404; J. Keble, Sermons on Various Occasions, p. 177; Three Hundred Outlines from the New Testament, p. 104; T. Birkett Dover, A Lent Manual, p. 54. John 20:27, John 20:28.—G. Brooks, Five Hundred Outlines, p. 68; T. J. Crawford, The Preaching of the Cross, p. 156. John 20:27-29.—Clergyman's Magazine, vol. i., p. 341.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on John 20:27". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/john-20.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

John 20:27. Reach hither thy finger, &c.— It is observable, that our Lord here repeats the very words which Thomas had made use of; and thus demonstrated, not only that he was risen, but also that he was possessed of divine knowledge, from his being conscious of the words and actions of men, though spoken or done in secret. It is observable also, that Spinosa himself could find out no more plausible objections against this evidence of the resurrection of Christ, than to say that the disciples were deceived in what they imagined they saw, heard, and felt; which if granted, would be in effect to allow, that no men could be competent judges of any fact whatsoever relating to their own sensations; and, consequently, would overthrow all human testimony.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on John 20:27". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/john-20.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

27.] Our Lord says nothing of the τύπος τῶν ἥλων—He does not recall the malice of his enemies.

The words imply that the marks were no scars, but the veritable wounds themselves;—that in His side being large enough for a hand to be thrust into it. This of itself would shew that the resurrection Body was bloodless. It is φέρε κ. ἴδε in the case of the hands, which were exposed—but merely φέρε κ. βάλε in the case of the side, which was clothed. So Meyer: but query?

μὴ γ. ἄπιστ., not merely, ‘Do not any longer disbelieve in my Resurrection;’—but Be not (do not become)—as applied generally to the spiritual life, and the reception of God’s truth—faithless, but believing. The E. V. is excellent.

That Thomas did not apply his finger or his hand, is evident from ὅτι ἑώρακάς με below.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on John 20:27". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/john-20.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

John 20:27. τῶ θωμᾷ, to Thomas) He had previously believed: on this account he is not even now cast away.— φέρε, reach) apply to.— τὶν δάκτυλόν σου, thy finger) Thomas’ own words are retorted upon him: how must he have been astonished, we may suppose, at the omniscience and goodness of the Saviour! If a Pharisee had spoken thus, unless I shall see, etc., he would have obtained nothing; but to a disciple that has been formerly approved of, there is nothing that is not given.— ὧδε, hither) The Demonstrative.— ἴδε) touch and see. Thomas had said, ἐὰν μὴ ἴδω, unless I shall see.— πιστὸς, believing) He had said, I will not believe.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on John 20:27". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/john-20.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

We had need take heed what we speak wherever we are. Christ had not after his resurrection so ordinary and frequent a converse with his disciples as before. This is the fifth time that we read of Christ’s appearing to them since his resurrection. He knew what words of unbelief Thomas had uttered, and accordingly applies himself to him, in a wonderful condescension to his weakness; he bids him reach his finger, and his hands, and behold his hands, and thrust his hands into his side. So pitiful is our Lord, and compassionate towards the infirmities of his people.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on John 20:27". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/john-20.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Reach hither thy finger; this showed that Jesus knew what Thomas had said.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on John 20:27". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/john-20.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

27.Thrust it into my side—Not in every case are the exactions and tests of scepticism thus complied with by God. Thomas has every proof he demands. He, the man of sense, has the highest proof that sense can have.

Into my side—This is not only body, but the body of the living Jesus; nay, the risen body of the slain Jesus The resurrection body voluntarily retains the wounds which it is perfectly able to shed from itself, as testimony that he is not only living, but was dead. See note on Luke 24:39. And this illustrates how Jesus may forever, as our high priest, exhibits in his own person the tokens of his death for our eternal life.

Be not faithlessRenounce the scepticism of will, and become in heart and purpose believing.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on John 20:27". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/john-20.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Jesus then invited Thomas to satisfy himself that He really was the crucified Jesus, as Thomas had said he would have to do to believe that Jesus was alive. Jesus knew what Thomas had said even though He had not been physically present when he had said it. This is a further implication of Jesus" deity. The purpose of this test was not just to satisfy Thomas" curiosity, however. It was to bring him to faith that Jesus was the resurrected Messiah. We could render Jesus" statement literally, "Do not be unbelieving but believing."

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on John 20:27". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/john-20.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

John 20:27. Then saith he to Thomas, Beach hither thy finger, and see my hands; and reach thy hand and put it into my side, and be not unbelieving but believing. Jesus at once speaks without needing to be told of the doubts of Thomas. At the same time he recognises the naturalness of that element of weakness which marked the faith of His disciple, and He will so meet it that it may give place to strength. As before, under the word ‘believing’ we must understand not belief in the Resurrection only, but a full faith in Jesus Himself as the Saviour who has triumphed over all His foes, and has completely accomplished the purposes of His love.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on John 20:27". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/john-20.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

John 20:27. . He does not need to be informed of Thomas’ incredulity; although it is quite possible that, as Lücke supposes, the others had mentioned it to Him. Still, this is not in the text. Cf. Weiss, who also quotes Bengel’s characteristic note: “Si Pharisaeus ita dixisset Nisi videro, etc., nil impetrasset; sed discipulo pridem probato nil non datur,”. Weiss supposes the hands were seen ( ), the side only touched under the clothes. Some suppose that as the feet are not mentioned in this passage, they had not been nailed but only bound to the cross. See Lücke’s interesting note. , “Incredulitas aliquid habet de voluntario”.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on John 20:27". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/john-20.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Put in thy finger hither. Christ, to shew he knew all things, made use of the very same words in which St. Thomas had expressed his incredulous dispositions. Our blessed Redeemer would have the mark of the spear, and the prints of the nails to remain in his glorified body, to convince them it was the same body: and that they might be for ever marks of his victory and triumph over sin and the devil. The evangelist does not say, that St. Thomas went and touched Christ's body, though it is very probable he did as he was ordered. But how could a body that entered in, when the doors were shut, be felt, or be palpable? St. John Chrysostom(2) answers, that Christ at that time permitted his body to be palpable, and to resist another body, to induce St. Thomas to believe the resurrection; and that when he pleased, his body could not be felt. In like manner, his body was either visible or invisible, as he had a will it should be. In fine, he could eat in their sight, though he stood not in need of any nourishment. See St. Augustine.

Be not incredulous, but faithful. In the Greek, be not an unbeliever, but a believer. --- My Lord, and my God; that is, I confess thee to be my Lord, and my God; and with the Greek article, to be him, that is, the Lord, and the God. (Witham)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on John 20:27". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/john-20.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Reach hither = Bring here.

behold. Greek. ide. App-133.

be = become.

faithless. Greek. apistos = unbelieving.

believing. App-150.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on John 20:27". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/john-20.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faithless, but believing.

Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it. This is here rather too strong a word. Probably 'put it'-as the same word [ balloo (Greek #906)] is rendered in John 10:4 - is the right English word here.

Into my side: and be not faithless, but believing. These words of Jesus, as Luthardt remarks, have something rhythmical in them. There are two parallel members, with an exhortation referring to both. And Jesus speaks purposely in the words of Thomas himself, that, as Lampe says, he might be covered with shame. But with what condescension and gentleness is this done!

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on John 20:27". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/john-20.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

27. Put your finger here. Jesus had just “passed through” locked doors, which would imply to them he was a ghost. Now he tells Thomas to “put him to the test” to see and feel the REALNESS of his Resurrection.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on John 20:27". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/john-20.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(27) Then saith. he to Thomas . . .—This implies a knowledge of the words of John 20:25, which in itself would carry conviction to the mind of Thomas. This repetition must have carried with this conviction a sense of shame at his unbelief.

And be not faithless, but believing.—Better, and become not unbelieving, but believing. The words do not apply to the fact of the Resurrection only, but to the general spiritual condition of the Apostle. He was in danger of passing from the state of a believer in Christ to that of an unbeliever. His demand for the evidence of the senses was a step backward, a resting on the less, not on the more, certain. His Master would have him retrace that step, and become one who rests upon the intuition of the Spirit.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on John 20:27". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/john-20.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faithless, but believing.
Reach hither thy finger
25; Psalms 78:38; 103:13,14; Romans 5:20; 1 Timothy 1:14-16; 1 John 1:1,2
reach hither thy hand
1 John 1:1
and be
Matthew 17:17; Mark 9:19; Luke 9:41; 1 Timothy 1:14
Reciprocal: Genesis 45:12 - your eyes;  Exodus 4:5 - That they;  Psalm 22:16 - they pierced;  Isaiah 42:3 - bruised;  Matthew 6:30 - O ye;  Matthew 27:35 - they crucified;  Mark 16:14 - and upbraided;  Luke 24:39 - my hands;  John 20:17 - Touch;  John 20:20 - he showed;  Romans 4:19 - being;  Philippians 4:19 - God;  Hebrews 3:1 - consider

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on John 20:27". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/john-20.html.