Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 10:34

and came to him and bandaged up his wounds, pouring oil and wine on them; and he put him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn and took care of him.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflicted;   Anointing;   Beneficence;   Commandments;   Disease;   Duty;   Inn;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Lawyer;   Liberality;   Love;   Medicine;   Neighbor;   Poor;   Readings, Select;   Samaria;   Self-Righteousness;   Symbols and Similitudes;   Wounds;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Anointing;   Beneficence;   Bible Stories for Children;   Brotherly Kindness;   Children;   Compassion;   Disease;   Health-Disease;   Helpfulness;   Home;   Human;   Kindness;   Kindness-Cruelty;   Liberality-Parsimony;   Oil;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Prevention and Cure of Diseases;   Religion;   Remedies;   Social Duties;   Stories for Children;   Sympathy-Pitilessness;   Work-Workers, Religious;   The Topic Concordance - Deeds;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Anointing;   Emblems of the Holy Spirit, the;   Oil;   Parables;   Poor, the;   Samaria, Modern;   Travellers;   Wine;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Jericho;   Parable;   Poor;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Disease;   Grapes;   Justice;   Luke, gospel of;   Mercy;   Neighbour;   Oil;   Samaria, samaritans;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Clean, Unclean;   Friend, Friendship;   Golden Rule;   Heal, Health;   Hospitality;   Law of Christ;   Love;   Mercy;   Neighbor;   Priest, Christ as;   Wealth;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Mercy;   CARM Theological Dictionary - Parable;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Beast;   Inn;   Oil;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Hospitality;   Inn;   Oded;   Oil;   Wine;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Adummim;   Anoint;   Brotherly Love;   Cattle;   Diseases;   Inn;   Jesus, Life and Ministry of;   Life;   Luke, Gospel of;   Neighbor;   Oil;   Ointment;   Parables;   Samaria, Samaritans;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Adummim;   Canon of the New Testament;   Ethics;   Hospitality;   Law;   Martha;   Mary;   Medicine;   Oil;   Parable;   Pity;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Animals;   Anointing;   Anointing (2);   Character;   Commandments;   Cures;   Discourse;   Guest-Chamber;   Heart;   House;   Impotence;   Inn;   Justice (2);   Law of God;   Levites;   Love (2);   Luke, Gospel According to;   Man (2);   Mission;   Money (2);   Neighbour (2);   New Commandment;   Oil ;   Oil (Olive);   Parable;   Physician (2);   Property (2);   Reality;   Religious Experience;   Samaria ;   Samaria, Samaritans;   Samaritan, the Good ;   Sanctify, Sanctification;   Saying and Doing;   Spiritualizing of the Parables;   Temple (2);   Toleration, Tolerance;   Trade and Commerce;   Trinity (2);   Wealth (2);   Wine ;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Inn;   Oil;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Adummim;   Bethsaida;   Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Inn;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Adum'mim;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Inn;   Oil;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Commerce;   Inn;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Beast;   Care;   Compassion;   Hospitality;   Inn;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Law in the New Testament;   Neighbor;   Oil;   Olive Tree;   Righteousness;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Anointing;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Brotherly Love;   Inn;   Jesus of Nazareth;  
Devotionals:
Every Day Light - Devotion for May 19;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Pouring in oil and wine - These, beaten together, appear to have been used formerly as a common medicine for fresh wounds. Bind up a fresh cut immediately in a soft rag or lint, moistened with pure olive oil, and the parts will heal by what is called the first intention, and more speedily than by any other means.

An inn - Πανδοχειον, from παν, all, and δεχομαι, I receive; because it receives all comers.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Pouring in oil and wine - These were often used in medicine to heal wounds. Probably they were mingled together, and had a highly sanative quality. How strikingly is his conduct contrasted with the priest and Levite! And, how particularly as well as beautifully by this does our Saviour show what we ought to do to those who are in circumstances of need! He does not merely say “in general” that he showed him kindness, but he “told how” it was done. He stopped - came where he was - pitied him - bound up his wound - set him on his own beast - conducted him to a tavern - passed the night with him, and then secured the kind attendances of the landlord, promising him to pay him for his trouble and all this without desiring or expecting any reward. If this had been by a Jew, it would have been signal kindness; if it had been by a Gentile, it would also have been great kindness; but it was by a Samaritan - a man of a nation most hateful to the Jews, and therefore it most strikingly shows what we are to do to friends and foes when they are in distress.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-10.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And went to him, and bound up his wounds,.... Which sin had made; it being part of the work of Christ, to bind up the broken-hearted, to heal wounded sinners, and restore comforts to mourners; and which he does, by

pouring in oil and wine: by which, in general, may be designed, the blood of Christ, applied to the conscience of a wounded sinner; which cleanses from all sin, heals all the wounds and diseases of sin, cheers and revives fainting spirits, gives ease, peace, and pleasure, and is therefore exceeding valuable and precious: and in particular by "oil" may be meant, the grace of the Spirit of God; compared unto it, for its sweet smell, its cheering and refreshing virtue and efficacy, and its cooling, softening, supplying, and healing nature: and by "wine", the doctrines of the Gospel; such as free justification by Christ's righteousness, and pardon through his blood; which when applied to distressed minds, cause joy and gladness, and them to forget their sorrow, and remember their misery no more: and the pouring in of these, may denote the plentiful effusion of Christ's blood, and the riches of his grace in the application of it; and the freeness and generousness of this action, which is his own: for man cannot do it. It was usual with the Jews, to mix oil and wine together, for the healing of wounds: hence those rules and traditionsF23T. Hieros. Sabbat, fol. 14. 3. & Beracot, fol. 3. 1. ;

"they anoint a linen cloth for a sick man on the sabbath; when? when they mingle the oil and the wine on the sabbath eve, but if they do not mingle it on the sabbath eve, it is forbidden; it is a tradition, says R. Simeon ben Eleazer, R. Meir pronounced it lawful, לטרוף יין ושמן to mingle wine and oil, and to anoint the sick on the sabbath.'

So oil and wine were mingled together, and used to heal the sore occasioned by circumcisionF24Misn. Sabbat, c. 19. sect. 2. .

and set him on his own beast; by which may be meant, either the red horse of Christ's humanity, Zechariah 1:8 to which he has united all his people; and in which he has bore their persons, and has represented them, and still bears them on his heart: or the white horse of the Gospel, Revelation 6:2 compared to a horse for its strength, swiftness, and usefulness in battle; and to a "white" one, for the purity of its doctrines, the joy and peace it brings, and the victory it obtains: and this is Christ's own, and on which he himself rides, and shows his glory, and goes forth conquering and to conquer: and on which he sets his people, and they are carried out of the reach of men and devils to destroy them, and are caused to ride on the high places of the earth:

and brought him to an inn; a church of Christ, where the Gospel guides, directs, and carries souls: saints are not at home in their proper city and country, they are travellers here, and need refreshment by the way; and a church of Christ is as an inn, for the entertainment of such: it is large, and has room enough for as many as come to it; and is well stored with provisions of all sorts, signified by bread, and milk, and wine, a feast of fat things, a furnished table, Zion's provisions, the goodness and fatness of God's house; and has rivers of pleasure, and very good lodgings, sure dwellings, and quiet habitations; all which is agreeable to weary travellers: and hither Christ brings his people, whom he saves and calls; it is his will that they should be in a church state, and it is his own act to bring them there, and it is their great privilege to be thither brought:

and took care of him; clothed him with his righteousness, fed him with the choicest of provisions, gave him reviving cordials of love, refreshing promises, exceeding great and precious ones; and larger supplies of grace, with protection and preservation from all evils.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-10.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

oil and wine — the remedies used in such cases all over the East (Isaiah 1:6), and elsewhere; the wine to cleanse the wounds, the oil to assuage their smartings.

on his own beast — himself going on foot.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

34. And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.

[Pouring in oil and wine.] It is a tradition. "They spread a plaster for the sick on the sabbath day: that is, upon condition they had mingled it with wine and oil on the evening of the sabbath. But if they have not mixed it on the sabbath, it is forbidden. A tradition. R. Simeon Ben Eliezer saith, That it is allowed by R. Meir, both to mingle the oil and the wine, and also to anoint the sick on the sabbath day."

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-10.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Bound up his wounds (κατεδησεν τα τραυματαkatedēsen ta traumata). First aorist active indicative of καταδεωkatadeō old verb, but here only in the N.T. The verb means “bound down.” We say “bind up.” Medical detail that interested Luke. The word for “wounds” (τραυματαtraumata) here only in the N.T.

Pouring on them oil and wine (επιχεων ελαιον και οινονepicheōn elaion kai oinon). Old verb again, but here only in the N.T. Oil and wine were household remedies even for wounds (soothing oil, antiseptic alcohol). Hippocrates prescribed for ulcers: “Bind with soft wool, and sprinkle with wine and oil.”

Set him (επιβιβασαςepibibasas). An old verb επιβιβαζωepibibazō (επιepi βιβαζωbibazō), to cause to mount. In the N.T. only here and Acts 19:35; Acts 23:24, common in lxx.

Beast (κτηνοςktēnos). Old word from κταομαιktaomai to acquire, and so property (κτημαktēma) especially cattle or any beast of burden.

An inn (πανδοχειονpandocheion). The old Attic form was πανδοκειονpandokeion (from πανpan all, and δεχομαιdechomai to receive). A public place for receiving all comers and a more pretentious caravanserai than a καταλυμαkataluma like that in Luke 2:7. Here only in the N.T. There are ruins of two inns about halfway between Bethany and Jericho.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-10.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Bound up ( κατέδησεν )

Only here in New Testament.

Wounds ( τραύματα )

Only here in New Testament.

Pouring in ( ἐπιχέων )

Rather upon ( ἐπί ), as Rev. Wine to cleanse, and oil to soothe. See Isaiah 1:6.

Oil and wine

Usual remedies for sores, wounds, etc. Hippocrates prescribes for ulcers, “Bind with soft wool, and sprinkle with wine and oil.”

Beast ( κτῆνος )

Perhaps akin to κτῆμα , a possession; since animals anciently constituted wealth, so that a piece of property and a beast were synonymous terms.

Inn ( πανδοχεῖον )

Only here in New Testament. From πᾶν , all, and δέχομαι , to receive:a place of common reception. See on inn, Luke 2:7. Remains of two khans, or inns, on the road between Jericho and Jerusalem are mentioned by modern travellers. Porter (“Handbook of Syria and Palestine”) speaks of one about a mile from Bethany, and another farther on, at the most dangerous part of the road, an extensive, ruined caravanserai, called Khan el Almah, situated on the top of a bleak ridge. Concerning the former, Hepworth Dixon (“Holy Land”) says: “About midway in the descent from Bethany to Jericho, in a position commanding a view of the road above and below, … on the very spot where search would be made for them, if no such ruins were suspected of existing, stands a pile of stones, archways, lengths of wall, which the wandering Arabs call Khan Houdjar, and still make use of as their own resting-place for the night. These ruins are those of a noble inn; the lewan, the fountain, and the court, being plainly traceable in the ruins.”

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-10.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.

Pouring in oil and wine — Which when well beaten together are one of the best balsams that can be applied to a fresh wound.

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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-10.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

and came to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring on [them] oil and wine1; and he set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.

  1. And bound up his wounds, pouring on [them] oil and wine. The ordinary remedies for wounds (Isaiah 1:6).

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-10.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

34 And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.

Ver. 34. Pouring in oil and wine] Wine to search, and oil to supple. Wine signifies the sharpness of the law (saith Melancthon), oil the sweetness of the gospel. Now, so great is the natural sympathy and harmony between the vine and the olive; that the olive being grafted into the vine, brings forth both grapes and olives.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-10.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 10:34. Brought him to an inn, In ancient times travellers used to carry their provisions along with them, because there were no inns for the entertainment of strangers, but only houses for lodging them; such as the khanes, or karavanseras in the eastern countries are to this day. These, as travellers tell us, consist of a capacious square, on all sides of which are a number of rooms on a ground floor, used occasionally for chambers, warehouses, and stables. Above stairs there is a colonnade, or gallery, on every side of which are the doors of a number of small rooms, wherein the merchants, as well strangers as natives, transact most of their business. In these karavanseras travellers can sometimes purchase straw and provender for their horses, mules, or other beasts, though, generally speaking, they supply them with nothing but rooms to lodge in. The Πανδοχειον, or inn here mentioned, was of this kind; for the Samaritan, while he was there, furnished the wounded Jew with all things necessary out of his own stores, and only committed him to the care of the innkeeper when he went away. We have two instances in scripture of the custom now mentioned. See Judges 19:19. Dr. Shaw, in the Preface to his Travels, p. 14 mentions another sort of inn, called connack: this, he says, denotes the place itself, whether covered or not, where travellers, or caravans halt, to refresh themselves and their beasts. Thus the malon or inn, Genesis 42:27; Genesis 43:21 where the sons of Jacob opened their sacks to give their asses provender, was no other than one of these resting-places. In the parable it is the other sort of inn that is mentioned, as is plain from its having an innkeeper, which the connack in the deserts of Arabia has not.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-10.html. 1801-1803.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:34. ἐπιχέων κ. τ. λ.] while he, as he was binding them up, poured on them oil and wine, the ordinary remedy in the case of wounds (see the passages in Wetstein and Paulus), which he carried with him for any casual need.

ἐπὶ τὸ ἴδιον κτῆνος] on his own beast (his ass), so that thus he himself gave up its use.

πανδοχεῖον] instead of the Attic πανδοκεῖον, Lobeck, ad Phryn. p. 307. The word has also passed over into the Rabbinical vocabulary: פונדק, see Lightfoot, p. 799. We must picture to ourselves a caravanserai, over which presided an ordinary landlord.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-10.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 10:34. ἔλαιον καὶ οἶνον, oil and wine) Those things are easy to be procured, which are most necessary for the exercising of love.— ἐπιβίβασας, having set him on) with labour to himself.— ἴδιον, his own) which he himself had used.— εἰς πανδοχεῖον, to an inn) The language in this passage is wonderfully popular (adapted to the intelligence of even the common multitude).

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-10.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 10:30"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 10:34". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-10.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

масло и вино Вероятно, их носили большинство путешественников в небольших количествах как комплект первой помощи пострадавшему. Вино было антисептиком: облегчало боль и исцеляло.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-10.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

34.Went to him—First he saw him at a distance, as lying in his blood, yet living. Next he had compassion on him. Third, he did not pass around him, nor pass on from him, but went to him. He closed the lips of his gashes and bound them up. He had probably none of the balsam for which Jericho was in that day famous. But he had some of that oil which the Orientals consider so beneficial in their hot climate, the expressed juice of the olive. See note on Matthew 6:17. So Jacob, even when a foot-passenger, carried his oil with him. Genesis 28:18. If the oil was brought from Samaria, it was celebrated for its excellence. Ancient physicians recommended the use of both wine and oil, the first to cleanse the wound, and the last to soothe and heal. Sometimes they were mingled into a compound called an oinoleum.

Brought him to an inn—The Greek word for inn here signifies a Take-all or Khan; and one is mentioned by travellers as still standing by the road, claimed to be the inn here specified. See note on Luke 1:7.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-10.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“And came to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring on them oil and wine, and he set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.”

And the Samaritan took up the man and bound up his wounds, and treated them as best he could with what he had available, with oil and wine. These two items are both well attested as being used for healing purposes. And then he put him on his own ass and bore him to a wayside inn and took care of him.

The picture is all one of someone who is revealing the love of God and a heart full of compassion. And that is certainly how we should first see it, and as the Pharisee saw it. But behind the picture lies the description of the One Who was all compassion, and had Himself come out of compassion in order spiritually to do this very thing.

‘He came to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring on them oil and wine.’ He sued what mean he had to hand. But we may note that abundance of oil and wine is very much to be an indication of the last days (Joel 2:19; Joel 2:24). So this one who had come pouring in oil and wine is a symbol of the ‘the last days’. The days of the Messiah are in mind here.

There are also points of contact between this aspect of the story and 2 Chronicles 28:15. There members of the Northern kingdom of Israel (Samaria and Galilee) returned men who had been taken captive to Judah, providing them with food and drink, anointing them with oil, and bearing them on their asses. There too ‘the people of God’ had been cared for by unorthodox people from the north, from Samaria and Galilee. Thus Jesus may well have expected the Scribe and His other listeners, once they considered His words more deeply, to make the connection and see that the Samaritan represented the northern kingdom of Israel including Galilee, and was therefore a picture of the unorthodox, rejected, Prophet of Galilee introducing ‘the last days’.

Here then was a picture for all to consider of the One Who had come as a physician for sick Israel (Luke 5:31) in order to make them spiritually whole and provide them with oil and wine.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-10.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 10:34. Pouring on them oil and wine. The usual remedies for wounds in the East.

On his own beast. So that he walked himself. True philanthropy involves self-sacrifice.

An inn. Evidently an inn, in our sense of the word, and not a caravanserai.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-10.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 10:34. , : both technical terms in medicine.— : not separately, but mixed; in use among Greeks and Romans as well as Jews (Wetstein).— = from , generally a property, and specially a domestic animal: one’s beast.— (in classics .), a place for receiving all comers, an inn having a host, not merely a khan or caravanserai like in Luke 2:7.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-10.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

is the allegorical meaning of the parable: The man that fell among robbers, represents Adam and his posterity; Jerusalem, the state of peace and innocence, which man leaves by going down to Jericho, which means to moon, the state of trouble and sin: the robbers represent the devil, who stripped him of his supernatural gifts, and wounded him in his natural faculties: the priest and Levite represent the old law: the Samaritan, Christ; and the beast, his humanity. The inn means the Church; wine, the blood of Christ; oil, his mercy; whilst the host signifies St. Peter and his successors, the bishops and priests of the Church. (Origen, St. Jerome, St. Ambrose, St. Augustine, and others)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-10.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

bound up. Greek. katadeo, a medical word. Occurs only

here in N.T.

wounds. Greek. trauma. Occurs only here.

pouring in. Greek. epicheo. Occurs only here.

on = upon. Greek. epi. App-104.

inn. Greek. pandocheion = a khan. Occurs onlyhere inN.T.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.

And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine - the remedies used in such cases all over the East (Isaiah 1:6), and elsewhere; the wine to cleanse the wounds, the oil to assuage their smartings.

And set him on his own beast - himself going on foot, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-10.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(34) And went to him.—Every detail is in harmony with the tender pity described in the previous verse. All fear of risk from robbers, or from the police of Rome, who might take him for a robber, is put aside; the “oil and wine,” which had been provided for personal refreshment, are freely given to be used, according to the primitive surgery of the time, the latter for cleansing the wounds, the former for soothing inflammation. His own beast (better, ass, as the word is translated in Matthew 21:5; 2 Peter 2:16) is given up, and he goes on foot; he takes the wounded man to an inn, and there provides for him.

To an inn.—The word is not the same as that in Luke 2:7, and implies the Western type of hostelry, where the landlord provides for his guests, while in the earlier passage we have the Eastern caravanserai, where the guests simply find shelter, and arrange their meals for themselves.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And went to him, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own beast, and brought him to an inn, and took care of him.
went
34; Exodus 23:4,5; Proverbs 24:17,18; 25:21,22; Matthew 5:43-45; Romans 12:20; 1 Thessalonians 5:15
bound
Psalms 147:3; Isaiah 1:5,6; Mark 14:8
an inn
2:7; Genesis 42:27; Exodus 4:24
Reciprocal: Acts 16:33 - washed;  Acts 23:24 - beasts

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 10:34". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-10.html.