Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Joshua 9:5

and worn-out and patched sandals on their feet, and worn-out clothes on themselves; and all the bread of their provision was dry and had become crumbled.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Confidence;   Contracts;   Craftiness;   Deception;   Diplomacy;   Joshua;   Kirjath-Jearim;   Magnanimity;   Oath;   Treaty;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Amorites, the;   Bread;   Garments;   Gibeonites;   Shoes;   Travellers;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Dress;   Gibeon;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - All-Sufficiency of God;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Alliance;   Cake;   Gibeon;   Mouldy;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Sandal;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Joshua, the Book of;   Mouldy;   Transportation and Travel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Clout;   Gibeon;   Israel;   Joshua;   Stranger;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Alliance;   Clouted;   Gibeon ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Clouted;   Gibeon;   Journeyings of israel from egypt to canaan;   Nethinim;   Obsolete or obscure words in the english av bible;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Clouted,;   Gib'eon;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Conquest of Canaan;   Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Clout;   Shoe;   Spot;   Tears;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Alliances;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Bread;   Gibeon and Gibeonites;   Goat;   Hivites;   Sandals;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Old shoes and clouted - Their sandals, they pretended had been worn out by long and difficult travelling, and they had been obliged to have them frequently patched during the way; their garments also were worn thin; and what remained of their bread was mouldy - spotted with age, or, as our old version has it, bored - pierced with many holes by the vermin which had bred in it, through the length of the time it had been in their sacks; and this is the most literal meaning of the original נקדים nikkudim, which means spotted or pierced with many holes. The old and clouted shoes have been a subject of some controversy: the Hebrew word בלות baloth signifies worn out, from בלה balah, to wear away; and מטלאות metullaoth, from טלא tala, to spot or patch, i.e., spotted with patches. Our word clouted, in the Anglo-Saxon signifies seamed up, patched; from clout, rag, or small piece of cloth, used for piecing or patching. But some suppose the word here comes from clouet, the diminutive of clou, a small nail, with which the Gibeonites had fortified the soles of their shoes, to prevent them from wearing out in so long a journey; but this seems very unlikely; and our old English term clouted - seamed or patched - expresses the spirit of the Hebrew word.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Joshua 9:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/joshua-9.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And old shoes and clouted upon their feet,.... Which being worn out, were patched with various pieces of leather:

and old garments upon them; full of holes and rents, ragged and patched:

and the bread of their provision was dry and mouldy; having been kept a long time, and unfit for use; or like cakes over baked and burnt, as the Targum and Jarchi: the word for "mouldy" signifies pricked, pointed, spotted, as mouldy bread has in it spots of different colours, as white, red, green, and black, as Kimchi and Ben Melech interpret it; or it signifies bread so dry, as Ben Gersom notes, that it crumbles into pieces easily, with which the Vulgate Latin version agrees; or rather through being long kept, it was become dry and hard like crusts, so NoldiusF9P. 379. No. 1218. ; or very hard, like bread twice baked, as CastellF11Lex. Colossians 2395. .

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Joshua 9:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/joshua-9.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

old shoes and clouted — Those who have but one ass or mule for themselves and baggage frequently dismount and walk - a circumstance which may account for the worn shoes of the pretended travelers.

bread … dry and mouldy — This must have been that commonly used by travelers - a sort of biscuit made in the form of large rings, about an inch thick, and four or five inches in diameter. Not being so well baked as our biscuits, it becomes hard and mouldy from the moisture left in the dough. It is usually soaked in water previous to being used.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Joshua 9:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/joshua-9.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Joshua 9:5 And old shoes and clouted upon their feet, and old garments upon them; and all the bread of their provision was dry [and] mouldy.

Ver. 5. And old shoes and clouted.] Papists, boasting so much of antiquity, are by one not unfitly compared to these Gibeonites with their old shoes and mouldy bread. Antiquity disjoined from verity is but filthy hoariness, and deserveth no more reverence than an old fornicator, who is so much the more odious because old. It is here at best, as in books, some of which are odorandae rubiginis, of greater antiquity than authority. Those were old things spoken of in 1 Chronicles 4:22, but no whit the better for that.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Joshua 9:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/joshua-9.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ver. 5. And old shoes, and clouted, upon their feet, &c.— The Hebrew is, shoes spotted, i.e. of divers colours, by reason of their having been spoiled by the clay and dust; and pieced, as if worn out by the length of the journey; with clothes suited to their shoes, and their bread dry and mouldy. In the Hebrew it is bread dry, and נקדים nikkudim; that is to say, literally, pricked, speckled; so they call the cakes pierced with several holes. Buxtorf speaks of them in his Synag. Jude 1:25; Jude 1:12. Perhaps, therefore, it should be translated, and their bread was dry, like cakes, or biscuits. Calmet is of this opinion, which he confirms by the testimony of Jonathan, and other circumstances.

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Joshua 9:5". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/joshua-9.html. 1801-1803.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5.Old shoes and clouted — Or, as the Hebrew, shoes fallen into pieces, and botched or cobbled. In long journeys the traveller walks up the hills that he may spare the heavily laden beast. These shoes in tatters and patches indicate many a walk, and hence a long journey. [The somewhat antiquated English word clouted, from the Anglo-Saxon clut, a little cloth or patch, accurately expresses the sense of the Hebrew שׂלא, to patch, to mend. It may be used of patching with cloth, leather, or other material.]

Old garments upon them — That is, upon themselves, and not upon their feet.

Dry and mouldy — The Vulgate says, instead of mouldy, broken up into crumbs, and this seems to be the true rendering. The Septuagint adds offensive to the smell. Ancient inns or caravanserais provided the sojourner with lodging only; hence he must carry his food. See note on Joshua 2:1.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Joshua 9:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/joshua-9.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Patches. Hebrew, "spotted," or of different colours, like shoes worn out and spoiled with dirt. --- Pieces. Hebrew, is translated, "dry, burnt, eaten, mouldy," &c. But it means fine thin bread, or wafers, (3 Kings xiv. 3,) full of holes. The Israelites partook of this bread, which they would hardly have done if it had been mouldy. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Joshua 9:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/joshua-9.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

clouted = patched (Anglo-Saxon, clut.)

mouldy = become crumbly.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Joshua 9:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/joshua-9.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And old shoes and clouted upon their feet, and old garments upon them; and all the bread of their provision was dry and mouldy.

Old shoes and clouted. Those who have only one donkey or mule for themselves and baggage frequently dismount and walk-a circumstance which may account for the worn shoes of the pretended travelers.

Bread ... dry and mouldy. This must have been that commonly used by travelers-a sort of biscuit made in the form of large rings, about an inch thick and four or five inches in diameter. Not being so well baked as our biscuits, it becomes hard and mouldy, from the moisture left in the dough. It is usually soaked in water previous to being used.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Joshua 9:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/joshua-9.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) Clouted—i.e., patched.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Joshua 9:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/joshua-9.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And old shoes and clouted upon their feet, and old garments upon them; and all the bread of their provision was dry and mouldy.
old shoes
13; Deuteronomy 29:5; 33:25; Luke 15:22
clouted
The word clouted signifies here patched, from the Anglo-Saxon clut, a clout or rag; and not nailed from the French clou, a nail.
Reciprocal: Joshua 9:12 - our bread

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Joshua 9:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/joshua-9.html.