Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 13:31

Just at that time some Pharisees approached, saying to Him, "Go away, leave here, for Herod wants to kill You."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Herod;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Persecution;   Rulers;   Scofield Reference Index - Parables;   Thompson Chain Reference - Antipas;   Herods of the New Testament;  
Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Pharisees;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Antipas;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Gospels;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Luke, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Death of Christ;   Herod;   Herod ;   Palestine;   Scorn;   Self-Control;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Herod, Family of;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Fain;   Get;   Herod;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Christianity in Its Relation to Judaism;   New Testament;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Depart hence, etc. - It is probable that the place from which Christ was desired to depart was Galilee or Perea; for beyond this Herod had no jurisdiction. It can scarcely mean Jerusalem, though it appears from Luke 23:7, that Herod Antipas was there at the time of our Lord's crucifixion.

Herod will kill thee - Lactantius says that this Herod was the person who chiefly instigated the Jewish rulers to put our Lord to death: Tum Pontius, et illorum clamoribus, et Herodis tetrarchae instigatione, metuentis ne regno pelleretur, victus est: - fearing lest himself should be expelled from the kingdom, if Christ should be permitted to set up his. See Lact. Inst. Div. lib. iv. c. xviii., and Bishop Pearce on Luke 23:7.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-13.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Came certain of thee Pharisees - Their coming to him in this manner would have the appearance of friendship, as if they had conjectured or secretly learned that it was Herod‘s intention to kill him. Their suggestion had much appearance of probability. Herod had killed John. He knew that Jesus made many disciples, and was drawing away many of the people. He was a wicked man, and he might be supposed to fear the presence of one who had so strong a resemblance to John, whom he had slain. It might seem probable, therefore, that he intended to take the life of Jesus, and this might appear as a friendly hint to escape him. Yet it is more than possible that Herod might have sent these Pharisees to Jesus. Jesus was eminently popular, and Herod might not dare openly to put him to death; yet he desired his removal, and for this purpose he sent these people, as if in a friendly way, to advise him to retire. This was probably the reason why Jesus called him a fox.

Herod - Herod Antipas, a son of Herod the Great. He ruled over Galilee and Perea, and wished Jesus to retire beyond these regions. See the notes at Luke 3:1.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-13.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

In that very hour there came certain Pharisees, saying to him, Get thee out, and go hence: for Herod would fain kill thee. And he said unto them, Go and say to that fox, Behold, I cast out demons and perform cures today and tomorrow, and on the third day I am perfected. Nevertheless I must go on my way today and tomorrow and the day following: for it cannot be that a prophet perish out of Jerusalem.

THE WARNING FROM THE PHARISEES

Jesus was somewhere in the area of Trans-Jordan, or possibly still in Galilee, both being within the political jurisdiction of Herod; but the idea is rejected which would view this blunt word from the Pharisees as anything but a lie. As Russell said, "They were not telling the truth. There was no reason for thinking that Herod, although a man of base character, wished to kill Jesus."[32] When Jesus finally appeared before Herod Antipas (Luke 23:11), that ruler initiated no action against him, except to mock him and send him back to Pilate; and by including this in his record, Luke documented the Pharisees' falsehood. There is no ground whatever for supposing, as Geldenhuys thought, that "The Pharisees' warning may have been perfectly sincere and prompted by a concern for Jesus' safety."[33]

What the Pharisees really intended, of course, was to frighten Jesus into returning to Jerusalem, where of course, the Pharisees planned themselves to kill him.

Go tell that fox ... The Greek word used here means, literally, "she-fox," an epithet described by Spence as "perhaps the bitterest and most contemptuous name ever given by the pitiful Master to any of the sons of men."[34] By choice of a feminine word, Jesus might have intended a reference to Herodias, Herod's consort, whose wicked influence had caused the murder of John the Baptist. Childers noted that the Greek word for "fox" is basically a feminine noun, and that for that reason it cannot be known that the female sex was intended; "but at least it shows that Greek-speaking people regarded a fox as the opposite of bold and courageous."[35] Jesus' epithet evaluated the wicked Herod as a small, weak, sly, and cunning character, unworthy of honor and respect.

Today and tomorrow, and the third day ... This was relatively but a short while; and, by these words, Christ was saying that he did not plan to be in Herod's territory very long anyway. Although the Lord would not be frightened into leaving, his plans already called for his progression on to Jerusalem.

It cannot be that a prophet perish out of Jerusalem ... Jesus fully knew that going to Jerusalem would not procure safety for himself. On the other hand, he had repeatedly prophesied that his death would occur in that city; and, by these words, Christ signaled the Pharisees that he knew all about their wicked plans to murder him. The construction of his words here has the effect of saying that our Lord enjoyed greater safety anywhere other than in Jerusalem.

[32] John William Russell, op. cit., p. 174.

[33] Norval Geldenhuys, op. cit., p. 382.

[34] H. D. M. Spence, op. cit., p. 6.

[35] Charles L. Childers, op. cit., p. 545.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-13.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

The same day there came certain of the Pharisees,.... Who dwelt in Galilee, for they were in all parts of the country: these being nettled and filled with indignation at Christ, because of the parables he had that day delivered, the miracles he had wrought, and the several awful and striking things which dropped from him, and which they knew respected them; contrived to get rid of him, by frightening him with a design of Herod's, to take away his life, should he continue there: for this seems to be rather a stratagem of theirs, than of Herod's; though it may he, that Herod might take this method, and make use of these men in this way, to terrify him; fearing to lay hold on him, and put him to death; partly because of the people, and partly because of the remaining uneasiness and terror of his mind, for taking off the head of John the Baptist:

saying, get thee out and depart hence; in all haste, as soon as possible:

for Herod will kill thee: he is resolved upon it, he has formed a design, and will quickly take methods to execute it. This was Herod the tetrarch, of Galilee; from whence we learn, that Christ was as yet in Galilee, though he was journeying towards Jerusalem, Luke 13:22 for Herod's jurisdiction reached no further than Galilee: this was either a device of Herod's, or of the Pharisees, or of both, to get rid of Christ in the easiest manner.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-13.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

9 The same day there came certain of the Pharisees, saying unto him, Get thee out, and depart hence: for Herod will kill thee.

(9) We must go forward in regards to our calling, through the midst of terrors, whether they be real or imagined.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-13.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Luke 13:31-35. Message to Herod.

and depart hence — and “go forward,” push on. He was on His way out of Perea, east of Jordan, and in Herod‘s dominions, “journeying towards Jerusalem” (Luke 13:22). Haunted by guilty fears, probably, Herod wanted to get rid of Him (see on Mark 6:14), and seems, from our Lord‘s answer, to have sent these Pharisees, under pretense of a friendly hint, to persuade Him that the sooner He got beyond Herod‘s jurisdiction the better it would be for His own safety. Our Lord saw through both of them, and sends the cunning ruler a message couched in dignified and befitting irony.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-13.html. 1871-8.

People's New Testament

There came certain of the Pharisees. Their object was to frighten Jesus away, and hence they asserted that Herod, Herod Antipas, would kill him. He was the tetrarch of Galilee and ruler of the country beyond the Jordan, who slew John the Baptist. See notes on Matthew 2:1.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
Johnson, Barton W. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "People's New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pnt/luke-13.html. 1891.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

In that very hour (εν αυτηι τηι ωραιen autēi tēi hōrāi). Luke‘s favourite notation of time.

Pharisees (ΠαρισαιοιPharisaioi). Here we see the Pharisees in a new role, warning Jesus against the machinations of Herod, when they are plotting themselves.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-13.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Day

The best texts read hour.

Will kill ( θέλει ἀποκτεῖναι )

As in so many cases the A. V. renders as the future of the verb to kill; whereas there are two distinct verbs; to will or determine, and to kill. The meaning is, Herod willeth or is determined to kill thee. Rev., would fain, seems rather feeble.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-13.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

The same day there came certain of the Pharisees, saying unto him, Get thee out, and depart hence: for Herod will kill thee.

Herod is minded to kill thee — Possibly they gave him the caution out of good will.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-13.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

In that very hour there came certain Pharisees, saying to him, Get thee out, and go hence: for Herod would fain kill thee1.

  1. In that very hour there came certain Pharisees, saying to him, Get thee out, and go hence: for Herod would fain kill thee. This shows that Jesus was in the territory of Herod Antipas, and hence probably in Perea. The Pharisees, no doubt, wished to scare Jesus that they might exult over his fright. We might suppose, too, that their words were untrue, were it not that Jesus sends a reply to Herod. Herod long desired to see Jesus (Luke 9:9; Luke 23:8), but it was not likely that he desired to put him to death. He was, doubtless, glad enough to get Jesus out of his territory, lest he might foment an uprising, and to this end he employed this strategy of sending messengers to warn Jesus under the guise of friendship.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
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J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-13.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

They said this not as friends, but in a hostile and threatening manner.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-13.html. 1878.

Scofield's Reference Notes

Herod

See margin ref., (See Scofield "Matthew 14:1").

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 13:31". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-13.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

31 The same day there came certain of the Pharisees, saying unto him, Get thee out, and depart hence: for Herod will kill thee.

Ver. 31. For Herod will kill thee]

" Tu vero Herodes sanguinolente timo." (Beza, Ep.)

If Herod or these Pharisees had been as wise as Pilate’s wife, they would never have meddled with that just man.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-13.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 13:31. There came certain of the Pharisees, From the known disposition of the Pharisees, who were always the professed enemies of Christ, as well as from his answer, it is more than probable that their concern for his safety was feigned, and that their real design was to intimidate him, and make him flee into Judea, not doubting that the haughty priests would fall upon some method of putting him to death. Herod too seems to have been in the plot; he now began to take umbrage at Christ's fame and authority, fearing that it might occasion him some embarrassment, either with his people or with the Romans; but he dreaded to make an attempt on his life, remembering the agonies of mind that he had suffered on account of the Baptist's murder. Probably therefore, he insidiously sent the Pharisees to him, with the message in the present verse, Get thee out, and depart hence, for Herod is determined to kill thee. Such is the force of the original; and in this view there is a peculiar propriety in our Lord's reply, and in his calling Herod a fox, rather than a lion, wolf, or bear. See the note on Matthew 3:7.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-13.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

It may seem strange that the Pharisees, who had no kindness for our Saviour, should come here and acquaint him with a danger that he was in from Herod: Get thee hence, for Herod will kill thee. It is probable they had a design to drive him out of the country, because his reputation was so great amongst the people, who were admirers of his person, hearers of his doctrine, and witnesses of his miracles. But what intention soever they had in acquainting Christ with his danger, it is very evident that our Saviour slighted it, by the messsage which he sent to Herod; Go and tell that fox. Where we must not suppose, that our Lord did fix this name of fox upon Herod as an opprobrious title, thereby reflecting the least dishonor upon him as a king; but it was as a prophet, to let him know, that being about his Father's work, he feared neither his power nor his policy; neither his cruelty nor his craft; and that nothing should take him off from finishing the work of man's redemption.

Learn hence, that when God calls forth any of his servants to any special service for him, all the combined power and policy of the prince of darkeness and his instruments, shall never be able to hinder them, until they have finished their course, and done the service which God designed: I must work today, and tomorrow, and the day following; as if Christ had said, "Let Herod know that my time is not in his hand, and, as to this matter, I am not under his command or power; however long my work will be finished, and then I shall be perfected."

Observe here, that to impose this ignominious but agreeable name on Herod, is not contrary to the command, not to speak evil of the ruler of the people; it being the office of a prophet, not to spare kings when they reprove their offences. Accordingly Christ here uses his prophetic call and power, in giving this tyrant a name so suitable to his actions: Go and tell that fox, from me, a prophet sent of God, and therefore authorized so to style him, that I am hastening to Jerusalem to lay down my life there, not fearing to be killed by him in the way; for it cannot be that a prophet perish out of Jerusalem, where the Sanhedrin sit, who are to pass judgment upon me. Dr. Whitby.

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Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-13.html. 1700-1703.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

31.] ἐν αὐτῇ τῇ ὥρᾳ is not necessarily definite.

These Pharisees appear to have been sent by Herod for the purpose of getting rid of Jesus out of his jurisdiction. Considering his character, it is hardly possible that he should really have wished to kill one who was so popular;—he refused to do so when Jesus was in his power afterwards in Jerusalem;—but, as great multitudes were now following Him about, and superstitious fears, as we know, agitated Herod, he wished to be quit of Him, and took this means of doing so. I think this view is necessary to justify the epithet applied to Herod, which certainly implies cunning on his part. Stier thinks the Pharisees invented the tale about Herod: but then how can the epithet applied to him be explained? I cannot for a moment believe, as he does, that our Lord saw through the lie of the Pharisees, and yet adopted it, meaning the ἀλώπηξ to signify themselves. “That Jesus in a public discourse uses such an expression of the ruler of his country, is not to be judged of by the manners, and ways of speech, of our times. The free-spokenness of the ancient world, which we meet with especially in the Hebrew prophets, allowed such strong expressions, without any thing peculiarly offensive being found in them.” Bleek.

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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/luke-13.html. 1863-1878.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

ff

Luke 13:31 ff. as far as Luke 13:33 peculiar to Luke from the source of his narrative of the journey.

According to Luke 17:11, the incident occurred in Galilee, with which Luke 9:51 ff. (see on the passage) is not inconsistent.

That the Pharisees did not merely give out on pretence their statement in reference to Antipas (Theophylact, Euthymius Zigabenus, Maldonatus, and others, including Olshausen and Ebrard), but actually had instructions from him, because he himself wished to be rid of the dreaded miracle-worker (Luke 9:7; Luke 9:9) out of his dominions, is plain from τῇ ἀλώπεκι ταύτῃ, Luke 13:32, whereby is declared His penetration of the subtle cunning(167) of Herod (not of the Pharisees); in the contrary case, Jesus would have had no ground for characterizing him just as He did, and that too in the consciousness of His higher prophetic and regal dignity. But that Herod used even the enemies of Jesus for this purpose was not unwisely calculated, because he could rely upon them, since they also, on their part, must be glad to see Him removed out of their district, and because the cunning of the Pharisees for the execution of such like purposes was at all events better known to him than were the frequent exposures which they had experienced at the hands of Jesus. On the proverbial ἀλώπηξ, comp. Pind. Pyth. ii. 141; Plat. Pol. ii. p. 365 C and thereupon, Stallbaum; Plut. Sol. 30. Comp. ἀλωπεκίζειν in Aristoph. Vesp. 1241; also κίναδος, Dem. 281. 22, 307. 23; Soph. Aj. 103.

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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/luke-13.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 13:31. ἡρώδης, Herod) The Pharisees, in saying this, did not say what was decidedly untrue: for Herod did earn the appellation, fox; and Simonius suspects that he was so called by many. But Herod was wishing that this worker of miracles, whom he suspected to be John, should be removed as far as possible from him [For which reason he the more frequently drove Him from place to place: Matthew 4:12; Matthew 14:1, comparing Luke 13:13.—Harm., p. 407]: and the same object was the aim of the Pharisees: hence both conspired together against Jesus. Again, on the other hand, Herod does not seem in serious earnest to have wished to kill Jesus; for if he was struck with fear after having killed John, ch. Luke 9:7-8, he could not but have been struck with more violent fear had he killed Jesus; but he tried to agitate Jesus (by alarming Him, and to thrust Him out of his country, under the pretext of his territorial right (comp. Amos 7:12, [where Amaziah uses the same policy towards the prophet]), and by means of threats derived from that plea, which the Pharisees reported to Him, as if in the way of friendly admonition, not in Herod’s words, but in their own words, and perhaps with exaggerations of their own invention. Therefore Jesus replies to both in accordance with the real state of the case, not being terrified by anything (in any respect). He calls Herod a fox, employing an epithet accurately characterizing him, on account of his cunning and hypocritical cowardice (comp. ch. Luke 9:7), inasmuch as he was throwing out threats which were but a feint, and declaring that He is not to be deterred by those threats from the performing of miracles: but, at the same time, He upbraids the persons who announced the tidings of Herod’s threats, as also the whole of Jerusalem, with their ungrateful and blood-thirty spirit: Luke 13:33-34. Herod was a fox, a persecutor on a comparatively small scale, compared with Jerusalem, the great persecutor (‘persecutrix’).— θέλει σε ἀποκτεῖναι, wishes to kill Thee) being irritated perhaps with the act of Pilate, mentioned Luke 13:1.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-13.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 31-33. It is plain from this text, that our Saviour was at this time in Galilee, for that was the tetrarchy or province of Herod Antipas, who is the Herod here mentioned. Whether these Pharisees came of their own heads, or as sent by Herod, is not so plain, nor so well agreed by interpreters. If they came of their own heads, it is certain they came not out of kindness, for the whole history of the gospel lets us know, that the Pharisees had no kindness for Christ, but were his most implacable enemies, and continually consulting how to destroy him; but they either came to scare him out of Galilee, whose repute was so great, and who did them so much mischief there, or to drive him into the trap which they had laid for him in Judea. But it is most probable that they came as secretly sent by Herod, who though of himself he be reported to be of no bloody disposition, yet upon the Pharisees’ continual solicitations might be persuaded to send them on this errand, choosing rather cunningly to scare him out of his province, than by violence to fall upon him. This opinion looks more probable, because, Luke 13:32, our Saviour sends them back with a message to Herod, Go ye, and tell that fox. Herod had gained himself no reputation amongst the Jews, by his murdering John the Baptist, whom the Jews generally valued as a prophet; and probably seeing our Saviour exceeding him in popular applause, he was not willing to augment the odium which already lay upon him for that fact; yet, to gratify the Pharisees, (many of which were in his province), he was willing, if he could effect it cleverly, and without noise, to he quit of Christ, especially considering (as we before heard) he had an opinion that he was John the Baptist risen from the dead, or the soul of John the Baptist in another body; and possibly: he could not tell what might be the effect of his ghost so haunting his province. It is certain, that either he, or the Pharisees, or both, had a mind to have him gone some where else, to which purpose this message is brought to him. Our Saviour, either discerning Herod’s craft in this thing, or having observed the craft he used in the whole management of his government, that he might keep favour both with the Roman emperor and with the Jews, bids them, Go and tell that fox. I do not much value their critical observation, who observe that it is not alwpeki eceinh, but, tauth, that is, this fox; from whence they would observe that our Saviour might mean the Pharisees, not Herod; nor is there any need of it to excuse our Saviour from the violation of that law of God, Exodus 22:28, Thou shalt not revile the gods, nor curse the ruler of thy people; which law Paul reflected on, Acts 23:5, and pleads ignorance for his calling Ananias a whited wall. For we shall observe that the prophets all along (being immediately sent from God) took a further liberty than any others, in severely reproving kings and princes. Elijah tells Ahab it was he that troubled Israel; the prophets call the rulers of the Jews, rulers of Sodom, and princes of Gomorrah, &c. But Christ may be allowed a liberty neither lawful nor decent for other persons, not though they were prophets. But what is the message which Christ sends by these Pharisees?

Behold, I cast out devils, and I do cures today and tomorrow, and the third day I shall be perfected. Tell him, saith he, what I am doing; I am freeing his subjects from molestations by evil spirits, and the encumbrances of many diseases. What do I do worthy of death? I have but a little time to trouble him, for in a little time I must die, which is that which he means by being perfected: it is plain that those words today, and tomorrow, and the third day, must not be taken strictly, for Christ lived more than three days after this. If this will not satisfy him, tell him, saith our Saviour, that

I must walk today, and tomorrow, and the day following. I know that, as to this thing, I am not under his command or power, I must walk, & c.; my days are not in his hands, and I know that he cannot kill me,

for it cannot be that a prophet perish out of Jerusalem. Jerusalem is the place where I must die, not Galilee; the sanhedrim sits at Jerusalem, who alone can take cognizance of the case of false prophets, and Jerusalem is the place where the people must fill up the measure of their iniquities by spilling my blood. Upon this our Saviour breaketh out into a sad lamentation of the case of that once holy city, the praise of the whole earth.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 13:31". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-13.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

удались отсюда Ирод Антипа правил Галилеей и Переей (см. пояснение к Мф. 2:22). Возможно, Христос или приближался к Перее или уже служил там (см. пояснение к ст. 22). Фарисеи, сами не будучи друзьями Ирода, возможно, предупредили Христа в надежде, что угроза насилия со стороны Ирода или заставит Его молчать, или вернет Его в Иудею, где Он будет под контролем Синедриона.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-13.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

Herod’s malignant warning, and the Lord’s reply, Luke 13:31-34.

31.The same day—The day on which the question of Luke 13:23 was answered; namely, the first of the two closing days of the Peraean ministry.

Certain of the Pharisees—Herodian partizans among the Jews, flatterers and tools at the court of Herod Antipas. (See note on Matthew 22:16.) They were Pharisees in profession, but Sadducees in life and practice. It is this same sort of men, if not this very set, who appear in Luke 20:19-20. They appear here as emissaries sent from Herod to Jesus.

For Herod— Jesus in Peraea was within the dominions of Herod, and not far from that very fortress of Machaerus where John had been beheaded by this same Herod Antipas. For the life and character of Herod Antipas, and for the superstitious dread he entertained of Jesus, consult our notes on Matthew 14:1-2.

Will kill thee—It is evident that Antipas, equally infidel and superstitious, was actually at the present time afraid of Jesus; equally dreading to have him in his dominions, or to touch him with violence, so as to incur the odium of murdering a second holy man. He therefore sends these spies to frighten Jesus out of his dominions.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-13.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘In that very hour there came certain Pharisees, saying to him, “Get you out, and go from here, for Herod desires to kill you.” ’

We do not know how genuine this warning was. Perhaps these were Pharisees who admired Him. But it may simply be that they hoped by this means to frighten Him off and prevent Him from carrying on with His work. Or they may even have hoped to drive Him into Judea where they had more influence and could get rid of Him themselves. Or Herod might have asked them to warn Him off (his conscience was still burdened by what he had done to John the Baptiser).

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-13.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

This incident followed the former one chronologically. Therefore it is probable that Jesus" words about Jews not entering the kingdom and Gentiles entering it had caused the Pharisees to gnash their teeth in anger against Him. Luke"s presentation of the Pharisees has been consistently antagonistic, so it is reasonable to assume that their suggestion had a hidden motive. They may have wanted to scare Jesus into retreating rather than continuing on toward Jerusalem where Herod awaited Him. Or perhaps Herod was using the Pharisees to pass on a death threat to Jesus.

Did Herod Antipas really want to kill Jesus? He kept trying to see Jesus ( Luke 9:9), and when he finally did he was very glad for the opportunity hoping that Jesus would perform a miracle ( Luke 23:8). However he proceeded to mock Jesus and to treat Him with contempt ( Luke 23:11). It appears that the Pharisees were overstating Herod"s hostility at this time. Their warning posed a temptation for Jesus to depart from His Father"s will for Him, but He did not yield to it.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/luke-13.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 13:31. In that very hour. This is the correct translation.

Certain Pharisees. They may have been sent by Herod, and were the agents best adapted for his purpose, because their party was in opposition to him. Our Lord’s reply intimates this. Herod may not have wished to kill Jesus, but the desire, now to see Him and now to get Him out of his territory, agrees entirely with the character of that ruler. To threaten thus without really purposing to carry out the threat, to use Pharisees, his opponents, to report the threat, is the cunning of ‘that fox.’

Depart hence. Our Lord was probably in Perea, part of Herod’s territory, and that part too in which John the Baptist had been put to death. Others infer from chap. Luke 17:11, that He was still in Galilee, but this we consider highly improbable.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-13.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 13:31. : Luke 17:11 shows that Lk. did not attach critical importance to this incident as a cause of Christ’s final departure from Galilee.— : was this a lie, an inference, a message sent by Herod in order to intimidate, or a fact which had somehow come to the knowledge of the reporters? It is impossible to ascertain. The answer of Jesus seems to imply that He regarded the Pharisees as messengers, and also innocent tools of the crafty king. But He answers according to the ex facie character of the message, that of friends warning against a foe, while probably having His own thoughts as to where the craft and the enmity lay. The one thing certain is that there was low cunning somewhere. The king was using the Pharisees, or the Pharisees the king, or perhaps they were both playing the same game. Possibly the evangelist viewed the Pharisees as friends.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-13.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

The same day = In, or on, &c. (Greek. en. App-104.) = just then.

day. LT Tr. WH R read" hour".

certain of the Pharisees = certain Pharisees.

will = wishes: i.e. means to. See App-102.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

The same day there came certain of the Pharisees, saying unto him, Get thee out, and depart hence: for Herod will kill thee.

The same day there came certain of the Pharisees, saying unto him, Get thee out, and depart hence - `Push on without delay, if thou regardest thine own safety.'

For Herod (Antipas) will kill thee, [ thelei (Greek #2309) se (Greek #4571) apokteinai (Greek #615)] - 'is minded to kill thee.' He was now on His way out of Perea, on the east side of the Jordan, and so out of Herod's dominions, "journeying toward Jerusalem" (Luke 13:22). Haunted, probably, by guilty fears, Herod wanted to get rid of Him (see the note at Mark 6:14), and seems, from our Lord's answer, to have sent these Pharisees, under pretence of a friendly hint, to persuade Him that the sooner He got beyond Herod's jurisdiction the better it would be for His own safety. Our Lord saw through both of them, and sends the cunning ruler a message couched in dignified and befitting irony.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-13.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

31. Some Pharisees came to Jesus. They intended to scare Jesus into hiding, where he could not teach people. Herod Antipas (see note on Matthew 2:1) had already killed John the Baptist.

 

 

 

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Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/luke-13.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(31) Herod will kill thee.—This is the only intimation of such a purpose, and it is, of course, a question whether the Pharisees reported what they actually knew, out of feelings more or less friendly to our Lord, or invented a false tale in order that they might get rid of His presence among them, or were sent by Herod to announce his purpose as a threat that he might be rid of it. Our Lord’s answer, “Go tell that fox . . .,” points to the last of these views as the most probable. It is true that in Luke 23:8, we are told that Herod “had desired to see Him of a long season;” but oscillations of vague curiosity and vague fears were quite in keeping with the Tetrarch’s character. Accepting the conclusion suggested in the Note on Luke 13:22, that we have here a record of our Lord’s Peræan ministry, we may probably connect the message with the fact that His journeys had brought Him near Machærus, where John had been imprisoned, and in which was one of Herod’s most stately palaces (Jos. Wars, vii. 6). Thence the Pharisees may have come with a threat, in which we may possibly trace the hand of Herodias, and which, at least, reminds us of the message sent by Jezebel to Elijah (1 Kings 19:2). St. Luke’s knowledge of the incident may have been derived from Manaen; or, as Machærus was famous for hot medicinal springs, and for herbs that had a widespread fame for special virtues (Josephus, as above), it may have been one of the places to which he was attracted by his pursuits as a physician. (See Introduction.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-13.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The same day there came certain of the Pharisees, saying unto him, Get thee out, and depart hence: for Herod will kill thee.
Get
Nehemiah 6:9-11; Psalms 11:1,2; Amos 7:12,13
Reciprocal: Nehemiah 6:11 - Should such;  Psalm 2:2 - kings;  Jeremiah 36:19 - GeneralMatthew 14:1 - Herod;  Mark 6:14 - king Herod;  Luke 3:20 - GeneralLuke 9:9 - And he;  Luke 12:49 - and;  Luke 23:7 - Herod's;  John 7:1 - walked;  John 8:20 - and no;  John 9:16 - And there;  John 11:9 - Are;  Acts 4:27 - both;  Acts 13:1 - Herod

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-13.html.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

It deserves our attention, that Christ gives the designation, daughter of Abraham, to one whose body had been enslaved by Satan during eighteen years. She was so called, not only in reference to her lineage, as all the Jews without exception gloried in this title, but because she was one of the true and actual members of the Church. Here we perceive also what Paul tells us, that some are

delivered to Satan for the destruction of the flesh, that the spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord Jesus,
(
1 Corinthians 5:5.)

And the length of time points out to us that, though the Lord does not immediately relieve our distresses, yet we ought not to despair.

It is difficult to ascertain the precise time when this happened, farther than that Christ was at that time residing in Galilee, as during the whole period of his public calling he remained longer there than in any other place. Certain persons, wishing to be considered as his friends, advise him that, if he wishes to be in safety, he should go beyond the boundaries of Herod’s jurisdiction. In what manner those who gave that advice were affected towards him we have no means of knowing; but I am strongly inclined to conjecture, that they attempted to drive him to some other place, because they saw that the greater part of the people in that place were attached to Christ, so that the Gospel was generally received. We must observe who those advisers were. Luke says that they were some of the Pharisees Now we know that that sect was not so favorable to Christ as to make it probable that those men were anxious about his life. What then? Their design was, to awaken in him such fears as would drive him to some place of concealment; for they expected that, in a short time, his authority would decline, and that his whole doctrine would vanish away. But we must also direct our attention to the first originator and contriver of this scheme, Satan; for, as he endeavored at that time to interrupt the progress of the Gospel, by terrifying the Son of God, so he constantly invents and hatches up new grounds of alarm, to strike the ministers of Christ with dismay, and to constrain them to turn aside.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:31". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-13.html. 1840-57.