Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 10:33

But a Samaritan, who was on a journey, came upon him; and when he saw him, he felt compassion,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflicted;   Beneficence;   Commandments;   Duty;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Lawyer;   Liberality;   Love;   Neighbor;   Poor;   Readings, Select;   Samaria;   Self-Righteousness;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Bible Stories for Children;   Children;   Compassion;   Home;   Human;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Religion;   Samaritans;   Social Duties;   Stories for Children;   Sympathy-Pitilessness;   The Topic Concordance - Deeds;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Compassion and Sympathy;   Highways;   Parables;   Poor, the;   Samaria, Modern;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Jericho;   Parable;   Poor;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Justice;   Luke, gospel of;   Mercy;   Neighbour;   Samaria, samaritans;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Clean, Unclean;   Compassion;   Friend, Friendship;   Golden Rule;   Hospitality;   Law of Christ;   Love;   Mercy;   Neighbor;   Priest, Christ as;   Wealth;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Mercy;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Parable;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Hospitality;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Brotherly Love;   Compassion;   Jesus, Life and Ministry of;   Life;   Luke, Gospel of;   Mercy, Merciful;   Neighbor;   Parables;   Pity;   Samaria, Samaritans;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Canon of the New Testament;   Ethics;   Law;   Martha;   Mary;   Parable;   Pity;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Chance;   Character;   Commandments;   Discourse;   Heart;   Justice (2);   Law of God;   Levites;   Love (2);   Luke, Gospel According to;   Man (2);   Mission;   Money (2);   Nationality;   Neighbour (2);   New Commandment;   Palestine;   Parable;   Pity;   Pity Compassion;   Property (2);   Reality;   Religious Experience;   Samaria ;   Samaria, Samaritans;   Samaritan, the Good ;   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Saying and Doing;   Spiritualizing of the Parables;   Temple (2);   Toleration, Tolerance;   Trade and Commerce;   Trinity (2);   Wealth (2);   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Adummim;   Bethsaida;   Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Adum'mim;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Pharisees;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Compassion;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Law in the New Testament;   Neighbor;   Righteousness;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Brotherly Love;   Jesus of Nazareth;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for May 19;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Samaritan is mentioned merely to show that he was a person from whom a Jew had no right to expect any help or relief, because of the enmity which subsisted between the two nations.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

A certain Samaritan - The Samaritans were the most inveterate foes of the Jews. They had no dealings with each other. See the notes at Matthew 10:5. It was this fact which rendered the conduct of this good man so striking, and which was thus set in strong contrast with the conduct of the priest and the Levite. “They” would not help their own afflicted, and wounded countryman. “He,” who could not be expected to aid a Jew, overcame all the usual hostility between the people; saw in the wounded man a neighbor, a brother, one who needed aid; and kindly denied himself to show kindness to the stranger.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-10.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

But a certain Samaritan,.... By whom Christ may be meant; not that he was really so, for he was a Jew, a son of Abraham, and of David, according to the flesh, but he was so called by the Jews, John 8:48 and was treated as such by them: and since it is the design of the parable in general to show, that he that does acts of kindness and mercy to persons in distress, is a neighbour in the truest sense, though he is not an Israelite, but even a Samaritan, who was, above all men, hated by the Jews; why may it not be thought to be the view of Christ in particular, to prove himself the best neighbour and friend of men, though he was traduced by the Jews as a Samaritan?

as he journeyed; which may design the assumption of human nature, which is sometimes expressed, by his coming from his Father, by his descending from heaven, and coming into this world; which phrases intend his incarnation, and carry in them the idea of journeying: for as his ascent to heaven is expressed by taking a journey, Matthew 25:15 so may his descent from heaven; and while he was here on earth, he was as a stranger and pilgrim, as a sojourner and traveller:

came where he was; put himself in the legal place, and stead of his people, who fell with the rest of mankind in Adam; he became their surety from eternity, and clothed himself with their nature in time; he took upon him their sins, as their representative, and fulfilled the righteousness of the law on their account, and bore the penalty of it in their room:

and when he saw him; Christ saw the elect before the fall, as they were chosen in him, and given unto him, in all the glory they were to be brought into; when he loved them, and his delight was with them: and when he came to redeem them, he saw them as follows; as lost, as weak and strengthless, as wicked, and as the worst of sinners, as ungodly, and enemies, as children of wrath by nature, as others; and he shed his blood for them, and washed them from their sins, that he might present them to himself a glorious church, without spot or wrinkle, or any such thing; just such an one he had seen them to be, in the glass of his Father's purposes, in his council and covenant; and he sees them in their blood, and in the impurity of their nature, when he comes to call them by his grace:

and he had compassion on him. The compassion of Christ on his elect, is to be seen in his eternal covenant engagements; for his tender mercies have been ever of old; and in his assumption of their nature, which was through his own, as well as the tender mercy of his Father; and in the redemption of them, which was in love and pity; and also in their regeneration and conversion, for the great things there, and then done for them by him, are owing to his compassion.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-10.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Samaritan — one excommunicated by the Jews, a byword among them, synonymous with heretic and devil (John 8:48; see on Luke 17:18).

had compassion — His best is mentioned first; for “He who gives outward things gives something external to himself, but he who imparts compassion and tears gives him something from his very self” [Gregory the Great, in Trench]. No doubt the priest and Levite had their excuses - It is not safe to be lingering here; besides, he‘s past recovery; and then, may not suspicion rest upon ourselves? So might the Samaritan have reasoned, but did not [Trench]. Nor did he say, He‘s a Jew, who would have had no dealings with me (John 4:9), and why should I with him?

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

33. But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him.

[But a certain Samaritan.] The Jews have no dealings with the Samaritans: that is, so as to be obliged by them for any courtesy done to them. But would this Jew, half dead, reject the kindness of the Samaritan at this time? This person being of a nation than which the Jews hated nothing more, is brought in shewing this kindness to the Jew, on purpose to give the plainer instance, who is our neighbour. It might seem more proper to have said, that the Samaritan acknowledged the wounded man for his neighbour in being so kind to him: but our Saviour intimates that he was the wounded man's neighbour; thereby teaching us that even a stranger, yea, an enemy (against the doctrine of their own schools), is no other than our neighbour.

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-10.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

A certain Samaritan (Σαμαρειτης δε τιςSamareitēs de tis). Of all men in the world to do a neighbourly act!

As he journeyed (οδευωνhodeuōn). Making his way.

Came where he was (ηλτεν κατ αυτονēlthen kat' auton). Literally, “came down upon him.” He did not sidestep or dodge him, but had compassion on him.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Came where he was

There is a strong contrast with the other cases, and a downright heartiness in the words, κατ ' αὐτὸν , down to him. The Levite had come κατὰ τόπον , “down to the place.”

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him,

But a certain Samaritan came where he was — It was admirably well judged to represent the distress on the side of the Jew, and the mercy on that of the Samaritan. For the case being thus proposed, self interest would make the very scribe sensible, how amiable such a conduct was, and would lay him open to our Lord's inference. Had it been put the other way, prejudice might more easily have interposed, before the heart could have been affected.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-10.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

But a certain Samaritan1, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he was moved with compassion,

  1. A certain Samaritan. The hereditary enemy of the Jew (John 4:9).

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-10.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

A Samaritan. The peculiar point of this parable consists in representing the priest and the Levite persons of great reputation for sanctity among the Jews, as passing the wounded traveller, without compassion; while it was a Samaritan, a man whose whole nation were considered sinners and heretics, that stopped to relieve him.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-10.html. 1878.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

33 But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him,

Ver. 33. A certain Samaritan] Turnebus dictos putat Parabolanos, quasi aemulos Samaritani. Hoc autem nomine vocabantur, qui curandis debilium corporibus deputabantur. Those who looked to sick people were hence called Parabolanes, or Samaritans. This Samaritan is Christ. So they called him, John 8:48, but in a worse sense. {See Trapp on "John 8:48"}

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 10:33. But a certain Samaritan, Though the priest and Levite had passed by their distressed brother, a Samaritan, who happened to come by that way, shewed a different example: seeing a fellow-creature lying on the road, naked and wounded, he went up to him; and though he found it was one of a different nation, who professed a religion opposite to his own, nevertheless, the violent hatred which had been instilled into his mind from his earliest years towards all who professed that religion, with every other objection, was immediately silenced by the feelings of pity, awakened at the sight of the man's distress. His bowels yearned towards the Jew; he hastened with great tenderness to give him assistance. Some writers tell us, that the hatred between the Jews and Samaritans rose so high, that if a Jew and a Samaritan met in a narrow way, they were exceedingly solicitous that they might pass without touching each other, for fear of pollution on either side. This circumstance serves as a beautiful illustration of the humanity of this good Samaritan, who not only touched the Jew, but took so much pains to dress his wounds, and set him on his own beast; supporting him in his arms as he rode, as well as making such kind provision for him in the inn. It seems this humane traveller, according to the custom of those times, carried his provisions along with him, (see the next note,) for he was able, though in the fields, to give the wounded man some wine to recruit his spirits: moreover, he carefully bound up his wounds, soaking the bandages with a mixture of wine and oil, which he poured on them, and which is of a medicinal quality; and then, setting him on his own beast, he walked by him, and supported him. As the Jew was stripped by the robbers, it is probable that the Samaritan used some of his own garments for the binding up of his wounds, which was a further instance of his goodness;—perhaps tearing them to make a more convenient bandage. The reader will find an account of the use which the ancients made of wine and oil for dressing fresh wounds, in Bos's Exercitations, p. 24 and Wolfius on the text.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-10.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 10:30"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 10:33". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-10.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Самарянин Было редкостью, что самарянин шел этой дорогой. Сам самарянин рисковал встретить не только воров, но также враждебность со стороны других путешественников.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-10.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The love which the law of God requires, leads those who have it to do good, not merely to their friends or countrymen, but, as they have opportunity, to all, in imitation of Him who makes his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sends his rain on the just and on the unjust, and "who, though he was rich, for our sakes became poor, that we through his poverty might be rich."

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-10.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

33.A certain Samaritan—To what we have said in regard to the Samaritan, in our note on Matthew 10:5, (to which we refer the reader,) we may add that it is denied by Dr. Trench, in his work on the Parables, that the Samaritan had any Hebrew blood in him. Before they were brought from Assyria the land of Samaria had been cleared of its Hebrew inhabitants to a man, and room made for a purely Gentile importation. Robinson tells us that the Samaritans of the present day present not the Jewish physiognomy. If so, the Samaritan was to the Jew a heathen in blood, a heretic and pretender in creed, a hereditary enemy in practice. The Jew derided the Samaritan as a Cuthite, abhorred his meals as swine’s flesh, and cursed him in the synagogue. The Samaritans shed the blood of Jewish travellers to the Passover, gave false signals to the near province as to the time of the new moon, and even by stealth polluted the Temple by scattering dead men’s bones in their holy places.

As he journeyed—The Samaritan was not, like the others, a mere foot-passenger between the two cities; but he comes upon a beast, doubtless to be supposed an ass, from a distance. He is himself little likely to be treated with any favour in this latitude.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-10.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was, and when he saw him, he was moved with compassion,”

When Jesus introduced a Samaritan into the story (possibly the Scribe was expecting a Pharisee next) he must have stiffened. He probably did not like the way this story was going. But gritting his teeth he listened on. And Jesus told how the Samaritan as he journeyed, came where the man was and when he saw him was moved with compassion. Note the emphasis on compassion. It was precisely that that Jesus constantly accused the Jewish authorities and teachers of lacking (Matthew 12:7). But this man had compassion, even though he was a Samaritan, (and the fact that he was so is emphasised in the Greek).

(Now to be fair we must acknowledge that this man was an unusual Samaritan. Most Samaritans would have spat as they passed by and have thought that it was a good thing that there was one less Jew. But in all races and religions there are men of compassion, and here was one of them).

It is difficult to see how in one word Jesus could have found a better description of Himself than a Samaritan. It was the jibe thrown at Him by the Judaisers which they saw as an accepted description among them (Luke 8:48). Samaritans also believed firmly in the Law of God, and a Samaritan would have agreed with the need to keep Deuteronomy 6:5 and Leviticus 19:18. Yet like Him they were seen as unorthodox. But that was a thought at the back of the parable to be considered later by those who had eyes to see. To this Pharisee the man described was a literal Samaritan.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-10.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:33. A certain Samaritan. The choice of a Samaritan to represent this character shows that the wounded man was a Jew, but this is a secondary thought. The Samaritans were Gentiles by extraction, but with the Pentateuch in their possession.

He was moved with compassion. From this feeling all the subsequent actions flow. The first step in becoming ‘good Samaritans,’ is to obtain this feeling. But law, good resolutions, beautiful moral examples, and the whole array of human contrivances fail to create it. It is learned from Christ.—‘Mark the beautiful climax. First the compassionate heart, then the helping hand, next the ready foot, finally the true-hearted charge.’ Van Oosterzee.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-10.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 10:33. , a Samaritan: will he a fortiori pass by? No, he does not, that the surprise and the point of the story. The unexpected happens.— , here only in N. T., making a journey, presumably longer than from Jerusalem to Jericho, fully equipped for a long journey (Hahn), and so in possession of means for help, if he have the will.— , was touched with pity. That sacred feeling will keep him from passing by, though tempted by his own affairs to go on and avoid trouble and loss of time, as ships may pass by other ships in distress, so deserving ever after to have branded on them .

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-10.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

journeyed. Greek. hodeuo. Occurs only here.

came where he was. A beautiful type of the Lord. And the end is seen in John 14:3.

where he was = to (kata, as above) him.

had compassion = was moved with compassion.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him,

But a certain Samaritan - one of a race excommunicated by the Jews; a byword among them, and synonymous with heretic and devil (John 8:48; and see the note at Luke 17:18);

As he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him. Compare what is said of the Lord Himself: "And when the Lord saw her (the widow of Nain). He had compassion on her" (Luke 7:13). No doubt the priest and Levite had their excuses for passing by their wounded brother.-`'Tisn't safe to be lingering hero; besides, he's past recovery; and then, mayn't suspicion rest upon ourselves?' So might the Samaritan have reasoned-but did not. Nor did he say, 'He would have had no dealings with me (John 4:9), and why should I with him?

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(33) A certain Samaritan.—For the chief facts connected with the Samaritans and their relation to the Jews, see Note on Luke 9:52. There is something noticeable in the change of word. It was not likely that the hated alien should be coming down from Jerusalem. His journey would probably be to, or from, Bethel and Gerizim. He was not, as the others were, near a home to which they might have taken the wounded sufferer. Here there is a true human feeling in one who outwardly was involved in heresy and schism, and our Lord singles that out as infinitely preferable to the form of godliness without its power.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

But a certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, came where he was: and when he saw him, he had compassion on him,
Samaritan
9:52,53; 17:16-18; Proverbs 27:10; Jeremiah 38:7-13; 39:16-18; John 4:9; 8:48
he had
7:13; Exodus 2:6; 1 Kings 8:50; Matthew 18:33
Reciprocal: Proverbs 25:21 - GeneralActs 16:33 - washed;  1 Peter 3:8 - having

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 10:33". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-10.html.