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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 1:19

The angel answered and said to him, "I am Gabriel, who stands in the presence of God, and I have been sent to speak to you and to bring you this good news.

Adam Clarke Commentary

I am Gabriel - This angel is mentioned, Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21. The original גבריאל is exceedingly expressive: it is compounded of גבורה geburah, and אל el, the might of the strong God. An angel with such a name was exceedingly proper for the occasion; as it pointed out that all-prevalent power by which the strong God could accomplish every purpose, and subdue all things to himself.

That stand in the presence of God - This is in allusion to the case of the prime minister of an eastern monarch, who alone has access to his master at all times; and is therefore said, in the eastern phrase, to see the presence, or to be in the presence. From the allusion we may conceive the angel Gabriel to be in a state of high favor and trust before God.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I am Gabriel - The word “Gabriel” is made up of two Hebrew words, and signifies “man of God.” This angel is mentioned as having been deputed to inform “Daniel” that his prayers were heard. See the notes at Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21.

That stand in the presence of God - To stand in the presence of one is a phrase denoting “honor” or “favor.” To be admitted to the presence of a king, or to be with him, was a token of favor. So to stand before God signifies merely that he was honored or favored by God. He was permitted to come near him, and to see much of his glory. Compare 1 Kings 10:8; 1 Kings 12:6; 1 Kings 17:1; Proverbs 22:29.

And am sent … - The angels are “ministering spirits” sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation,” Hebrews 1:7, Hebrews 1:14. They delight to do the will of God, and one way of doing that will is by aiding his children here, by succoring the afflicted, and by defending those who are in danger. There is no more absurdity or impropriety in supposing that angels may render such aid, than there is in supposing that good people may assist one another; and there can be no doubt that it affords high pleasure to the angels of God to be “permitted” to aid those who are treading the dangerous and trying path which leads to eternity. Holiness is the same as benevolence, and holy beings seek and love opportunities to do good to their fellow creatures. In the eye of holy beings all God‘s creatures are parts of one great family, and whenever they can do them good they rejoice in the opportunity, at any sacrifice.

These glad tidings - This good news respecting the birth of a son.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-1.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And the angel answering said unto him, I am Gabriel, that stand in the presence of God; and I was sent to speak unto thee, and to bring thee these good tidings.

I am Gabriel ... Only two angels are named in the canonical Scriptures, the other being Michael (Daniel 10:21; Jude 1:1:9). There are seven such archangels who stand before God's throne (Revelation 8:2). "There seems to be a remarkable gradation in the words (of this verse) enhancing the guilt of Zacharias' unbelief."[18] The thought appears to be: I am Gabriel a holy angel, yes, one of the highest angels, and I have been specifically commissioned by God to bring you this good news!

ENDNOTE:

[18] John Wesley, One Volume Commentary (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Book House, 1972), en loco.


Copyright Statement
James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And the angel answering, said unto him, I am Gabriel,.... The name of an angel well known to Zacharias from Daniel's prophecies, Daniel 8:16 and is the first time we read of the name of an angel: the Jews sayF1T. Hicros. Rosh Hashana, fol. 56. 4. , the names of angels came out of Babylon, by the means of the Israelites; and it was there that Daniel became acquainted with this name of Gabriel, and also of Michael. Frequent mention is made of Gabriel in the Jewish writingsF2Targum Jon. in Exod. xxiv. 10. Targum in Esth. iv. 12. & in Psal. cxxxvii. 8. T. Bab. Sanhedrin, fol. 19. 2. Shemot Rabba, fol. 91. 2. Sithre Toro in Zohar in Gen. fol. 65. 3. & 66. 2. : were there a particular angel appointed over conception, as the Jews sayF3Targum in Job. iii. 3. there is, one would be ready to think it should be Gabriel, since he was sent to declare the conception and birth both of John the Baptist, and of our Lord Jesus Christ: the name of that angel the Jews indeed sayF4T. Bab. Nidda, fol. 16. 2. is Lilah; but yet the Cabalistic doctorsF5Lex. Cabbal. p. 230. affirm, that that angel is under Gabriel. In what language this angel spoke to Zacharias, and afterwards to Mary, may be a needless inquiry; but since the Syriac language was generally spoken, and understood by the Jews at this time, it is highly reasonable that he spoke to them in that. The Jews have a notion, that none of the ministering angels understand the Syriac language, excepting Gabriel; and he, they say, understood seventy languagesF6T. Bab. Sota, fol. 33. 1. & Tosephot in Sabbat, fol. 12. 2. . Now the angel, by making mention of his name, puts Zacharias in mind of the prophecy of Daniel concerning the coming of the Messiah, which he had from him; and whereas his name signified, "a man of God", or "the power", or "strength of God", or "God is my strength", he suggests unto him, that he ought not to have distrusted his Words, since with God all things are possible: he adds,

that stand in the presence of God; beholding his face, hearkening to his voice, and ministering to him, and so had this affair immediately from him: and therefore he had no reason to doubt of the accomplishment of it. Gabriel, according to the Jews, is one of the four angels that surround the throne of God: their names are Michael, Uriel, Raphael, and GabrielF7Bernidbar Rabba, sect. 2. fol. 179. 1. ,

"Michael they place at his right hand, and Uriel at his left hand, and Gabriel, מלפניו, before him, (in his presence, as he here says of himself,) over against the kingdom of Judah, and Moses and Aaron, who were in the east (of the camp of Israel); and why is his name called Gabriel? of Judah it is written, 1 Chronicles 5:2 "for Judah", גבר, "prevailed above his brethren"; and of Moses it is written, Leviticus 1:1 "and God called unto Moses"; and it is written, Isaiah 9:6 "and shall call his name Wonderful, Counselor, אל גבור the mighty God, lo! Gabriel".

And am sent to speak unto thee, and to show unto thee these glad tidings: wherefore, on account of his name, his office, and his mission, especially the subject of it being welcome news, good tidings, what he said ought to have obtained credit with him. Gabriel was one of the ministering spirits sent to minister to them that were heirs of salvation; his messages were messages of mercy, grace and love; he was not a minister of the wrath and vengeance of God, but of his favour. Agreeably to this the Jews say of him, that his name Gabriel is, by "gematry", or numerically, the same with רחם "merciful"F8Lex. Cabbal. p. 230. : he is called, in the TalmudF9T. Bab. Sanhedrin, fol. 44. 2. , רוח פסקונית "the decisive spirit", and is said to have three names, Piskon, Itmon, and Sigron. He is called Piskon, because he decides, or determines judgment against them that are above; and Itmon, because he stops up the sins of the Israelites; and Sigron, because when he shuts (the gates of judgment) there is none can open again. Hence also they say, that he is the angel that is appointed over water which quenches fire. The Targumist on Job 25:2 paraphrases the words thus:

"Michael on the right hand, who is over fire; and Gabriel on the left hand, who is over water; and the holy creatures mingle fire and water, and by his dominion and fear, make peace in his heaven of heavens.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And the angel answering said unto him, I am Gabriel, x that stand in the presence of God; and am sent to speak unto thee, and to shew thee these glad tidings.

(x) That appears, for so the Hebrews use this saying "to stand" to mean that they are ready to do his commandment.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-1.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Gabriel — signifying “man of God,” the same who appeared to Daniel at the time of incense (Daniel 9:21) and to Mary (Luke 1:26).

stand, etc. — as his attendant (compare 1 Kings 17:1).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

I am Gabriel, that stand in the presence of God. The word of such a messenger was sign enough. He is named also in Daniel 8:15-18. Seven angels "stand before God" (Revelation 8:2).


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-1.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Gabriel (ΓαβριηλGabriēl). The Man of God (Daniel 8:6; Daniel 9:21). The other angel whose name is given in Scripture is Michael (Daniel 10:13, Daniel 10:21; Judges 1:9; Revelation 12:7). The description of himself is a rebuke to the doubt of Zacharias.


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Gabriel

Meaning man of God. In Jewish tradition the guardian of the sacred treasury. Michael (see on Judges 1:9) is the destroyer, the champion of God against evil, the minister of wrath. Gabriel is the messenger of peace and restoration. See Daniel 8:16, Daniel 9:21. “The former is the forerunner of Jehovah the Judge; the latter of Jehovah the Saviour” (Godet).


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And the angel answering said unto him, I am Gabriel, that stand in the presence of God; and am sent to speak unto thee, and to shew thee these glad tidings.

I am Gabriel, that stand in the presence of God — Seven angels thus stand before God, Revelation 7:2; who seem the highest of all. There seems to be a remarkable gradation in the words, enhancing the guilt of Zacharias's unbelief. As if he had said, I am Gabriel, a holy angel of God: yea, one of the highest order. Not only so, but am now peculiarly sent from God; and that with a message to thee in particular. Nay, and to show thee glad tidings, such as ought to be received with the greatest joy and readiness.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-1.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And the angel answering said unto him, I am Gabriel1, that stand in the presence of God2; and I was sent to speak unto thee, and to bring thee these good tidings3.

  1. I am Gabriel. This name means "hero, or mighty one, of God". Gabriel announced to Daniel the time of Christ's birth and death (Daniel 9:21,25,26) and the overthrow and final restoration of the Jewish nation (Daniel 8:16,23-25). He also announced the birth of Jesus to Mary (Luke 1:26). The Bible gives the name of but one other angel; viz., Michael (Daniel 10:13,21; Daniel 12:1; Jude 1:9; Revelation 12:7), meaning "Who is like God"? Since Gabriel was the messenger who announced God's merciful and gracious purposes, and Michael the one who executed his decrees and punishments, the Jews had a beautiful saying that "Gabriel flew with two wings, and Michael with only one". The very ancient book of Enoch gives us the name of two other archangels; viz., Uriel, meaning "God is light"; and Raphael, meaning "healer of God". See

  2. That stand in the presence of God. Seven angels are spoken of as standing in the presence of God (Revelation 8:2) and may probably be called "angels of the presence" (Isaiah 63:9). But to see the face of God is no doubt accorded to all angels (Matthew 18:10). One who stands in the presence of God should be believed by men without approving signs.

  3. These good tidings. Our word "gospel" means good tidings.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-1.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

The name Gabriel is mentioned in Daniel 8:16,9:21.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-1.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

19.I am Gabriel By these words the angel intimates that it was not his veracity, but that of God who sent him, and whose message he brought, that had been questioned; and so he charges Zacharias with having offered an insult to God. To stand before God signifies to be ready to yield obedience. It implies that he is not a mortal man, but a heavenly spirits — that he did not fly hither at random, but, as became a servant of God, had faithfully performed his duty: and hence it follows that God, the author of the promise, had been treated with indignity and contempt in the person of his ambassador. Of similar import is the declaration of Christ, “he that despiseth you despiseth me; and he that despiseth me despiseth him that sent me,” (Luke 10:16.) Although the preaching of the gospel is not brought to us from heaven by angels, yet, since God attested by so many miracles that he was its author, and since Christ, the Prince and Lord of angels, once published it with his own mouth, (Hebrews 1:2,) that he might give it a perpetual sanction, its majesty ought to make as deep an impression upon us, as if all the angels were heard loudly proclaiming its attestation from heaven. Nay, the apostle, in the Epistle to the Hebrews, not satisfied with elevating the word of the gospel, which speaks by the mouth of men, to an equality with the law brought by angels, draws an argument from the less to the greater.

“If the word spoken by angels was stedfast, and every transgression and disobedience received a just recompence of rewards”
(
Hebrews 2:2,)

of how much sorer punishment, suppose ye, shall he be thought worthy, who hath trodden under foot the Son of God,”
(
Hebrews 10:29,)

whose “voice shakes not the earth only, but also heaven?” (Hebrews 12:26.) Let us learn to render to God the obedience of faith, which he values more highly than all sacrifices. Gabriel means the strength, or power, or pre-eminence of God, and this name is given to the angel on our account, to instruct us that we must not ascribe to angels any thing of their own, for whatever excellence they possess is from God. The Greek participle, παρεστηκὼς, (standing,) is in the past tense, but everybody knows that the past tense of such verbs is often taken for the present, and particularly when a continued act is expressed. The word εὐαγγελίσασθαι (to convey glad tidings) aggravates the crime of Zacharias; for he was ungrateful to God, who kindly promised a joyful and desirable event.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-1.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

angel

(See Scofield "Hebrews 1:4")


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Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 1:19". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-1.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

19 And the angel answering said unto him, I am Gabriel, that stand in the presence of God; and am sent to speak unto thee, and to shew thee these glad tidings.

Ver. 19. That stand in the presence of God] Ut apparitor, ab apparendo, ready pressed to any service.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 1:19. I am Gabriel, that stand, &c.— As much as to say, "I am the angel Gabriel, the same servant of God (so the name signifies, being by interpretation vir Dei,—a man or servant of God) who, as the Scripture informs thee, appeared anciently to the prophet Daniel, with a message concerning the Messiah. (See Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21.) The truth of this thou mayest know from the place where I now stand, and from the time at which I appear to thee; for I am now in the presence of God, even in his sanctuary, where no evil spirit, pretending a commission from him, can possibly enter. I, who now stand in the presence of God, am Gabriel (for so the words may be rendered). Moreover, I am not come of myself, but I am sent of God, to tell thee the glad tidings of the near accomplishment of the things which I long ago shewed to Daniel at a great distance. Thou therefore, whose advanced age ought to have been venerable by an advanced knowledge of divine things, as well as by a strong faith in the power of God, art much to blame for calling in question the truth of my message; especially as by the prophesies of Daniel thou mightst have understood that this is the period determined for the coming of the Messiah, and his forerunner."


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-1.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

19.] γαβριήλ = נַּבִרִיאֵל, Man of God: see Daniel 8:16 ; Daniel 9:21, also Tobit 12:15.

The names of the angels, say the Rabbis, came up with Israel from Babylon. We first read of both Michael and Gabriel in the book of Daniel. But we are not therefore to suppose that they were borrowed from any heathen system, as Strauss and the rationalists have done; the fact being, that the persons and order of the angels were known long before, and their names formed matter of subsequent revelation to Daniel: see Professor Mill’s Vindication of Luke , 1, § 4, and note A also Joshua 5:13-15.

ὁ παρεστ. ἐν. τ. θ., one of the chief angels near the throne of God. They are called seven in Tobit (ibid.): see Dr. Mill’s Tract, as above.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-1.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 1:19. γαβριὴλ, Gabriel) The reason why Zacharias ought not to have had any unbelief, is the authority of the heavenly messenger. The name is compounded of גבר and אל, and indicates the main object of his embassy, viz. concerning the incarnation of the Son of God, אל is גבר, God is man. Gabriel had appeared to Daniel also. It was the same angel, and he came on the same business.— παρεστηκὼς, who am wont to stand in attendance) Seven angels stand in the presence of God, Revelation 8:2. One of these, Gabriel, stands in attendance [adstat, stands by], or stands with the six others.— ἀπεστάλην, I have been sent) Luke 1:26; Hebrews 1:14.— εὐαγγελίσασθαι, to show thee these glad tidings) Thus marking the beginning of the Gospel [= Glad tidings]: ch. Luke 2:10; Luke 2:17, Luke 3:18; Mark 1:1.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 19,20. It is by some observed, that before the captivity of Babylon we read of no name of any angel, who have no names as we have, but assume names to declare the nature of their ministration; and that Gabriel signifieth, the power, or the strength, of God, because the declaring of the gospel, which the apostle declares the power of God to salvation, Romans 1:16, seemeth to have been his peculiar ministration. We read of this Gabriel, Daniel 8:16 9:21, where we find him foretelling the Messias, and the working of man’s redemption; to which prophecies he doubtless refers Zacharias in saying,

I am Gabriel. We again shall meet with him Luke 1:26,27, six months after this, appearing to the virgin Mary, and telling her she should bring forth the Messiah. He addeth,

that stand in the presence of God. As the good angels always behold the presence of our heavenly Father, (as our Saviour tells us), and are ready to be sent about his messages, (whence is the name of angels), they are called God’s ministers, Psalms 103:21 104:4.

And am sent to speak unto thee, and to show thee these glad tidings: God sent me on purpose to declare this thing to thee. Which Zacharias might have known by the time and place when he appeared; at the time of prayer, at the altar in the holy place, where the evil angels used not to show themselves.

And, behold, thou shalt be dumb, and not able to speak, until the day that these things shall be performed. Divines have perplexed themselves to give a just account of this signal punishment of so good a man; whether they have said enough to satisfaction I cannot tell. Abraham, upon the same question, was gratified with a sign, Genesis 15:8,9; so was Gideon, Jude 6:17. Where there is no difference in the words, or in a fact, there may be a great difference in the heart, and its inward habit and motions, from which those words proceed, and we must allow God to see that better than we can discern it by the words. Before Abraham’s time, we read of no such experience of God’s power in such cases, neither do we find that Abraham desired a sign as to this, that God would give him a child, but only as to the Lord’s giving his posterity Canaan. Besides that, it is said, Luke 1:6, he believed, and it was counted to him for righteousness; and the apostle extols his faith, Romans 4:19-21: Being not weak in faith, he considered not his own body now dead, when he was about an hundred years old, neither the deadness of Sarah’s womb: he staggered not at the promise through unbelief; but was strong in faith, giving glory to God; being fully persuaded that, what he had promised, he was able to perform. So as he asked not a sign for the begetting of a faith in him, he believed the Lord without a sight, only, fearing his own heart, he asked a sign for the further increase and confirmation of his faith. Besides, Zacharias’s punishment was gentle, and of that nature that it also carried with it an answer to his desire: it was only the privation of speech, until the words of the angel should be fulfilled.

Because thou believest not my words. The words of God by his messengers are to be believed, and the not believing their words, which they speak truly from him, and as so sent, is a sin God will severely punish. It is all one not to believe God, as not to believe those whom he sends, speaking what he bids them.

Which shall be fulfilled in their season. The unbelief of men shall not make the word and promise of God of no effect; but God’s promises have their seasons, before which we must not expect the accomplishment of them, Habakkuk 2:3.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 1:19". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-1.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Gabriel; this is composed of two Hebrew words, which mean, God’s strong one, or man of God; and is the name of the angel or messenger sent to Daniel to make known to him things concerning the Messiah. Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-1.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

19. ἀποκριθείς. This aor. pass. part. is constantly used in the N. T. for the aor. mid. part. ἀποκρινάμενος. Veitch, Greek Verbs, p. 78, says that the earliest instance of this use is in Maco, a poet of the later comedy. In Hellenistic Greek the force of the middle voice is to some extent obliterated.

Γαβριήλ. Vir dei. The name means ‘Hero of God.’ He is also mentioned in Luke 1:26, and in Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21-23 (“idem Angelus, idem negotium,” Bengel). The only other Angel or Archangel (1 Thessalonians 4:16; Judges 1:9) named in Scripture is Michael (‘Who is like God?’ Daniel 10:21). In the Book of Enoch we read of ‘the four great Archangels (Sarîm or Princes) Michael, Uriel, Raphael, Gabriel,’ and so too in Pirke Rabbi Eliezer, IV. In Tobit 12:15, “I am Raphael (one whom God heals), one of the seven holy Angels which present the prayers of the saints, and which go in and out before the glory of the Holy One.” Since Michael was despatched on messages of wrath and Gabriel on messages of mercy, the Jews had the beautiful saying that “Gabriel flew with two wings, but Michael with only one.”

ὁ παρεστηκὼς ἐνώπιον τοῦ θεοῦ, καὶ ἀπεστάλην λαλῆσαι πρὸς σὲ. He was thus one of the “Angels of the Presence” (Isaiah 63:9; cf. Matthew 18:10).

“One of the Seven

Who in God’s presence, nearest to His throne,

Stand ready at command, and are His eyes

That run through all the heavens, and down to the earth

Bear His swift errands over moist and dry,

O’er sea and land.”

MILTON, Paradise Lost, III. 650.

See Revelation 8:2; Daniel 7:10; 1 Kings 22:19. The supposed resemblance to the Amshaspands in the Zendavesta is shewn by Dr Mill to be purely superficial. Mythical Interpretation, p. 127.

εὐαγγελίσασθαί σοι ταῦτα. The word εὐαγγελίσασθαι, ‘to preach the Gospel,’ is common in St Luke and St Paul, but elsewhere is not often found. It comes from the LXX[30] (Isaiah 40:9; Isaiah 61:1). In the R. V[31] it is rendered “to bring thee these good tidings,” and εὐαγγέλιον is “good,” rather than “glad tidings.” It would be an anachronism here to render it by “preach the Gospel.”


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-1.html. 1896.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And the angel answering said to him, “I am Gabriel, who stands in the presence of God, and I was sent to speak to you, and to bring you these good tidings.” ’

The answer comes. He can know that a son will be born to him because of the authority and position of the one who speaks. ‘I AM Gabriel, who stands in the presence of God.’ The ‘I am’ is emphatic. Could such a one lie? For one who stands in the presence of God could not come with lying promises. What he promises is directly from God. And he had been sent specifically to bring him these good tidings.

Gabriel (Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21) is one of two angels whose names are given in the Bible. His name means ‘man of God’. The other was Michael (Daniel 10:13; Daniel 10:21; Daniel 12:1). These two therefore are supreme among angels. (He stands before God). But in Daniel also it was Gabriel, as the angel of mercy, who came as God’s messenger. Michael was more the defender of God’s people. To ‘stand in the presence of God’ is to be a close attendant, one in close service, ever ready to do His will.

The Jews believed in seven ‘angels of the presence’, among whom they named Gabriel and Michael, but while they gave them names no others are mentioned in Scripture, apart possibly from in Revelation 1:4; Revelation 4:5. (Raphael is mentioned in the Apocrypha, but the Apocrypha was never accepted by the Jews as Scripture).

‘Good tidings.’ This was a word intimately connected with the Isaianic promises concerning the Messiah, the Servant, and the Prophet, the Coming One (Isaiah 40:9; Isaiah 52:7; Isaiah 60:6; Isaiah 61:1 compare Luke 2:10).


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-1.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

19. Gabriel—See note on Matthew 1:20.

In the presence of God—See note on Matthew 18:10.

Shalt be dumb—Literally, shalt be silent. The word rendered speechless in Luke 1:22, signifies both deaf and dumb. As his ear had refused the angel’s message, he shall be rendered deaf; and as he had uttered a bold and faithless speech, so a divine silence shall reprove him. Well for us often might it be, if some such gentle admonitory judgment should check our loquacity and teach us a wise silence. Zacharias’s punishment shall have a side of blessing to it. It shall be a sign to him that God will be better than his faith; a sign to others that the hope of Israel is drawing nigh. Similarly, by supernatural interviews, Jacob was made lame, and Saul of Tarsus was struck blind. These were the severe side of a gracious visitation. They remind us that we are sinners, even when we receive the tokens of God’s favour. And they tell us what we deserve in spite of the blessings that we get.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-1.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 1:19. I am Gabriel; comp. Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21. ‘Man of God.’

That stand in the presence of God. One of the chief angels (archangels) nearest to God. According to Tob_12:15, there were seven such. Comp. Revelation 8:2. The Rabbins say, that the names of the angels were brought from Babylon by the Jews, but this does not prove that the belief in them, or in their rank, was derived from heathenism. Comp. Joshua 5:13-15. The name was known to Zacharias from the book of Daniel, and is announced by Gabriel to assert his authority.

To bring thee these glad tidings. The message was a gospel message.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-1.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 1:19. ἀποκριθεὶς: the very natural scepticism of Zechariah is treated as a fault.— γαβριὴλ: the naming of angels is characteristic of the later stage of Judaism (vide Daniel 8:16; Daniel 10:21).


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-1.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

The name Gabriel signifies, the strength of God; or, God is my strength. The angels are sometimes styled by proper names, in order to shew their respective duties; thus, no angel could better be appointed to declare the precursor, as also the Messias himself, than he who was styled the power of God: since he came to declare the coming of one who was to destroy the power of the devil, and overthrow his kingdom. (Nicholas of Lyra) See Tobit xii. 15; Apocalypse i. 4. and viii. 2.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

answering said. See note on Deuteronomy 1:41.

Gabriel = the mighty man of God. The messanger of the restoration (Luke 1:26; Daniel 8:16; Daniel 9:21), as Michael is the messanger of Israel"s delieverance from judgement (Daniel 10:13, Daniel 10:21; Daniel 12:1. Jude 1:9; and Revelation 12:7). Probably two of the seven angels of Revelation 1:4; Revelation 3:1; Revelation 4:5; Revelation 5:6; Revelation 8:2, Revelation 8:6; Revelation 15:1, Revelation 15:6, Revelation 15:7, Revelation 15:8; Revelation 16:1; Revelation 17:1; Revelation 21:9.

in the presence. Same as "before", Luke 1:6.

am = was

shew = announce.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And the angel answering said unto him, I am Gabriel, that stand in the presence of God; and am sent to speak unto thee, and to shew thee these glad tidings.

And the angel answering said unto him, I am Gabriel - `man of God' [ Gaabriy'eel (Hebrew #1403)]. He appeared to Daniel, and at the same time of incense (Daniel 9:21); to Mary also he was sent (Luke 1:26).

That stand in the presence of God [as His attendant (cf. 1 Kings 17:1)] and am sent to speak unto thee, and to show thee these glad tidings.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

I am Gabriel. The word of an angel was sign enough! I stand in the presence of God. See Revelation 8:2; Daniel 8:15-18; Hebrews 1:14.


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(19) I am Gabriel.—No names of angels appear in the Old Testament till after the Babylonian Exile. Then we have Gabriel (= “the strong one—or the hero—of God”), in Daniel 8:16; Michael (= “who is like unto God?”), in Daniel 10:21; Daniel 12:1; Raphael (= “the healer of God”—i.e., the divine healer), in Tobit 12:15, as one of the seven holy angels which present the prayers of the saints. As having appeared in the prophecies which, more than any others, were the germ of the Messianic expectations which the people cherished, there was a fitness in the mission now given to Gabriel to prepare the way for the Messiah’s coming.

That stand in the presence of God.—The imagery was drawn from the customs of an Eastern Court, in which those stood who were the most honoured ministers of the king, while others fell prostrate in silent homage. (Comp. the “angel of His presence “in Isaiah 63:9, with our Lord’s language as to the angels that “behold the face” of His Father, Matthew 18:10.)

To shew thee these glad tidings.—Literally, to evangelise. The word is memorable as the first utterance, as far as the Gospel records are concerned, of that which was to be the watchword of the kingdom. It was not, however, a new word, and its employment here was, in part at least, determined by Isaiah’s use of it (Isaiah 40:9; Isaiah 61:1).


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And the angel answering said unto him, I am Gabriel, that stand in the presence of God; and am sent to speak unto thee, and to shew thee these glad tidings.
I am
26; Daniel 8:16; 9:21-23; Matthew 18:10; Hebrews 4:14
and to
2:10

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 1:19". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-1.html.

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