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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 1:20

"And behold, you shall be silent and unable to speak until the day when these things take place, because you did not believe my words, which will be fulfilled in their proper time."

Adam Clarke Commentary

Thou shalt be dumb - Σιωπων silent; this translation is literal; the angel immediately explains it, thou shalt not be able to speak. Dumbness ordinarily proceeds from a natural imperfection or debility of the organs of speech; in this case there was no natural weakness or unfitness in those organs; but, for his rash and unbelieving speech, silence is imposed upon him by the Lord, and he shall not be able to break it, till the power that has silenced him gives him again the permission to speak! Let those who are intemperate in the use of their tongues behold here the severity and mercy of the Lord; nine months' silence for one intemperate speech! Many, by giving way to the language of unbelief, have lost the language of praise and thanksgiving for months, if not years!


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Because thou believest not … - This was both a sign and a judgment - a sign that he had come from God, and that the thing would be fulfilled: and a judgment for not giving credit to what he had said. There is no sin in the sight of God more aggravated than unbelief. When God speaks; man should believe; nor can he that “will not” believe escape punishment. God speaks only truth, and we should believe Him. God speaks only what is for our good, and it is right that we should suffer if we do not credit what He says.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-1.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And behold, thou shalt be silent and not able to speak, until the day that these things shall come to pass, because thou believest not my words, which shall be fulfilled in their season.

Thou shalt be silent ... This punishing rebuke was appropriate. Since Zacharias had not believed God's word as delivered by Gabriel, his own words were cut off until the time appointed. From Luke 1:62, it is certain that Zacharias also lost his hearing at the same time. Implicit in this episode is the injunction that men should believe God's words, even when they are delivered by one of God's messengers.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And behold, thou shalt be dumb, &c. Or "silent; and not able to speak", if he would. Silence is sometimes voluntary; but this was what he could not help;

until the day that these thing shall be performed; which he had said concerning the conception and birth of a son, and the imposition of a name on him; for this dumbness remained upon Zachariah, not only until his wife had conceived, and the child was born, but until the eighth day after, when he was circumcised, and his name was given him the angel directed to: "because thou believest not my words": he was struck both deaf and dumb, as appears from his friends making signs to him, Luke 1:62 which they had no need to have done, could he have heard: he was struck with deafness, because he hearkened not to the angel's words; and with dumbness, because from the unbelief of his heart he objected to them. We learn from hence, what an evil unbelief is, and how much resented by God, and how much it becomes us to take heed, that it prevails not in us: and especially since it easily besets us: "which shall be fulfilled in their season"; first the conception, then the birth; after that the calling him by his name, and in process of time, the doing of his work and office; so that the unbelief Zacharias did not make the faith of God of none effect; for though sometimes the people of God are very unbelieving, yet he abides faithful to his word and promises. Mahomet, in his AlkoranF11C. 3. p. 40. Ed. Sale. , very wrongly makes the angel to say these words to Zacharias,

"thy sign shall be, that thou shalt speak unto no man for three days, otherwise than by gesture.

And elsewhereF12C. 10. p. 249. it is said three nights,


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-1.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

dumb — speechless.

not able — deprived of the power of speech (Luke 1:64). He asked a sign, and now he got it.

until the day that these things shall be performed — See on Luke 1:64.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

Thou shalt be dumb. His power of speech taken away shall be a sign.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-1.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Thou shalt be silent (εσηι σιωπωνesēi siōpōn). Volitive future periphrastic.

Not able to speak (μη δυναμενος λαλησαιmē dunamenos lalēsai). Negative repetition of the same statement. His dumbness will continue “until” (αχρι ης ημεραςachri hēs hēmeras) the events come to pass “because” (αντ ωνanth' hōn). The words were to become reality in due season (καιρονkairon not χρονοςchronos time).


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Thou shalt be silent ( ἔσῃ σιωπῶν )

Lit., thou shalt be being silent. The finite verb and participle denote continuance.

Not able to speak

Showing that the silence would not be voluntary.

My words which ( οἵτινες )

The pronoun is qualitative, denoting a class. “My words, which, incredible as they seem to you, are of a kind which shall be fulfilled.

In their season ( εἰς τὸν καιρὸν )

The preposition implies exactness: at the completion of the appointed time. The process of fulfilment, beginning now, will go on, εἰς ,up to, the appointed time, and at the time will be consummated. Καιρὸν ,season, is more specific than χρόνος ,time. It is an a appointed, fitting time: the rightpoint of time when circumstances shall concur.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And, behold, thou shalt be dumb, and not able to speak, until the day that these things shall be performed, because thou believest not my words, which shall be fulfilled in their season.

Thou shalt be dumb — The Greek word signifies deaf, as well as dumb: and it seems plain, that he was as unable to hear, as he was to speak; for his friends were obliged to make signs to him, that he might understand them, Luke 1:62.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-1.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And behold, thou shalt be silent and not able to speak1, until the day that these things shall come to pass, because thou believedst not my words, which shall be fulfilled in their season.

  1. Thou shalt be silent and not able to speak. It was a sign; and also a punishment for having sought a sign.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-1.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Dumb; that is, deaf and dumb: the same words being used in this case as are employed to denote this class in other parts of the New Testament. Accordingly, in Luke 1:62,63, we see that his friends communicated with him by signs, implying that he could not hear.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-1.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

20.And, behold, thou shalt be dumb It was suitable that this kind of punishment should be inflicted on Zacharias, that, being dumb, he might await the fulfillment of the promise, which, instead of interrupting it by noisy murmurs, he ought to have heard in silence. Faith has its silence to lend an ear to the Word of God. It has afterwards its turn to speak and to answer Amen, according to that passage,

“I will say to them, Thou art my people, and they shall say,
Thou art my God,” (
Hosea 2:23.)

But as Zacharias had rashly interrupted the Word of God, he is not allowed this favor of breaking out immediately in thanksgiving, but is denied for a time the use of his tongue, which had been too forward. Yet God is pleased graciously to mitigate the punishment, first, by limiting its duration to ten months, and next by not withholding from Zacharias the favor which he was unworthy to enjoy. With the same gentleness does he treat us every day: for when our faith is weak, and we throw out many obstacles, the truth of God, in continuing to flow toward us, must of necessity break through them with a kind of violence. That is the angel’s meaning, when he reproaches Zacharias with unbelief, and yet declares that those things which Zacharias did not believe would be accomplished in due time And so Zacharias is not a little relieved by learning that his fault has not made void the promise of God, which will afterwards be displayed in a more remarkable manner. It does sometimes happen that, notwithstanding the opposition made by unbelievers, the Lord bestows and fulfils what he had promised to them. We have a remarkable instance of this in King Ahaz, who rejected the promised safety, and yet was delivered from his enemies, (Isaiah 7:12.) But that resulted, without any advantage to him, in the salvation of the chosen people. It was otherwise with Zacharias, in whom the Lord chastises, and at the same time pardons, the weakness of faith.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-1.html. 1840-57.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

DUMB, BECAUSE OF UNBELIEF

‘And, behold, thou shalt be dumb … because thou believest not my words.’

Luke 1:20

The threatened dumbness was to be a sign and a rebuke. God prevented Zacharias from speaking about that which, when presented to him, he had not believed. And this effect is common, although produced by different means. The fruit of unbelief is:—

I. Dumbness in prayer.—Not believing God’s words about prayer, we cease from it, or restrain it. If we believe God’s words we can pray. If we believe them cordially we can pray earnestly. If we believe them but feebly we pray faintly. If we do not believe them at all we cease from prayer. As faith declines, dumbness in prayer creeps over us.

II. Dumbness in praise.—Not believing God’s words we are dumb as to praise. Perplexity relaxes, loosens, and entangles the strings of our harp. Faith sets them free, tightens them, and tunes them, and faith brings forth triumphant music.

III. Dumb in testimony.—Not believing God’s words we are dumb as to our testimony to the truth. When a man speaks of that which he believes, an influence goes forth from himself which does not proceed from him when he gives a tract or a book, even though it be the Holy Book. We believe, and speak; we lose our faith, and are silent.

IV. Dumb in Christian intercourse.—Not believing God’s words we become dumb as to Christian intercourse and fellowship. ‘Then they that feared the Lord spake often one to another.’

If spiritual dumbness is produced by unbelief, it can be prevented and overcome by faith only.


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-1.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

20 And, behold, thou shalt be dumb, and not able to speak, until the day that these things shall be performed, because thou believest not my words, which shall be fulfilled in their season.

Ver. 20. And behold thou shall be dumb] His tongue that so lately moved through unbelief is now tied up. God will not pass by the wellmeant weaknesses of his own, without a sensible check. He was also deaf as well as dumb: hence they made signs to him, Luke 1:62.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-1.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 1:20

Unbelief and dumbness are as fountain and stream, cause and effect. It is written, observes Paul in his second letter to the Church at Corinth, "I believed, therefore have I spoken;" we also believe, and therefore speak. Faith opens the lips, unbelief closes them. There is a noisy unbelief as well as a dumb unbelief. But the loud unbelief is a general faithlessness in all Divine testimony; while the dumb unbelief is lack of faith in some particular word of God. We are speaking, not of the unbelief of the unbeliever, but of the unbelief of the believer.

I. Not believing God's word about prayer, we cease from it or restrain it. In the first instance, prayer was instinctive. If we believe God's words we can pray. If we believe them cordially, we can pray earnestly. If we believe them but feebly, we pray faintly. If we do not believe them at all, we cease from prayer; and it is most instructive and interesting to observe how, as faith declines, dumbness in prayer creeps over us. "Thou shalt be dumb, because thou believest not my words."

II. Not believing God's words, we are dumb as to praise. We require words of God to expound to us the acts and works of God. Perplexity relaxes, loosens, and entangles the strings of our harp. Faith sets them free, tightens them, tunes them; and faith brings forth triumphant music. We may think the silence of our harp, and the dumbness of our voice in praise, of but small moment, but God saith, "Whoso offereth praise glorifieth Me."

III. Not believing God's words, we are dumb as to our testimony to the truth. Truth is communicated and propagated by tradition; by men saying to each other, "Know the Lord," or, "Lo, here is Christ." When a man speaks of that which he believes, an influence goes forth from himself which does not proceed from him when he gives a tract or book, even though it be the Holy Book. "We believe and speak." We lose our faith and are silent.

IV. Not believing God's words we become dumb as to Christian intercourse and fellowship. "Then they that feared the Lord spake often one to another." We speak to the unbeliever to bear witness. Believers speak to one another for mutual edification and consolation, and in the degree of their faith they will speak wisely and well.

S. Martin, Comfort in Trouble, p. 78.


References: Luke 1:20.—Spurgeon, Three Hundred Outlines on the New Testament, p. 42. Luke 1:21.—Christian World Pulpit, vol. vi., p. 127.


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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-1.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 1:20. Thou shalt be dumb, and not able to speak, The affirmation of a thing joined with the denial of its contrary, is an idiom peculiar to the Jewish language, and is the strongest affirmation possible. The style of St. John is remarkable for the frequency of this idiom. See on Luke 1:22.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-1.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

20.] We must not consider this dumbness solely as a punishment; it was also a sign, as Zacharias had required. It is impossible for us to say what the degree of unbelief in Zacharias was, and therefore we can be no judges as to his being deserving of the punishment (against Strauss and the rationalists).

κ. μ. δυν. λαλ.] This is not a repetition, but an explanation of the ground and reason, of σιωπῶν.

ἄχρι ἧς ἡμέρας γέν. ταῦτα] ποῖα; ἡ γέννησις δηλαδή, καὶ ἡ κλῆσις τοῦ ὀνόματος. Euthym(7)

ἀνθʼ ὧν is not a Hebraism, but good Greek: see Passow, and Matthiæ, § 480.

οἵτινες not merely identifies, but classifies: “being, as they are, of that kind which …”


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-1.html. 1863-1878.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 1:20. ἰδοὺ, behold) as much as to say, by this thou shalt be made know. An appropriate sign is given to him who asked for a sign, though the sign given was not such as he would have desired.— σιωπῶν, silent) in the matter of fact [actually].— μὴ δυνάμενος λαλῆσαι, not able to speak) in the want of the ability to speak [physically]. Comp. [accordingly in his recovery both are specified] Luke 1:64, the mouth and the tongue. For the most part, those to whom a great revelation is vouchsafed, are wont to lose something of their natural power, without however real hurt to them. So Jacob was made lame; but his lameness proved, not a blemish, but a mark of honour to him: so Zacharias here was made dumb: Saul (Paul) was for a time deprived of sight. This dumbness of Zacharias at the same time acted as a spiritual medicine, lest he should too much pride himself on account of the prophecy as to the greatness of his son.— ἄχρι ἧς) Comp. Luke 1:64 [His mouth opened] with Luke 1:13 [Thou shalt call his name John], 63 [When the ‘things’ foretold were ‘performed,’ and Zacharias, ceasing from unbelief, wrote, “His name is John”]. [The day alluded to was the day of John’s circumcision, on which he received his name.—V. g.]— ἀνθ ̓ ὧν, because) Therefore it was, strictly speaking, a punishment.— οὐκ ἐπιστεύσας, thou hast not believed) He did not believe: on this account he was not able to speak.(6)πληρωθήσονται, shall be fulfilled) It is the event which chiefly produces faith.— εἰς τὸν καιρὸν αὐτῶν, at their own season) their proper season. Comp. at this time [will I come], Romans 9:9. 2 Kings 4:16.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-1.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 1:19"


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 1:20". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-1.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

20. ἰδού. The word is used to call attention to something notable or surprising, and is specially frequent in St Matthew and St Luke (הִנֵּה, Isaiah 7:14 ). It is often a mere lively form of transition.

σιωπῶν καὶ μὴ δυνάμενος λαλῆσαι. ‘Thou shall be silent’ (not ‘dumb,’ which would be κωφός). The μὴ is used to indicate the thought of his friends that he was unable to speak. St Luke similarly puts a participle with μὴ after an adjective in Acts 13:14, ἔσῃ τυφλὸς μὴ βλέπων. See a somewhat different explanation in Winer, p. 610, and the note on Luke 4:42. This positive and negative way of expressing the same thing is common, especially in Hebrew literature, 2 Samuel 14:5; Exodus 21:11; Isaiah 38:1; Lamentations 3:2, &c.; but it is also found in classic writers. Zacharias receives the sign for which he had unfaithfully asked (Matthew 12:38), but it comes in the form of a punishment. Comp. Daniel 10:15.

οἵτινες. The pronoun is qualitative, and gives the reason for the punishment. ‘Thou didst not believe my words, which are of such a kind that,’ &c.

εἰς τὸν καιρὸν αὐτῶν. “I will certainly return unto thee according to the time of life,” Genesis 18:10, i.e. after the usual nine months. Εἰς τὸν καιρὸν is a classical idiom by constructio praegnans for. ἐν τῷ καιρῷ. It means that the angel’s words shall await the due time for their accomplishment. Comp. εἰς τὸ μέλλον in Luke 13:9.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-1.html. 1896.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“And behold, you will be silent and not able to speak, until the day that these things will come about, because you did not believe my words, which will be fulfilled in their season.”

Because he had not believed Gabriel’s words, which Gabriel stressed would be fulfilled, Zacharias was to be struck dumb for some time (ese siopon). He was to be silent and not able to speak. In Scripture silence was the prelude to extraordinary events. Compare Revelation 8:1; Lamentations 3:26; Habakkuk 2:20; Zephaniah 1:7; Zechariah 2:13. It was a sign that God was about to work. Thus the very sign indicated the awesomeness of this moment.

The impression given is that he should have believed, for he had as examples of God’s ability to give a child in old age the examples of Sara (Genesis 21:1-2) and Hannah (1 Samuel 1:6; 1 Samuel 1:19), and he had been informed of it by an impeccable source. But instead he had doubted, and he could not be allowed to take his doubt out to the people. So God gave him a sign which would also be a sign to the people. God would use his weakness for good, for his dumbness would make an impression that his doubting words might not have, and his releasing from it will be an indication that a new prophet has been commissioned. It was thus not just a punishment. It was a chastening with a purpose. Compare Ezekiel 3:26-27. In Ezekiel’s case his dumbness was a sign that God had nothing further to say to the people. And his mouth was opened when his ministry could begin again. Thus if they saw Zecharias’ dumbness as indicating that God had at present nothing to say to them it might make the people think more carefully about their position before God in a way that Zacharias’ doubting words might not. His dumbness thus indicated the final days of silence before the new prophet was born.


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Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-1.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 1:20. Thou shalt be silent. The next clause tells why.

And not able to speak. ‘Dumb’ (E. V.) seems equivalent to ‘not able to speak;’ but the effect is mentioned first, then the cause. This dumbness was miraculous.

Because thou didst not believe. The sign was also a punishment, and a deserved one. Abraham and Sarah went unpunished in a similar case. But Abraham had faith, and Sarah’s subsequent troubles may have been punitive. As the coming of the Messiah drew nigh, the demand for faith was greater; the great condition of the new covenant was thus emphasized. The punishment doubtless became a healing medicine for the soul of Zacharias, thus constrained to silent reflection.

Which shall be, etc. An assertion of the truthfulness of angelic messages in general, and a justification of the punishment of the priest’s unbelief when an angel spoke to him in the holy place.


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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-1.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 1:20. σιωπῶν καὶ μὴ δ. λ., silent and not able to speak; a temporary dumbness the sign asked, a slight penalty; not arbitrary, however, rather the almost natural effect of his state of mind—a kind of prolonged stupefaction resulting from a promise too great to be believed, yet pointing to a boon passionately desired.— ἀνθʼ ὧν: a phrase of Lk. = תַּחַת אֲשֶׁר, because. (Also in 2 Thessalonians 2:10.)


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-1.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

account of the many signs the angel had given, that what he said was true, the unbelief of Zacharias seemed inexcusable; for the angel appeared in a holy place, in the temple, and during divine service: he, moreover, foretold what related to the redemption of all the people, and to the glory of God; from all which circumstances, Zacharias ought to have concluded, that it was a good angel, and that what he said would eventually come to pass. (Nicholas of Lyra) --- Shalt be dumb, &c. He seems to have been both dumb and deaf by the Greek text, and by what we may learn from ver. 62; where we find, that those who were present did not speak, but rather made signs to him. (Witham)


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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-1.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

behold. Figure of speech Asterismos. App-6.

thou shalt be dumb. The finite Verb and Participle denote continuous silence.

be performed = come to pass.

believest not = didst not believe. App-150. Note the Negative.

not. Greek. ou. App-105.

which = which are of a kind which. Greek. hoitines, denoting a class, or kind of words.

in = up to. Greek eis. App-104. Marking the process continuing up to the end.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And, behold, thou shalt be dumb, and not able to speak, until the day that these things shall be performed, because thou believest not my words, which shall be fulfilled in their season.

And, behold, thou shalt be dumb [`speechless' sioopoon (G4623)] until the day that these things shall be performed, because thou believest not my words, which shall be fulfilled in their season. He asked for a sign, and now he got one.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(20) Behold, thou shalt be dumb.—The question was answered, the demand for a sign granted, but the demand had implied a want of faith, and therefore the sign took the form of a penalty. The vision and the words of the angel, harmonising as they did with all Zechariah’s previous convictions, ought to have been enough for him.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And, behold, thou shalt be dumb, and not able to speak, until the day that these things shall be performed, because thou believest not my words, which shall be fulfilled in their season.
thou shalt
22,62,63; Exodus 4:11; Ezekiel 3:26; 24:27
dumb
[siopao (siwpa/w)] silent; for in this case, though there was no natural imperfection or debility of the organs of speech, as in dumbness, yet, thou shalt not be able to speak. This was at once a proof of the severity and mercy of God: of severity, in condemning him to nine months' silence for his unbelief; of mercy, in rendering his punishment temporary, and the means of making others rejoice in the events predicted.
because
45; Genesis 18:10-15; Numbers 20:12; 2 Kings 7:2,19; Isaiah 7:9; Mark 9:19; 16:14; Revelation 3:19
which
Romans 3:3; 2 Timothy 2:13; Titus 1:2; Hebrews 6:18

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-1.html.

The Bible Study New Testament

You will remain silent. He would not be able to utter a sound.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 1:20". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

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