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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 1:18

Zacharias said to the angel, "How will I know this for certain? For I am an old man and my wife is advanced in years."

Adam Clarke Commentary

Whereby shall I know this? - All things are possible to God: no natural impediment can have any power when God has declared he will accomplish his purpose. He has a right to be believed on his own word alone; and it is impious, when we are convinced that it is his word, to demand a sign or pledge for its fulfillment.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Whereby shall I know this? - The thing was improbable, and he desired “evidence” that it would take place. The testimony of an “angel,” and in such a place, should have been proof enough; but people are slow to believe the testimony of heavenly messengers. As a consequence of not believing, he was struck mute.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-1.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And Zacharias said unto the angel, Whereby shall I know this? for I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years.

There was an element of unbelief in this question which, in effect, denied the possibility of what the angel had promised, contrasting sharply with the submissive belief of the virgin Mary in this narrative.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Zacharias said unto the angel, whereby shall I know this?.... Notwithstanding such an appearance of an angel to him, which in those times was not so usual, and this in the holy place; and the things themselves which were told him, and these as the return of prayer; yet he distrusted, and wanted a sign, whereby he might know the truth of them, as the Jews were generally desirous of, and as the father of them was; who expressed himself in much such language, on a certain occasion, as this his son did; see Genesis 15:8.

For I am an old man; at least sixty years of age; for with the Jews, sixty years were reckoned, לזקנה, "for old age"F23Misn. Abot, c. 5. sect. 21. & Maimon. in ib. ; and a man of these years, was accounted an old man: and the Jewish Rabbins observeF24R. Sol. Urbin. Ohel Moed, fol. 24. 2. , that the word for old age in Job 30:2 is by "gematry, sixty"; that is, the letters of the word, numerically make so much. The Mahometan writers, as before observed on Luke 1:7 make him to be ninety nine years of age: he was not discharged from service; the Levites were at fifty, but not the priests; blemishes, as the Jewish writers sayF25T. Bab. Cholin, fol. 24. 1. , made them unfit for service, but years did not: and even the law concerning the Levites, they sayF26Maimon. Hilch. Cele Hamikdash, c. 3. sect. 8. , only respected the time they carried the sanctuary from place to place, and not future generations; and that they are disqualified neither by blemishes, nor by years, only by voice, for singing of the song; but then they might be among the porters; so that they were not on that account laid aside from all service:

and my wife well stricken in years. The Mahometan writers, as before, say, she was "eighty nine"; a like objection Abraham made, though he afterwards got over it, and was strong in faith, giving glory to God, believing in his power and faithfulness; see Genesis 17:17.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-1.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Whereby, etc. — Mary believed what was far harder without a sign. Abraham, though older, and doubtless Sarah, too, when the same promise was made to him, “staggered not at the promise of God through unbelief, but was strong in faith, giving glory to God.” This was that in which Zacharias failed.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

18. And Zacharias said unto the angel, Whereby shall I know this? for I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years.

[For I am an old man.] If so old a man, why then was he not sequestered from the service of the Temple by the law of superannuation? Numbers 4:3, 8:24,25. Hear what the Rabbins say in this case:

"There is something that is lawful in the priests, that is unlawful in the Levites: and there is something lawful in the Levites, that is unlawful in the priests. The Rabbins deliver; the priests upon any blemish are unfit; as for their years they are not unfit; the Levites for their years may be unfit, but by reason of blemish are not. From that which is said, that at the age of fifty years they shall cease waiting, we learn that years may make the Levites unfit. Perhaps the priests also are made unfit through years: and indeed, does it not seem in equity, that if the Levites, whom a blemish doth not make unfit, should yet be made unfit by superannuation, should not much more the priests be made unfit by superannuation, when even a spot or blemish will make them unfit? But the text saith, This is the law of the Levites; not, This is the law of the priests. The Rabbins deliver: What time a priest comes to maturity, till he grow old, he is fit to minister; and yet a spot or blemish makes him unfit. The Levite from his thirtieth to his fiftieth year is fit for service; but being superannuated, he becomes unfit. How must this be understood concerning the Levites? To wit, for that time wherein the ark was in the wilderness: but at Shiloh and in the Temple they were not rendered unfit, unless through the defect of their voice."


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Bibliography
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-1.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

Whereby shall I know this? He wanted a sign.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-1.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Whereby (κατα τιkata ti). According to what. It was too good to be true and Zacharias demanded proof and gives the reason (for, γαρgar) for his doubt. He had prayed for this blessing and was now sceptical like the disciples in the house of Mary about the return of Peter (Acts 12:14.).


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Whereby ( κατὰ τί )

Lit., according to what? It demands a standard of knowledge, a sign.

For

I require a sign, for I am old.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Zacharias said unto the angel, Whereby shall I know this? for I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years.

Zacharias said, Whereby shall I know this? — In how different a spirit did he blessed virgin say, How shall this be? Zacharias disbelieved the fact: Mary had no doubt of the thing; but only inquired concerning the manner of it.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-1.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And Zacharias said unto the angel, Whereby shall I know this1? for I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years2.

  1. Whereby shall I know this? In asking for a sign Zacharias showed his unbelief (Matthew 12:38,39). His question in the original is in four words. Four faithless words cost him forty weeks of silence.

  2. For I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years. So said Abraham (Genesis 17:17). The law which retired Levites from service at the age of fifty years (Numbers 8:25,26) did not apply to priests. They served to extreme old age.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-1.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

And Zacharias said to the angel Next follows the doubt of Zacharias, and the punishment which the Lord inflicted on his unbelief. He had prayed that he might obtain offspring, and now that it is promised, he distrusts, as if he had forgotten his own prayers and faith. It might, at first sight, appear harsh that God is so much offended by his reply. He brings forward his old age as an objection. Abraham did the same; and yet his faith is so highly applauded that Paul declares, he

“considered not his own body now dead, neither yet the deadness of Sarah’s womb,” (Romans 4:19,)

but unhesitatingly relied on the truth and power of God. Zacharias inquires how, or by what proof, he might arrive at certainty. But Gideon was not blamed for twice asking a sign, (Jude 6:17.) Nay more, we are shortly after this informed of Mary’s objection, How shall this be, since I know not a man? ( ver. 34,) which the angel passes over as if it contained nothing wrong. How comes it then that God punishes Zacharias so severely, as if he had been guilty of a very heinous sin? I do acknowledge that, if the words only are considered, either all were equally to blame, or Zacharias did nothing wrong. But as the actions and words of men must be judged from the state of the heart, we ought rather to abide by the judgment of God, to whom the hidden secrets of the heart are naked and opened, (Hebrews 4:13.)

Unquestionably, the Lord beheld in Zacharias something worse than his words may bear, and therefore his anger was kindled against him for throwing back with distrust the promised favor. We have no right, indeed, to lay down a law to God which would not leave him free to punish in one the fault which he pardons in others. But it is very evident that the case of Zacharias was widely different from that of Abraham, or Gideon, or Mary. This does not appear in the words; and therefore the knowledge of it must be left to God, whose eyes pierce the depths of the heart. Thus God distinguishes between Sarah’s laugh (Genesis 18:12) and Abraham’s, (Genesis 17:17,) though the one apparently does not differ from the other. The reason why Zacharias doubted was, that, stopping at the ordinary course of nature, he ascribed less than he ought to have done to the power of God. They take a narrow and disparaging view of the works of God, who believe that he will do no more than nature holds out to be probable, as if his hand were limited to our senses or confined to earthly means. But it belongs to faith to believe that more can be done than carnal reason admits. Zacharias had no hesitation with regard to its being the voice of God, but as he looked too exclusively at the world, an indirect doubt arose in his mind if what he had heard would really happen. In that respect he did no slight injury to God, for he went so far as to reason with himself, whether God, who had undoubtedly spoken to him, should be regarded as worthy of credit.

At the same time, we ought to know that Zacharias was not so unbelieving as to turn aside wholly from the faith; for there is a general faith which embraces the promise of eternal salvation and the testimony of a free adoption. On the other hand, when God has once received us into favor, he gives us many special promises, — that he will feed us, will deliver us from dangers, will vindicate our reputation, will protect our life; — and so there is a special faith which answers particularly to each of these promises. Thus, it will sometimes happen, that one who trusts in God for the pardon of his sins, and for salvation, will waver on some point, — will be too much alarmed by the dread of death, too solicitous about daily food, or too anxious about his plans. Such was the unbelief of Zacharias; for while he held the root and foundation of faith, he hesitated only on one point, whether God would give to him a son. Let us know, therefore, that those who are perplexed or disturbed by weakness on some particular occasion do not entirely depart or fall off from the faith, and that, though the branches of faith are agitated by various tempests, it does not give way at the root. Besides, nothing was farther from the intention of Zacharias than to call in question the truth of a divine promise; but while he was convinced generally that God is faithful, he was cunningly drawn by the craft and wiles of Satan to draw a wicked distinction. It is all the more necessary for us to keep diligent watch: for which of us shall be secure against the snares of the devil, when we learn that a man so eminently holy, who had all his life maintained strict watchfulness over himself, was overtaken by them?


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-1.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

18 And Zacharias said unto the angel, Whereby shall I know this? for I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years.

Ver. 18. For I am an old man] Thus reason will be encroaching upon the bounds of faith, till she be taken captive by infidelity. Drive, therefore, Hagar out of doors.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 1:18. And Zacharias said, &c.— In the Old Testament there are instances of holy men, who, on occasions like this, spake as Zacharias is said to have done; and who, instead of being reproved, are greatly commended for their faith. (Compare Genesis 15:8 with Romans 4:19-20.) Nevertheless, the treatment which he met with, will not appear hard, when it is considered that the dispositions of his mind were very different from those of the persons mentioned. They believed the messages which were brought them, and desired to be confirmed in the faith thereof; consequently the language of their demand was, "Lord, I believe; help mine unbelief." Whereas Zacharias hardly believed at all, or was exceedingly doubtful. This we are expressly told, Luke 1:20. His sin therefore was great, and his punishment just; and the more so, as he could not but often have read the account which the Scripture gives of the births of Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Samson, Samuel, &c. all descended from mothers who had been long barren. The resemblance in circumstances might well have produced a peculiar regard to them, and one would have imagined that he should immediately have recollected the history of the angel's appearance to Manoah in particular. See Judges 13:2-14.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-1.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, Zacharias being slow to believe so strange a message; asks the angel, by what sign he should know that this thing, so far above the usual course of nature, should come to pass?

The angel answers, that he was dispatched by God as a messenger extraordinary, to declare this good news to him. And seeing he was so hard to believe it, and required a sign, he should have it, but such an one as should be a punishment of his unbelief, as well as a sign to confirm his faith; namely, he should from thenceforeward, to the birth of the child, be dumb and deaf, as the original word signifies; because he had not hearkened to the angel's speech, he was struck deaf; and because he had gain-said it, he was made dumb.

Learn hence, that the word of God in the mouth of his messengers is God's own word, and as such to be received and believed.

2. That not believing their word, is a sin which God will severely punish; it is all one not to believe God, and not to believe the messengers of God speaking from him. Some expositors will have this dumbness of Zacharias to be prefigurative. The priest, at the dismission of the people, when the service of the temple was finished, was to pronounce the blessing recorded, Numbers 6:24-25 which when Zacharias was about to do, he was struck dumb and could not perform it; signifying thereby, that the silencing of the Levitical priesthood was now at hand: that they must expect another kind of worship, and that he who was able to bless indeed, namely, the Messias, was near at hand.

Observe lastly, that though Zacharias ceased to speak, yet he did not cease to minister; he takes not his dumbness for a dismission, but stays out the eight days of his course, knowing that the service of his heart and hand would be accepted of that God which had bereaved him of his tongue. The powers which we have we must make use of in the public service of God, who will accept us according to what we have; pardoning our infirmity, and rewarding our sincerity.


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Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-1.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

18.] The birth of John, involving human generation, but prophetically announced, and supernatural, answers to the birth of Isaac in the O.T.

But Abraham’s faith was a strong contrast to the unbelief of Zacharias: see Romans 4:19. De Wette, without noticing the above remark (which is Olshausen’s), says, “the same doubt, which Abraham also entertained in a similar case;” so that we have here, as often elsewhere, in the interpretation of Scripture (Genesis 15:6; Genesis 15:8; Genesis 17:17; Genesis 18:12), De Wette versus Paul (Rom. as above):—the fact being, that the case Genesis 15:8 was not similar.

πρεσβύτης] The Levites (see Numbers 4:3; Numbers 8:24-25) became superannuated at the age of fifty: but it appears, by extracts from the Rabbinical writings given by Lightfoot, that this was not the case with the priests.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-1.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 1:18. Like Abraham’s question, Genesis 15:8.

κατὰ τί] According to what. Zacharias asks after a σημεῖον (Luke 2:12), in conformity with which he should know that what had been promised ( τοῦτο)—in other words, the birth of a son, with whom the indicated destination of Elias should associate itself—had really occurred.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-1.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 1:18. κατὰ τί γνώσομαι) So LXX., Genesis 15:8. The question of Zacharias is one affecting the very fact itself, thus betraying that he laboured under a want of faith: the πῶς, how, which Mary started as a question, was accompanied with faith: comp. Luke 1:34 [How?] with 45 [“Blessed is she that believed.”]


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The words are much the same with those of Abraham, Genesis 15:8, Whereby shall I know that I shall inherit it, viz. the land of Canaan? And Mary, Luke 1:34, when the same angel had told her she should have a child, Luke 1:31, saith, How shall this be, seeing I know not a man? Gideon also asked a sign, Jude 6:17. To our appearance and judgment there seemeth no great difference betwixt these and Zacharias in this place asking a sign, only Zacharias here opposeth his own sense and reason to the words of the angel, yet we shall hear a different issue of this question, or answer to it.


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 1:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-1.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The testimony of God is the highest and most conclusive of all evidence. The disbelief of it exposes men to his righteous displeasure, and deprives them of rich blessings which they might otherwise enjoy.


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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

18. ἐγὼ γάρ εἰμι πρεσβύτης. The emphasis is on the I, which is therefore expressed. So “Abraham fell upon his face, and laughed, and said in his heart, Shall a child be born unto him that is a hundred years old?” Genesis 17:17. But he had believed the original promise (Genesis 15:6) though he asked for a confirmation of it (Luke 1:8). “He believed … God who quickeneth the dead,” Romans 4:17.

ἐν ταῖς ἡμέραις αὐτῆς. This is a Hebraism.


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"Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-1.html. 1896.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And Zacharias said to the angel, “By what means will I know this? For I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years.” ’

But this was all too much for Zacharias. As he thought back on those long years of childlessness, how could he now expect a son to be born to him, and especially one in whom such wonderful things would be fulfilled? It was beyond belief. So he asked for a sign. And he was given one!


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-1.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

18. Whereby shall I know?—This bold putting the angel to the proof was a want of proper faith. The fact that the angelic visitant knew his prayer, the splendour of his person, and the tremor of Zacharias, were vouchers sufficient. Strauss notes that Zacharias’s Greek words here are precisely the same with the Greek words of Abraham, according to the Septuagint in Genesis 15:8, and asks why Abraham was gratified and Zacharias punished. Grotius had answered Strauss’s question centuries before it was asked. Abraham had been instructed by no previous example; Zacharias was instructed by the example of Abraham, which as a priest he was bound to understand. But Zacharias’s penalty, like his fault, was slight. It was discipline rather than punishment. And Grotius, literal as is his spirit, finds in the dumbness and beckoning of Zacharias a type of the then existing silence of prophecy, leaving the nation to the premonitions of the rites and ceremonies alone until the Messiah be born.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-1.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 1:18. Whereby shall I know this? What is the sign according to which I may know this. Comp. Abraham’s question, Genesis 15:8, but notice that in Abraham’s case faith was strong (Genesis 15:6; Romans 4:19), while here the unbelief of Zacharias appears in the sign given him and in what follows: For I am an old man. Levites could serve up to the age of fifty years (Numbers 4:3; Numbers 8:24); but there was no such limitation in the case of priests.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-1.html. 1879-90.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Whereby shall I know this? Zacharias could not question the Divine Power, but he doubted of what the angel told him. (Witham) --- It was customary with the Jews, when they heard that any wonderful event was to take place, to inquire whether the Almighty had manifested his will by any supernatural sign. Zacharias puts this question to the angel, not through any doubt concerning the omnipotence of God, but because what was promised could not be compassed in the natural order of things: for, I am an old man and my wife is advanced in years. (Dionysius)


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Whereby = According to (Greek. kata, as in Luke 1:9) what [sign].

know = get to know. Greek. ginosko. App-182.

for I am an old man. To Zechariah the promise seemed to come too late; to Mary (Luke 1:34)too early.


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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Zacharias said unto the angel, Whereby shall I know this? for I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years.

And Zacharias said unto the angel, Whereby [ kata (G2596) ti (G5101)] shall I know this? for I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years. Had such a promise never been made and fulfilled before, the unbelief of Zacharias would have been more easily accounted for, and less sinful. But when the like promise was made to Abraham, at a more advanced age, "he staggered not at the promise of God through unbelief, but was strong in faith, giving glory to God" (Romans 4:20). "Through faith Sara herself also received strength to conceive seed, and was delivered of a child when she was past age, because she judged Him faithful who had promised" (Hebrews 11:11). As God is glorified by implicit confidence in His promises-and just in proportion to the natural obstacles in the way of fulfillment-so unbelief like that of Zacharias here is regarded as a dishonour put upon His word, and resented accordingly.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

How shall I know? He wanted a miraculous sign.


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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Zacharias said unto the angel, Whereby shall I know this? for I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years.
Whereby
34; Genesis 15:8; 17:17; 18:12; Judges 6:36-40; Isaiah 38:22
for
7; Numbers 11:21-23; 2 Kings 7:2; Romans 4:19

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 1:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-1.html.

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