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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 13:30

"And behold, some are last who will be first and some are first who will be last."

Adam Clarke Commentary

There are last which shall be first - See on Matthew 19:30; (note).


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-13.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And behold, there are last which shall be first,.... The Gentiles, the most mean and abject, afar from God, aliens from the commonwealth of Israel, called last of all; these shall be first, and sit down among patriarchs and prophets, men of the first rank here on earth, in the kingdom of heaven, and enjoy the same glory and happiness with them:

and there are first which shall be last: the Jews, who were first the visible professing people of God, to whom the oracles of God, and outward privileges and ordinances were given; who had the Messiah first sent to them, and the Gospel first preached among them; these shall be last, be rejected and despised, and shut out of the kingdom of heaven, they thought themselves heirs of, and expected to enjoy; see Matthew 19:30.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-13.html. 1999.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

SALVATION OF THE JEWS

Luke 13:30. Behold, the last shall be first, and the first shall be last.” The Jews had long stood at the front of the world. Because they rejected Christ they were relegated to the rear, the Gentiles coming to the front, where they are today. Yet we see from this, and in innumerable promises in both Testaments, that the fallen children of Abraham are coming back into the kingdom of God, to take their place as in days of yore; however, these promises are restricted to the elect few, as in the case of the Gentiles. The prophetic eye of Jesus, looking through the rolling centuries, saw the desolation of the land, the destruction of that generation, the survival of His race, the final return of the elect, restoration of the land, and the conversion of His people down at the end of the Gentile age; as here He says that the Jews will be the last to receive the gospel, and (Ezekiel 37) that they will be gathered back in their unregenerate state — i.e., “valley of dry bones” — involving the conclusion that the elect children of Abraham will return to the Holy Land before there is a general conversion of them to Christianity, which will be the last great evangelistic work of the Gospel Age. The universal commotion among the Jews, and their rapid return to the Holy Land despite the most formidable difficulties, is a certain prophetic omen that the end of all things is nigh. Earth and hell are combined to prevent the return of the Jews, the Mohammedan-Turkish Government doing everything in her power to keep them out, passing laws forbidding their citizenization in that country, and permitting them only to visit it as sojourners thirty days, under the most rigid and tyrannical restrictions. This law passed the Porte, A. D. 1874, when there were only about five thousand Jews in all the Holy Land. Despite all their tyrannical restrictions, there are now two hundred thousand, and coming rapidly all the time. I especially investigated this subject, and have it from the most reliable sources. It is not much known, as the Jews have to keep the matter secret. In Jerusalem alone there are fifty-five thousand Jews, one-half of the whole population; besides, they have great, growing, and flourishing colonies at Janneh, Safed (Sah-fed, old Chorazin), Nazareth, Shechem, Caesarea, Joppa, Hebron, Bethlehem, Ekron, Ashdod, Tiberias, and many other places. The attention of all Christendom is now being called to the consideration of restoring to the Jews their own country, which God gave them, and it is going to be done very soon. If you will attend the “wailing of the Jews” without the temple, at the west end (as it is a penalty of death for a Jew to put his foot inside the holy Temple Campus), and hear their weeping and wailing, down on their knees, kissing the great stones which Solomon put in the temple, reading from their Hebrew Bible the promises of God to hear their cries from every land of their dispersion and gather them back to their holy land and city, methinks you would conclude that the answer is nigh. I know not when, in all my life, I have so vividly realized the presence of God as when I attended those wailings. I verily felt that the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob was listening to the cry of His unfortunate children, and do believe that the answer is now coming from Heaven for the gathering of Israel from every land and nation. How wonderfully the Jews make that country bud and blossom, and again bend beneath the delicious fruits and luxurious crops of which we read in the Bible, sounding in our ears like paradoxes!


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Bibliography
Godbey, William. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/luke-13.html.

People's New Testament

The last shall be first. See notes on Matthew 20:16.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "People's New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-13.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Last (εσχατοιeschatoi). This saying was repeated many times (Matthew 19:30; Mark 10:31; Matthew 20:16).


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-13.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And, behold, there are last which shall be first, and there are first which shall be last.

But there are last — Many of the Gentiles who were latest called, shall be most highly rewarded; and many of the Jews who were first called, shall have no reward at all. Matthew 19:30.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-13.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And behold, there are last who shall be first, and there are first who shall be last1.

  1. There are last who shall be first, and there are first who shall be last. A familiar proverb of Christ's (Matthew 19:30; Matthew 20:10), to be interpreted by such passages as Matthew 21:31; Romans 9:30,31. The Jew who thought the Gentile had no hope at all, and that he himself was sure of salvation, would be surprised to find that his opinion was the very reverse of the real fact as time developed it.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-13.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

There are last; those who enjoy few spiritual privileges, and who are little esteemed in this life.


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Bibliography
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-13.html. 1878.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

30.And, lo, they are last who shall be first The same words, as we shall elsewhere see, were frequently employed by Christ, but in a different sense, (Matthew 19:30; Mark 10:31.) All that he intended here was, to throw down the vain confidence of the Jews, who, having been chosen by God in preference to all the rest of the world, trusted to this distinction, and imagined that God was in a manner bound to them. For this reason, Christ threatens that their condition will soon be changed; that the Gentiles, who were at that time cast off, would obtain the first rank; and that the Jews, deprived of their honor, would not even occupy the farthest corner in the Church. (475)


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-13.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

30 And, behold, there are last which shall be first, and there are first which shall be last.

Ver. 30. See Matthew 19:30; Matthew 20:16; Mark 10:31.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-13.html. 1865-1868.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

30.] As the words here stand—somewhat different from those in Matthew 20:16—they seem to be a prophetic declaration of what shall be in the course of the ingathering of these guests;—viz. that some who were the first, or among the first to believe, shall fall from their high place, and vice versa. This former has, as Stier notices (iii. 200), been remarkably the case with the Oriental Churches, which were the first founded and flourishing:—and, we may add, with the mother Church of Jerusalem, which has declined, while her Gentile offsets have flourished.


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Bibliography
Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-13.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1536

THE LAST FIRST, AND THE FIRST LAST

Luke 13:30. Behold, there are last which shall be first; and there are first which shall be last.

THIS is a declaration frequently made by our blessed Lord; and therefore we may be sure it contains some very important truths, that deserve our deepest attention. Persons who are addicted to human systems will put an exceedingly different construction upon these words; some pressing them to an unwarrantable extent; whilst others limit them, so as to enervate and destroy all their force. We, however, desire to treat them, not in a proud and controversial spirit, but in a spirit of humility and love; equally avoiding both extremes, and endeavouring to deduce from them such practical instruction as our Lord himself intended them to convey. With this view, I will,

I. Shew to what an extent they have been realized—

That God acts as a Sovereign in the communication of good, we have no doubt; but not so in the distribution of evil: and therefore, whilst we see in this passage a clear evidence of electing love, we cannot for a moment admit that there is any ground for the doctrine of absolute reprobation. If the last are made first, it is by the grace of God: but if the first are made last, it is altogether by their own fault. This will appear in every part of the subject; whilst I shew, that the truth here conveyed has been realized in all ages, and is yet daily realized amongst men, in whatever light they be viewed. View them,

1. In their national privileges—

[The Jews were God’s peculiar people. Never did any nation under heaven enjoy such privileges as they. They, for the space of two thousand years, were “the first” in every thing that related to eternal life. As for the poor benighted Gentiles, they were left in darkness and the shadow of death, given over to follow their own evil ways, and to be led captive by the devil at his will. But in the apostolic age the case was altogether changed; the Jews being cast off from God; and the Gentiles being admitted into covenant with him, and made partakers of far higher privileges than were ever accorded to the Jews. There is, in fact, scarcely any comparison between the mercies vouchsafed to us, and those of which God’s ancient people partook: so true is it, that “we, who once were last, are now first; and the Jews, who were once first, are last.” In fact, that is now fulfilled which our blessed Lord foretold, that multitudes now “come to him from every quarter of the globe, to sit down with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, in the kingdom of heaven; whilst the children of the kingdom, the poor infatuated Jews, are cast into outer darkness, where is weeping, and wailing, and gnashing of teeth [Note: Matthew 8:11-12.].”]

2. In their civil station—

[The rich and great and noble appear to have immense advantages for heaven, because they can employ a great portion of their time in heavenly pursuits; whilst the poor, who are necessitated to earn their bread by some earthly occupation, have but little time to spare for the acquisition of divine knowledge. But “the rich, for the most part, are too wise in their own conceit [Note: Proverbs 28:11.]” to suspect their own ignorance, or to submit to divine teaching: and they have such a fulness and sufficiency of earthly gratifications, that they are not disposed to seek after happiness in things above. The poor, on the contrary, are more willing to receive instruction, and to listen to advice in relation to spiritual and eternal riches. This has been the case in all ages. In our Lord’s day, it was said, “Have any of the Rulers and of the Pharisees believed on him?” But “the common people heard him gladly.” In like manner, St. Paul says of those in his day, “Not many mighty, not many noble, are called.” And in every age, St. James informs us, “God hath chosen the poor of this world to be rich in faith, and heirs of his kingdom [Note: James 2:5.].”]

3. In their intellectual attainments—

[Certainly knowledge, beyond every thing else, elevates man above his fellows. Yet, when his aspect is viewed in reference to religion, it is frequently found rather hostile, than friendly, to heavenly pursuits. Hence it is said, in a fore-cited passage, that “not many wise men after the flesh are called; but, instead of them, the foolish, the weak, and the base [Note: 1 Corinthians 1:26-28.].” Indeed, God has said, “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and will bring to nothing the understanding of the prudent. Where is the wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the disputer of this world? Hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world [Note: 1 Corinthians 1:19-20.]?” The truth is, that the wisdom of this world is so deeply impregnated with pride, that it cannot submit to the humiliating doctrines of the Gospel [Note: 1 Corinthians 2:14.]. “The wisdom of God is foolishness with man: and the wisdom of man is foolishness with God [Note: 1 Corinthians 1:21-25.]:” and the only way for any man to become truly wise, is to become a fool in his own estimation, and to receive with child-like simplicity every word that God hath spoken [Note: 1 Corinthians 3:18-20.]. And if any think it hard that such contempt should be poured on human wisdom, let him know that our blessed Saviour saw nothing in it but ground for praise and thanksgiving: “I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes; even so, Father, for so it seemed good in thy sight [Note: Matthew 11:25-26.].”]

4. In their moral habits—

[These, above all, we should suppose to be favourable to the reception of the Gospel. But really experience is far from confirming this sentiment: for the Scribes and Pharisees were externally moral; yet did publicans and harlots enter into the kingdom of heaven before them [Note: Matthew 21:31.].” “The former justified God, being baptized with the baptism of John: whereas the latter rejected the counsel of God against themselves, being not baptized of him [Note: Luke 7:29-30.].” And, as the fruit of these different dispositions, the Pharisee, who thought himself righteous, and despised others, went from the Divine presence with all his guilt upon him, whilst the self-condemning Publican was justified from all his sins [Note: Luke 18:10-14.]. Where can we find a more impious character than Manasseh? or one more bitter than Saul? or one in a more desperate condition than the dying thief? Yet all these found mercy of the Lord, that “in them, as in the chief of sinners, God might be the more glorified [Note: 1 Timothy 1:15-16.].” And thus it frequently is at this day: “where sin has abounded, grace much more abounds; that as sin has reigned unto death, so grace might reign through righteousness unto eternal life, through Jesus Christ our Lord [Note: Romans 5:20-21.].”

Thus, in all these respects, are our Lord’s words fully verified; not only the Gentiles occupying a higher station than God’s ancient people; but the poor, the illiterate, and the depraved being raised to a participation of God’s kingdom and glory, to a far greater extent than the rich, the learned, and the moral: so true is it still, as in former ages, that “God raiseth up the poor out of the dust, and lifteth up the beggar from the dunghill, to set them among princes, and to make them inherit the throne of glory [Note: 1 Samuel 2:8.].”]

Having endeavoured to elucidate the words before us, I will now,

II. Suggest the improvement which, in my judgment the subject calls for—

I cannot conceive any subject more calculated,

1. To put down presumption—

[Let any person be as elevated as he will in national privileges, or civil station, or intellectual attainments, or moral habits, yea, I will add also, in religious experience; let him be the admiration of all around him; yet will I say, that if he be lifted up with pride, he will fall into the condemnation of the devil; and, from being the first in human estimation, he will become the last in Divine acceptance. Look at Demas: so eminent was he in the estimation of St. Paul, that twice did the Apostle join him with St. Luke, in his salutations to the saints: “Salute Lucas and Demas.” Yet we find this man at last forsaking the way of godliness, and turning back to a state of utter worldliness and carnality [Note: 2 Timothy 4:10.]. In the book of Job we read of many “whose excellency mounts up to the heavens, and their head reaches to the clouds; and yet, at last, they perish like their own dung; and they who have seen them are led, with a mixture of doubt and lamentation, to say, Where is he [Note: Job 20:6-7.]?” And where shall we find a Church in which such instances have not occurred, to the disgrace of true religion, and to the grief of all who held fast their profession? I say then to every soul of man, however advanced in piety he may appear, “Be not high-minded, but fear.” Yea, though he may have attained the eminence of Paul himself, I will bid him “keep his body under, and bring it into subjection; lest, after having preached to others, he himself should become a cast-away [Note: 1 Corinthians 9:27.].”]

2. To prevent despair—

[Let not any one tell me that his guilt is too great to be forgiven, or his depravity too inveterate to be subdued. I will grant that the disadvantages under which a man may labour may be so great as to render his conversion, in all human appearance, impossible; yet will I say, that though he be the last, yet may he become the first. What cannot He do, who formed the universe out of nothing, and reduced the chaos to the order and beauty in which we behold it? If only we remember who it is that is engaged in our behalf, we shall never despond. For what is there that God cannot effect? If there ever was any thing to be despaired of, it was, that Jesus should be restored to life after he had been committed to the tomb. But did not “the stone which the builders had disallowed become the head-stone of the corner?” and shall not He who was “crucified through weakness” “put all his enemies under his feet?” Then I say, let no man entertain desponding thoughts, as though he were beyond the reach of mercy: for however “far off we may be from God, we may be brought nigh by the blood of Christ.”Only let us call on Him “who quickeneth the dead, and calleth those things which be not as though they were;” and let us, “against hope, believe in hope [Note: Romans 4:17-18.];” and, like Abraham, we shall be made “friends of God,” yea, and sit down, at last, with Abraham in the kingdom of our God, for ever and ever.]


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Bibliography
Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/luke-13.html. 1832.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 13:30. Comp. on Matthew 19:30; Matthew 20:16.

εἰσίν] (before the establishment of the kingdom; ἔσονται) after it, in the kingdom.

ἔσχατοι] i.e. those who have not become believers till very late (as such, born heathens, Luke 13:29);

ἔσονται πρῶτοι] Members of the first rank in the kingdom of Messiah. The originality of this maxim, uttered in several forms and in various connections, is to be claimed exclusively for no particular place.


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Bibliography
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-13.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 13:30. ἰδοὺ εἰσὶνκαί εἰσι, behold, there areand there are) The present with emphasis, in antithesis to the future: Luke 13:29; Luke 13:24.— εἰσὶν ἔσχατοι, there are last) This has reference to Luke 13:28-29. The absence of the article makes the whole assertion in the sentence indefinite, and denotes that there is to be an interchange in the relative positions of some, though not of all, of the first and of the last, not that there is to be an account taken of both in the mass without discrimination: For those coming from the four quarters of the world shall recline at the banquet with the fathers and the prophets, not the latter with them (the former). See Matthew 8:11.— εἰσὶ πρῶτοι, there are first) This is to be referred to Luke 13:24, et seqq.


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-13.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

This is a sentence which our Saviour often made use of, and not always to the same purpose. See Poole on "Matthew 19:30". See Poole on "Matthew 20:16". See Poole on "Mark 10:31". As to the sense of them here, it is plain. Our Saviour here foretells the conversion of the Gentiles; but yet I do not take the Gentiles to be all who are intended under the notion of the last, but divers others also. Men who, both in their opinion of themselves, and in reality with respect to privilege, are the first, whether in respect of gifts, or office, or the means of grace, or profession, will many of them be the last, that is, furthest off from the kingdom of God; and many who are the last, upon these accounts will in the day of judgment be first, that is, appear so, as having more of the favour of God, and be so, taken to heaven, when the others shall be cast to hell, Matthew 11:20-24.


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 13:30". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-13.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Last-first-first-last; these solemn words have a twofold fulfilment. First, in this world: the scribes and Pharisees stood first in God’s kingdom as to their outward position and privileges; but by rejecting Christ, they made themselves last, while the publicans and sinners and the gentile nations, who they despised, by receiving him, became first; and so it has often been since. Secondly, in the world to come, where many that have stood high in reputation and outward privileges will be thrust down to hell, and many that have here been despised and persecuted will be exalted to glory everlasting.


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Bibliography
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-13.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

30. καὶ ἰδού. The phrase sometimes implies ‘strange as you may think it.’ It occurs 23 times in St Matthew , 16 in St Luke; but not in St Mark.

εἰσὶν ἔσχατοι οἳ ἔσονται πρῶτοι. Our Lord used this proverbial expression more than once. Matthew 19:30. It had, besides its universal truthfulness, a special bearing on His own time. “The publicans and the harlots go into the Kingdom of God before you,” Matthew 21:31. “The Gentiles, which followed not after righteousness, have attained to righteousness,” Romans 9:30.

“There above (on earth)

How many hold themselves for mighty kings,

Who here like swine shall wallow in the mire,

Leaving behind them horrible dispraise.”

DANTE, Inferno.


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Luke 13:30". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-13.html. 1896.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“And behold, there are last who will be first, and there are first who will be last.”

For at that final day everything will be turned upside down. The humble and rejected will be exalted. Those at the back of the picture will be brought to the front. Those who were God’s ‘nothings’ will become great. Those at the back of the queue will be brought to the front. While those who saw themselves as hugely important will find themselves ignored and left out. Those who sought the first place will be given the last. As the parallel in Luke 13:32-33 demonstrates, the great king of the Jews (of Galilee and Peraea) will come to nothing (this is not stated but is clearly implied), while the dishonoured prophet Who is going up to Jerusalem to be rejected and to die will ascend the throne of Heaven.


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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-13.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

30. Last… first—The Gentiles, which were last, have become first; the reverse has been the history of the Jews. And so in the following chapters (14-16) the Pharisees and Publicans are reversed from first to last.


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-13.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The people who are last in this context probably refer to Gentiles whom the Jews regarded as least likely to enter the kingdom (cf. Matthew 19:30; Matthew 20:16; Mark 10:31). The ones who are first were the Jews. They considered themselves to be superior to Gentiles in many ways. They were also the first and the foremost objects of Jesus" ministry.


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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-13.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 13:30. See on Matthew 19:30; Matthew 20:16. Here the saying seems to be applied to the ingathering of the guests, just spoken of; not simply to the Jews and Gentiles as such, but to individuals and churches and nations all through the ingathering. For example: the church at Jerusalem and her Gentile off-shoots, the Oriental churches. Modern history furnishes many instances.


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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-13.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 13:30. The same remark applies to this saying. As it stands here it refers to Jews as the first who become last, and to Gentiles as the last who become first, and the distinction between first and last is not one of degree, but absolute = within and without.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-13.html. 1897-1910.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And, behold, there are last which shall be first, and there are first which shall be last.

No JFB commentary on this verse.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-13.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(30) And, behold, there are last . . .—See Note on Matthew 19:30. In point of time, it may be noticed, this is the first utterance of the great law that God’s judgment reverses man’s. When it was uttered in reference to the young ruler, it was but a fresh application of the wider law. Here the application is primarily national. Israel had been the first of nations, but it should become, in its outward fortunes, the last, and the heathen who had been “without hope and without God in the world” (Ephesians 2:12) should gain the high pre-eminence of being the heirs of the kingdom. The individual application of the words grows naturally, however, out of the national.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-13.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And, behold, there are last which shall be first, and there are first which shall be last.
Matthew 3:9,10; 8:11,12; 19:30; 20:16; 21:28-31; Mark 10:31

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-13.html.

The Bible Study New Testament

Then those who are now last will be first. The Gentiles had not shared in the Law. The Jew thought the Gentile had no hope, while he himself was sure of salvation. See note on Matthew 20:16.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 13:30". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-13.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Lectionary Calendar
Saturday, May 30th, 2020
Eve of Pentecost
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