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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 1:26

Now in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God to a city in Galilee called Nazareth,

Adam Clarke Commentary

A city of Galilee - As Joseph and Mary were both of the family of David, the patrimonial estate of which lay in Bethlehem, it seems as if the family residence should have been in that city, and not in Nazareth; for we find that, even after the return from the captivity, the several families went to reside in those cities to which they originally belonged. See Nehemiah 11:3. But it is probable that the holy family removed to Galilee for fear of exciting the jealousy of Herod, who had usurped that throne to which they had an indisputable right. See on Luke 2:39; (note). Thus, by keeping out of the way, they avoided the effects of his jealousy.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

In the sixth month - The sixth month after Elizabeth‘s conception.

A city of Galilee named Nazareth - See the notes at Matthew 2:22-23.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-1.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

Now in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth.

ANNUNCIATION TO MARY

In the sixth month ... refers to the time since Elizabeth's conception (Luke 1:36). For note on "Gabriel," see under Luke 1:19.

Nazareth ... Luke's explanation that Nazareth was a city of Galilee indicates that many of his readers were Gentiles. No Jew would have needed to be told the location of Nazareth. No man could ever have imagined that an archangel would be commissioned by the God of all creation to visit a village such as Nazareth, situated in a district, the very name of which announced it as a place of the despised Gentiles. "GALILEE is a contraction of the region's full name, [~geliyl] [~ha-gowyim], which means "district of the pagans."[20] Many reasons have been suggested for God's choice of such a place for the residence of the divine Messiah, including the following: (1) Its Gentile character pointed to God's purpose of saving Gentiles. (2) Its insignificance suggested that no place where men live is beyond the Father's love and care. (3) The rural atmosphere provided an appropriate place for Jesus to develop into maturity. (4) By such a choice God signaled the reversal of human value judgments. (5) It enabled the fulfillment of the prophecy that Jesus should be called a Nazarene (Matthew 2:23). (6) It was less accessible to the curiosity and malignant hatred of powerful rulers than would have been the case with some large city.

ENDNOTE:

[20] Roland de Vaux, Everyday Life in Bible Times (Washington, D.C.: The National Geographic Society, 1967), p. 302.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And in the sixth month,.... After Elisabeth's conception; for so long was John the Baptist conceived before Christ, and so long he was born before him; and it seems as if there was the same distance between the public ministry of the one, and the other: John was before Christ, as man, being his forerunner; but Christ was preferred unto him as mediator, and existed before him, as the eternal Son of God:

the angel Gabriel was sent from God; the same angel, that near five hundred years before gave Daniel an exact account of the time of the Messiah's coming, and six months ago acquainted Zacharias with the conception, birth, character, and office of his forerunner:

unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth; the whole country of Galilee was mean and contemptible with the Jews: they observe, though through mistake, that no prophet arose out of it, John 7:52 and Nazareth particularly was exceeding despicable in their eye: hence those words of Nathanael, "can any good thing come out of Nazareth?" John 1:46 and yet hither an angel was sent by God; and here dwelt the mother of our Lord. See Gill on Matthew 1:23


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

3 And in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth,

(3) The angel, serving the Lord who would be born, is sent to the virgin Mary, in whom the son of the most high promised to David is conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-1.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Luke 1:26-38. Annunciation of Christ.

(See on Matthew 1:18-21).

sixth month — of Elisabeth‘s time.

Joseph, of the house of David — (See on Matthew 1:16).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

26. And in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth,

[The angel Gabriel.] "R. Simeon Ben Lachish saith, The names of angels went up by the hand of Israel out of Babylon. For before it is said, Then flew one of the seraphim unto me; the seraphim stood before him, Isaiah 6; but afterward the man Gabriel, [Dan 9:21] and Michael your prince," [Dan 10:21].

The angel calls Zacharias back to Daniel 9, where the prediction concerning the coming of Messiah was foretold by Gabriel.


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Bibliography
Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-1.html. 1675.

People's New Testament

Was sent to a city of Galilee. Nazareth, the home of Mary. Matthew (Matthew 1:20) gives an account of this visit, but does not give the angel's name.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-1.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Was sent (απεσταληapestalē). Second aorist passive indicative of αποστελλωapostellō from which apostle comes. The angel Gabriel is God‘s messenger to Mary as to Zacharias (Luke 1:19).


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-1.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Gabriel

The annunciation and the angel Gabriel are favorite themes with Dante, and he pictures them with exquisite beauty. Thus both appear on the sculptured wall which flanks the inner side of the purgatorial ascent.

“The angel who came down to earth with tidings

Of peace that had been wept for many a year,

And opened heaven from its long interdict,

In front of us appeared so truthfully

There sculptured in a gracious attitude,

He did not seem an image that is silent.

One would have sworn that he was saying Ave!

For she was there in effigy portrayed

Who turned the key to ope the exalted love,

And in her mien this language had impressed,

Ecce ancilla Dei! as distinctly

As any figure stamps itself in wax.”

Purgatory, x., 34-35

In Paradise Gabriel appears as a light circling round the Virgin and singing:

“I am angelic love, that circle round

The joy sublime which breathes out from the womb

That was the hostelry of our desire;

And I shall circle, Lady of heaven, while

Thou followest thy Son, and mak'st diviner

The sphere supreme, because thou enterest there.”

Paradise, xxiii., 103-108.

And again:

“And the same love that first descended then,

Ave Maria gratia plena singing,

In front of her his wings expanded wide.”

Paradise, xxxii., 94-96.


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-1.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth,

In the sixth month — After Elisabeth had conceived.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-1.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Now in the sixth month1 the angel Gabriel was sent from God2 unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth3,
    ANNUNCIATION OF THE BIRTH OF JESUS. (At Nazareth, B.C. 5.) Luke 1:26-38

  1. Now in the sixth month. This is the passage from which we learn that John was six months older than Jesus.

  2. The angel Gabriel was sent from God. See Luke 1:26-38.

  3. Unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth. Luke alone tells us where Mary lived before the birth of Jesus. That Nazareth was an unimportant town shown by the fact that it is mentioned nowhere in the Old Testament, nor in the Talmud, nor in Josephus, who mentions two hundred four towns and cities of Galilee. The way in which Luke introduces Galilee and Nazareth shows that he wrote to those unfamiliar with Palestine. Compare the conversation at John 1:45,46. Galilee comprised the lands of Zebulun, Naphtali, Issachar, and Asher. It was rich in trees and pastures. Its people were hardy and warlike.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-1.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

The scene now changes to a distant part of the country. Nazareth was in Galilee, fifty or sixty miles from Jerusalem.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-1.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

26.Now in the sixth month It was a wonderful dispensation of the divine purpose, and far removed from the ordinary judgment of men, that God determined to make the beginning of the generation of the herald more illustrious than that of his own Son. The prophecy respecting John was published in the temple and universally known: Christ is promised to a virgin in an obscure town of Judea, and this prophecy remains buried in the breast of a young woman. But it was proper that, even from the birth of Christ, that saying should be fulfilled,

it pleased God by foolishness to save them that believe,”
(
1 Corinthians 1:21.)

The treasure of this mystery was committed by him to a virgin in such a manner, that at length, when the proper time came, it might be communicated to all the godly. It was, I own, a mean kind of guardianship; but whether for trying the humility of faith, or restraining the pride of the ungodly, it was the best adapted. Let us learn, even when the reason does not immediately appear, to submit modestly to God, and let us not be ashamed to receive instruction from her who carried in her womb Christ the eternal wisdom of God,” (1 Corinthians 1:24.) There is nothing which we should more carefully avoid than the proud contempt that would deprive us of the knowledge of the inestimable secret, which God has purposely “hid from the wise and prudent, and revealed ” to the humble and “to babes, ” (Luke 10:21.)

It was, I think, for the same reason that he chose a virgin betrothed to a man There is no foundation for Origen’s opinion, that he did this for the purpose of concealing from Satan the salvation which he was preparing to bestow on men. The marriage was a veil held out before the eyes of the world, that he who was commonly “supposed to be the son of Joseph ” (Luke 3:23) might at length be believed and acknowledged by the godly to be the Son of God. Yet the entrance of Christ into the world was not destitute of glory; for the splendor of his Godhead was manifested from the commencement by his heavenly Father. Angels announced that “a Savior was born,” (Luke 2:11;) but their voice was only heard by the shepherds, and traveled no farther. One miracle, — everywhere published by “the wise men who came from the east, ” (Matthew 2:1) that they had seen a star which proclaimed the birth of the Highest King,—may have been highly celebrated. Yet we see how God kept his Son, as it were, in concealment, until the time of his full manifestation arrived, and then erected for him a platform, that he might be beheld by all.

The participle μεμνηστευμένην, which is employed by the Evangelist, signifies that the virgin had then been engaged to her bridegroom, but was not yet given as a wife to her husband. For it was customary among Jewish parents to keep their daughters some time at home, after they had been betrothed to men; otherwise, the law relating to the seduction of a betrothed damsel” (Deuteronomy 22:23) would have been unnecessary. Luke says that Joseph was of the house of David; for families are usually reckoned by the names of the men; but on this point we shall speak more fully in another place.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-1.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

angel

(See Scofield "Hebrews 1:4")


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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 1:26". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-1.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

HIGHLY FAVOURED OF THE LORD

‘And in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God … and said, Hail, thou that art highly favoured, the Lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women.’

Luke 1:26; Luke 1:28

Whether Mary was in her house, or what her engagement when Gabriel visited her, we know not; but he instantly saluted her—‘Hail!’ After this brief salutation, Gabriel bids Mary rejoice, because being ‘highly favoured’ she is to be the mother of the Messiah. This, in truth, was the honour for which every Hebrew female intensely longed from the beginning; but Mary was Divinely chosen for this signal pre-eminency.

I. Mary’s joy.—What joy she felt when Gabriel assured her of this! When he left, she hastened to her cousin Elizabeth, in the upland country, to communicate the information and the joy to her. ‘Only the meeting of saints in heaven can parallel the meeting of these two cousins: the two wonders of the world under one roof, declaring their mutual happiness!’ (Luke 1:46-47).

II. Mary’s dignity.—High dignity, beside deep joy, was now conferred upon Mary. ‘Thou art highly favoured,’ said Gabriel to her. But this dignity was not of an earthly, fleeting nature; for Mary was left by the angel in the same humble condition in which he found her; and, in truth, her humble condition was the same at the birth of Christ, and to the day of her own death. The dignity, therefore, was heavenly and lasting. So it has proved itself. No woman, from Eve downward, has been so honoured as the Blessed Virgin of Nazareth. Her very memory is fragrant as Eden.

III. Mary’s blessedness.—Nor is this all: ‘The Lord is with thee.’ This constituted her real blessedness, and was the climax of the annunciation of the angel. The Lord was with Mary in two sublime senses—to sustain and further deepen the joy of her soul, and to perform the covenant which Gabriel had made with her at His bidding. Mary, in her glorious Magnificat, says of herself, ‘All generations shall call me blessed.’ This they have done since the birth of Christ, and this they will continue to do.

Illustration

The Festival of the Annunciation has been variously yet appropriately designated thus: ‘The Day of Salutation’; ‘the Day of the Gospel’; and ‘the Festival of the Incarnation.’ In many parts it was for some time the first day of the ecclesiastical year, as it is now, under its vernacular name—Lady-Day, the first quarterly division of the ordinary year. How the ancient Church observed the day can scarcely be ascertained now. And this is not a little remarkable, as the Christian Fathers have written numerous homilies on the day itself, and the Christian muse has for centuries been actively engaged in illustrating it. To the Christian artist, the holy mysteries of the day have ever had a special fascination, as shown by the pictures and paintings—some very grotesque, others very beautiful—which were produced during the first ages succeeding the Annunciation itself. Christians of the present day regard it as the first stage of the Incarnation. Hence we gladly keep the day as a holy festival, and fix our mind upon its marvels.’


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Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-1.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

26 And in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth,

Ver. 26. Unto a city of Galilee] God and his angels can find out his hidden ones, Psalms 83:3, in what corner of the country soever.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-1.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 1:26

The Great Gulf.

Consider the lasting distinction between the condition of the rich man and of Lazarus which the text brings before us. Abraham says that between the rich man and Lazarus a great gulf was fixed, so that none could pass from one side to the other. A great gulf fixed; observe, it is no slight interval, no trifling difference, but it is a chasm, a gulf and a wide one; and, moreover, it is fixed, the word in the original Greek is quite as strong as that which our English version has given, perhaps stronger; it means that this gulf or chasm has been firmly and durably established, that it is no slight or accidental difference which it may be hoped that time will blot out, but that it is a deep wide gap which no reasoning can hide, and no time can ever heal. It is most necessary that, as this is our Saviour's own description, we should take His words in all the fulness of their meaning, of course not straining them beyond their intention, but, also, not cutting off from them any of their strength.

I. What I conceive, then, that our Lord asserts in the text is this,—that there is a great impassable gulf fixed between the spiritual condition of those whom He represents by the rich man, and those whom He represents by Lazarus. The great gulf is not between the rich and the poor, not between those who have been favoured by God in this life and those who have been chastened by Him, but it is between those who have so used this world as to starve their spirits, those who have fixed their eyes so firmly on the things of time and sense that they could not see the realities of a future world, those who have become carnal and sensualised because they must needs give all their efforts to feed their bodies, and have been content to leave their souls uncared for.

II. And without pretending to go into the deep mystery of the other world, yet this, at least, is enough to show us the greatness of the gulf, and why it is so firmly fixed; the joys of heaven are spiritual, there is no pleasure there for a man who has no fear of God, no pleasure in obeying Him; and therefore he who by a long course of carelessness and self-indulgence and neglect of God has hardened his soul, has thereby put a gulf between heaven and him. The mere possibility of doing so should make all of us ask ourselves earnestly and with trembling, how far we are improving our opportunities. Even this is the seed-time of a long existence, and he who does not sow good seed, or having sown it does not water it and weed it, may not complain if his crop fail in the end.

Bishop Harvey Goodwin, Parish Sermons, 2nd series, p. 216.


References: Luke 16:26.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. ix., No. 518; J. Keble, Sermons for Sundays after Trinity, part i., p. 20; Homilist, vol. vi., p. 25.


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Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-1.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 1:26. In the sixth month Namely, of Elisabeth's pregnancy. Galilee was the most northern part of Palestine. It was bounded on the north by Lebanon and Syria, on the west by Phoenicia, on the south by Samaria, and on the east, according to Josephus, by Jordan and the sea of Tiberias; yet from the gospel it appears, that a part of the country north of the sea, and eastward of Jordan, was reckoned Galilee. Galilee therefore comprehended the possessions of the tribes of Issachar, Zebulun, Naphtali, and Asher. It was divided into upper and lower Galilee, whereof the former was called Galilee of the Gentiles, (Matthew 4:15.) because it bordered upon the Gentile nations, and was partly inhabited by them. Josephus tells us (Bel. L. 3. 100: 2.) that the whole country was exceeding populous and veryfruitful; that the number of its towns and villages was great; and that even in the lesser towns there were no less than fifteen thousand inhabitants.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-1.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

In this history of our Saviour's miraculous and immaculate conception, we have several things observable, as, 1. The messenger sent from heaven to publish the news of their conception of the son of God, an angel; an evil angel was the first author of our ruin; a good angel could not be the author of our restoration, but is the joyful reporter of it.

Observe, 2. The angel's name, Gabriel, which signifieth the power of God; the same angel who had many hundred years before declared to the prophet Daniel the coming of the Messiah.

Observe, 3. The place which the angel is sent unto, Nazareth, an obscure place, little taken notice of; yea, a city in Galilee, out of which arises no prophet; even there doth the God of prophets condescend to be conceived. No blind corner of Nazareth can hide the blessed virgin from the angel. The favours of God will find out his children wherever they are withdrawn.

Observe, 4. The person whom the angel is sent unto, To a virgin espoused, whose name was Mary; for the honour of virginity, Christ chose a virgin for his mother; for the honour of marriage, a virgin espoused to a husband.

Observe, 5. The message itself, Hail, thou that art highly favoured, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women.

Where note, that the angel salutes the virgin as a saint, he doth not pray to her as a goddess. The church of Rome idolatrously uses these words as a prayer to the holy virgin (saying ten Ave Maries for one Pater-Noster) whereas they are only a salutation; declaring that she above all women, had the honour freely conferred by God upon her to be the mother of the Messiah. The original word signifies, not full of grace but freely beloved.

Compare Mary with other renowned women, and what had she besides this favour, more than they? Had she the spirit of prophecy? so had they. Had she the spirit of sanctification? so had they: and she had no more immunity and freedom from sin and death than they.

Accordingly, says the angel, Blessed art thou among women; he doth not say, Blessed art thou above women. Let the church of Rome be as copious as they will in the commendation of the mother, so they do not derogate from the glory of the Son.

But how senseless are they,

1. In turning a salutation into a prayer!

2. In making use of these words upon every occasion, which were spoken by an angel upon a special occasion!

3. In applying these words to her now in heaven, which suited with her only when she was here on earth, saying, Full of grace, to her who is full of glory; and, The Lord is with thee, to her that is with the Lord!

Observe, 6. The effect which the sight and salutation of the angel had upon the holy virgin; she was afraid. If Zachary before her was amazed at the sight of the angel, much more the virgin, her sex subjecting her to fear. All passions, but particularly the passion of fear, disquiets the heart, and makes it unfit to receive the messages of God. Therefore the angel instantly says unto her, Fear not, let joy enter into thy heart, out of whose womb shall come salvation. Thus the fears of holy persons do end in comfort: joy was the errand which the angel came upon and not terror. What little cause she had to fear the presence of an angel, who was so highly favoured of him, at whose presence the angels tremble! But we see the holiest person on earth cannot bear the presence of a holy angel, much less the presence of a holy God, nor stand before the manifestations of his favours:

Lord! how unable then will the wicked be at the great day to stand before the manifestation of thy fury! If the sight of a holy angel now makes the best of saints to quake and tremble, what will the sight of an infinitely holy and just God then do, when the wicked shall be slain by the brightness of his presence?

Observe lastly, the character which the angel gives of the person that should be born of the blessed virgin, He shall be great, and called the son of the Highest. Great, in respect of his person: Great, in respect of his offices: Great, in respect of his kingdom; for God would settle upon him a spiritual kingdom, of which David's earthly one was a type which shall never be abolished: though the administration of it by the word and sacraments shall cease at the day of judgment, when he shall deliver up the kingdom, in that respect, to his father. All other kingdoms, have had, or shall have, their periods, but the gospel-church, which is Christ's kingdom, shall continue till his kingdom of glory be revealed.


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Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-1.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

26.] τῷ ἕκτῳ—referring to the πέντε in Luke 1:24.

ναζαρέτ] In this particular the information of our Evangelist appears to be fuller than that of Matthew, who seems not to be aware of any residence at Nazareth previous to the birth of our Lord: but see note on Matthew 2:22.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-1.html. 1863-1878.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 26,27. In the sixth month, that is, after Elisabeth’s conception; thus it is expounded afterward, Luke 1:36.

The angel Gabriel, the same angel that had appeared in the temple to Zacharias, who seemeth to have had a special ministration with reference to that part of God’s will which was predictive of the Messias; he

was sent from God (without whose command the angels do not move)

unto a city of Galilee named Nazareth. There Joseph lived; from thence he went, Luke 2:4. The angel came to the virgin, who is here described by her name, Mary, and her relation, she was espoused to one Joseph, who is said to be

of the house of David. Matthew reduces his genealogy to prove him to be so.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 1:26". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-1.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

26. Ἐν δὲ τῷ μηνὶ τῷ ἕκτῳ. i.e. after the vision of Zachariah. This is the only passage which indicates the age of John the Baptist, as half a year older than our Lord. The reader will observe how this, like most of the other sections of this narrative, falls naturally into three subsections: α. The Salutation, 26–29. β. The Message, 30–33. γ. The Meek Acceptance, 34–38.

τῆς Γαλιλαίας. Thus began to be fulfilled the prophecy of Isaiah 9:1-2. Galilee of the Gentiles (Gelîl haggoyîm), one of the four great Roman divisions of Palestine, was north of Judaea and Samaria, west of Peraea, and comprised the territories of Zebulun, Naphtali, Issachar and Asher (Matthew 4:13). Josephus describes it as rich in trees and pastures, strong, populous, containing 204 towns, of which the least had 15,000 inhabitants, and occupied by a hardy and warlike race, Bell. Jud. III. 3; Vit. 45, 52. See Map, and note on Luke 3:2.

ᾗ ὄνομα Ναζαρέτ. The expression shews that St Luke is writing for those who were unfamiliar with Palestine. See on Luke 2:51. Keim (Gesch. Jesu, I. 319) argues in favour of the form Nazara, i. from the adjectives Ναζωραῖος, Ναζαρηνός; ii. from the phrase ἀπὸ Ναζάρων in Eusebius; iii. from the modern name En-Nezirah. But there can be little doubt of the reading here, though Νάζαρα is read by some MSS. in Luke 4:16. Nazareth and Nazara may both have been in use, like Ramath and Rama. The derivation of the name is disputed, but it is probably derived from Netser, ‘a branch.’ For a description of the village see Life of Christ, I. 53.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-1.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

26. In the sixth month—After the annunciation to Zacharias.

Galilee—See note on Matthew 4:12.

Named Nazareth—See note on Matthew 2:23.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-1.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 1:26. In the sixth month. Not of the year, but of Elisabeth’s pregnancy.

Nazareth. The home of both Mary and Joseph, before the birth of Jesus. Matthew (Matthew 2:23) speaks of their residence there, after the return from Egypt.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-1.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 1:26. ναζαρέτ: the original home of Joseph and Mary, not merely the adopted home as we might infer from Matthew 2:23.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-1.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the sixth month. After the vision of Zachariah.

This (Compare Luke 1:36) is the passage which gives John"s age as six months older than the Lord"s. See App-179.

from. Greek. hupo. App-104.

unto. Greek. eis. App-104. Galilee. One of the four Roman divisions of Palestine, comprising Zebulun, Naphtali, and Asher. Compare Matthew 4:13.

Nazareth. Now enNazirah.

Aram. See App-94. See on Matthew 2:23.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth,

And in the sixth month of Elizabeth's conception the angel Gabriel was sent from God. I could envy thee, O Gabriel, these most exalted of all errands. But I remember that true greatness lies, not in the dignity of our calling, but in the right discharge of its duties-not in the loftiness of our talents, but in the use we make of them.

Unto a city named Nazareth. "Can any good thing come out of Nazareth?" asked the guileless Nathanael, having respect to its proverbially bad name. But the Lord selects His own places as well as persons.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-1.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

To a town in Galilee named Nazareth. To the home of Mary. Matthew tells of a later visit of the angel to Joseph (Matthew 1:20-25), but does not tell the angel's name.


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-1.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(26) And in the sixth month.—The time is obviously reckoned from the commencement of the period specified in Luke 1:24.

A city of Galilee, named Nazareth.—The town so named (now en-Nazirah) was situated in a valley among the hills that rise to a height of about 500 feet on the north of the Plain of Esdraelon. The valley itself is richly cultivated. The grassy slopes of the hills are clothed in spring-time with flowers. On one side there is a steep ridge that forms something like a precipice (Luke 4:29). In the rainy season the streams flow down the slopes of the hills and rush in torrents through the valleys. From a hill just behind the town, the modern Neby Ismail, there is one of the finest views in Palestine, including Lebanon and Hermon to the north, Carmel to the west, with glimpses of the Mediterranean, and to the south the Plain of Esdraelon and the mountains of Samaria, to the east and south-east Gilead, and Tabor, and Grilboa. It is a three days’ journey from Jerusalem, about twenty miles from Ptolemais, and eighteen from the Sea of Galilee, six from Mount Tabor, about six from Cana, and nine from Nain. The name, as stated in the Note on Matthew 2:23, was probably derived from the Hebrew Netzer (= a branch), and conveying something of the same meaning as our -hurst, or -holm, in English topography.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth,
the sixth
the angel
a city
2:4; Matthew 2:23; John 1:45,46; 7:41

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 1:26". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-1.html.

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