Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 13:34

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those sent to her! How often I wanted to gather your children together, just as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you would not have it!
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Chickens;   God Continued...;   Hen;   Impenitence;   Israel, Prophecies Concerning;   Jerusalem;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Prophets;   Unbelief;   Thompson Chain Reference - Earnestness-Indifference;   Hen;   Solicitude;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Jerusalem;   Protection;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Manoah;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Fatherhood of God;   Grief, Grieving;   Mission;   Persecution;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Hen;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Esau;   Gospels;   Hen (2);   John, the Gospel According to;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Birds;   Chicken;   Christ, Christology;   Luke, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Gospels;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Anger (2);   Animals;   Attributes of Christ;   Authority in Religion;   Consciousness;   Death of Christ;   Discourse;   Evil (2);   Jerusalem (2);   Kenosis;   Lord's Supper. (I.);   Nature and Natural Phenomena;   Old Testament (I. Christ as Fulfilment of);   Old Testament (Ii. Christ as Student and Interpreter of).;   Parable;   Persecution;   Poet;   Pre-Existence;   Quotations (2);   Rejection (2);   Stoning (2);   Struggles of Soul;   Trinity (2);   Wing ;   Winter ;   Womanliness;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hen;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Hen;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Chicken;   Hen;   Israel;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Hen;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Birds;   Chicken;   Eschatology of the New Testament;   Gather;   Hen (2);   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Birds;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem - See the note on Matthew 23:37-39; (note), where the metaphor of the hen is illustrated from the Greek Anthology.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-13.html. 1832.

The Biblical Illustrator

Luke 13:34

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem

The Saviour’s sorrow over lost men

I.
WORDS LIKE THESE, SPOKEN AT SUCH A MOMENT, LET US SEE, AS FAR AS WORDS CAN DO, INTO THE INNERMOST OF JESUS’ HEART. They are a wonderful expression of His deep-seated desire to save from ruin the worst of men, to save the unwilling, to save to the very last.

1. If ever excess of guilt could have alienated the Saviour and steeled Him against mercy, it must have been Jerusalem’s. Her privileges had been surpassing.

2. But if sinners’ sins cannot destroy Christ’s willingness to save them, neither can their unwillingness to be saved. You thrust the outstretched arms away: they are stretched cut still. You say, “I will not”: He still says, “I will.” He would that you would; prays you to turn; waits for your turning; grieves that you will not; but watches to welcome with joy the first poor timid tokens of your heart’s relenting. Thus He maintains His Divine supremacy of love; offering to the spiritual universe the stupendous contrast of a willing God and an unwilling sinner.

3. Refusal, then, does not overbear this extraordinary desire of God to save us. Neither can delay out-weary it. On the contrary, time only tests to the utmost the sincerity of the Divine mercy. The perseverance of the Saviour is the measure of His love.

II. In the next place, THIS LANGUAGE OF THE DEPARTING SAVIOUR TELLS US HOW HE BLESSES THOSE WHO WILL BE GATHERED. Strong love like His is gentle as it is strong. Only let the mighty Lover, who made you, gather you to Himself, and you will see how He will cradle you like a mother. I read it in these words, that, when He gathers men, He gathers them to His heart. They are a cry of love. Love seeks to have the loved one near, and is ever reaching forth and calling out to draw unto itself for the joy of having what it loves. Let me say it reverently: it is the deep desire of God in our Lord Jesus Christ to bring the most impure and evil of us all into as close a relation to Himself as can be. Let us remember, the place of nearness is the place of safety. To be under the shadow of wings meant in Hebrew ears to be where mercy reigned through blood-shedding, and a gracious covenanted God guarded His faithful people. It means the same thing here. For shelter from the doom, which, for their national sins, had already sent its forewarning signs over the political horizon, Jesus called His fellow-citizens to Himself. For shelter against impending judgment overhanging every sinful soul, He calls us to repentance and to faith. It is not safety alone that by this image the Lord offers us in His tenderness. Have you not seen how, when it is night and the sky over all has spread out wings of darkness to gather all things to rest; and in the soft still gloom the airs are hushed and the birds are dumb and the beasts make no stir, but all things sleep, down to the very flowers which shut their little cups and hang their leaves in dewy rest; have you not seen how then the brood is gathered by the hen to sleep upon her breast, and be curtained over with her wings? Who does not know how they pillow there upon the down, cherished by her body’s warmth, till morning light? It is not I, it is the Lord, who says that it is so with His saved people. The soul that comes to Him finds in Him rest as well as shelter. Rest for the laden conscience in His blood; rest for the weary will in His powerful spirit; rest for the sad heart in being loved by His love and cherished in an infinite Divine comfort.

III. So far I have spoken of what He would have done had the Jerusalemites gathered at His call; WHAT HE WILL DO IF WE GATHER TO HIM. Fain would I linger here; but my text forces me to a contrast from which my soul shrinks. Its words give deeper insight still into the Redeemer’s heart. Underneath the joy of salvation it touches a fount of tears. It is, in truth, his last wail of sorrow over men who would not be saved. Remember, these are funeral words. Israel’s day is done; Israel’s hope is dead; Israel’s doom is sealed. All the toil is ended; and no huff. Farewell to merecy, for her God deserts her temple. Farewell! It is just? I know it is, most just. They have deserved it? Yes, with a thousandfold deserving. So have we all, and not one of us can blame the righteousness which condemns. But, men and brethren, love weeps when justice smites. The Lamb sorrows in His wrath. And it only makes justice the more awful when you see that it has so much of pity in it and so little of poor personal triumph or ungenerous readiness, that the Judge yearns and wails over the soul He dooms. (J. O. Dykes, D. D.)

The hen and chickens

The maternal love and courage of birds have been celebrated in the literature of all nations. Even the Mussulman admires it; witness the Moslem story of the white dove. One came before Mohammed with two fledglings tied up in a cloth, which he had taken from the wood. The mother dove had bravely followed. Mohammed commanded that the cloth should be opened; on which the dove flew down, and covered her trembling offspring with her wings. Then the prophet directed that the mother and her young should be restored unhurt to the nest in the wood, and took the opportunity to teach a good lesson--

“From Allah’s self cometh this wondrous love;

Yea, and I swear by Him who sent me here,

He is more tender than a nursing dove,

More pitiful to men than she to these.”

To appreciate the feeling of Jesus Christ for Jerusalem, we must remember how complete was His knowledge of its sin. Let it not be thought strange that the will of the people of Jerusalem should be allowed to resist and defeat the mercy of the Son of God. The whole history of the nation was one of often-repeated resistance to the will of Jehovah, and rejection of His grace. The Lord desired to save, but never would force salvation on any nation or any creature. Indeed, a forced salvation would be futile, and mercy received against one’s will could do no good. The illustration used by our Lord implied that danger was at hand. Observe a hen in the open field, happy with her chickens running about her, picking and chirping in the sunshine. Suddenly a hawk appears in the air, or some mischievous animal comes slyly over the ground. On the instant the hen calls her brood to her, covers them with her wings, and is ready for their defence. Timid enough at other times, she is brave for her chickens, and will die rather than let one of them be lost. So the Lord Jesus, perceiving the danger which hovered over Jerusalem long before the Jews were aware of it, was willing to cover and save them. So also is it in every age and every nation. He who is the Saviour of the world sees the approaching perdition of ungodly men, and is willing to deliver them. Those who come to Him He will in no wise cast out. What a simple way of salvation! And how sure and perfect the defence! When lambs are startled, they run to the ewes; the kids to the she-goats. Among the fiercest animals, the young run to their mothers for protection, and these will guard their offspring at whatever peril to themselves. But no quadruped, wild or tame, can cover her young so completely as a bird can do with her folding wings. Therefore is this last the apt illustration of the -sufficiency of Christ to save. Those who trust in Him are completely covered by His righteousness and strength. On this wise has Divine salvation always been revealed. The Psalms frequently refer to the favour and protection of Jehovah as the shadow of outstretched wings (Psalms 17:8; Psa_36:7; Psa_57:1; Psa_61:4; Psa_63:7; Psa_91:4). Our Redeemer’s lament over Jerusalem shows what His heart is toward all mankind. It is a grief to Him to have His offer of salvation slighted, a joy to have it embraced. Bow unhappy the mother-bird while any of her brood continue astray and heedless of her call! What manner of persons Christians ought to be! What joy of faith, what restfulness of love should be under the covert of His wings! What nearness, too, to one another, and what obligation to brotherly kindness! The brood are packed very closely under the hen. (D. Fraser, D. D.)

Willingness to save

I. Now, first, observe THE MANIFESTATION OF GOD TO ISRAEL WHICH THIS VERSE BRINGS OUT BEFORE OUR VIEW.

1. We observe God’s sovereignty manifested in the choice of Israel. “O Jerusalem, Jerusalem.” Why, we ask, should Jerusalem be singled out from all other nations of the earth? Why should the people of Israel receive God’s special teaching, and be made examples of His peculiar mercies? The Bible tells us that God dealt with Israel as He did not deal with any other nation on the face of the earth--that He gave them special instruction, that He communicated unto them special advantages, that their advantages were many every way, that is, in every point of view, but chiefly, because not to the Assyrians, not to the Egyptians, not to any other remarkable nation of antiquity, but to the Jews were committed the oracles of God. We can only account for this by God’s sovereignty.

2. We notice also the manifestation of God’s grace in the messages which He sent to this highly favoured people--“O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, thou that killest the prophets, and stonest them which are sent unto thee.” God’s prophets, God’s messengers, those who were specially inspired or taught by His Holy Spirit, who alone can give understanding of the counsels of God, were sent to Israel. Why? Can we trace anything in their history which made them in a special manner deserving of such a favour as this?

Nothing of the kind. Their whole history is a history of God’s lovingkindness and man’s ingratitude.

3. Observe, again, the mercy of God’s character manifested in His dealings towards them. It was not one prophet, but many, that God sent; not one messenger, but various messengers--and one after another the messengers and prophets were ill-treated.

4. I notice, further, God’s love--the love of God’s character in His dealings with them. For what was His revealed purpose towards the children of Israel when He sent to them the prophets, and gave them instruction as to His will? It was to gather their children together as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings!--to gather them together, to be unto them protection and safety.

5. Further, God’s unchangeableness was manifested in His dealings with Israel. Observe the language of the Saviour, “How often would I have gathered thy children!” It was not one or two manifestations of God’s grace which Israel had received, but many. Every repetition of His mercy is a proof of His unchangeableness.

6. And yet there is a solemn view of this subject, for the verse immediately following the text speaks of God’s justice in His dealing with Israel. “Behold your house is left unto you desolate.”

7. And then observe, further, God’s faithfulness in the final issue of His dealings with Israel. “For I say unto you, ye shall not see Me henceforth, till ye shall say, “Blessed is He that cometh in the name of the Lord.” There are representatives of Israel after the flesh who shall occupy that favoured position. They shall receive the Saviour whom their forefathers rejected. And thus is it that God has, as it were, concentrated the rays of light which manifest His own character, in order that they may fall upon this single point--His willingness to save the sinful, the unworthy, the lost, and the undone.

II. But now, to pass from this, what is the special instruction which we ourselves, to whom the oracles of God are come, may derive from what we have read and examined, concerning our Lord’s willingness with reference to guilty Israel? We may learn, Christian brethren, WHAT WE HAVE TO DO WITH THE PURPOSES, WITH THE MESSAGES, AND WITH THE SALVATION OF GOD.

1. Learn what we have to do with the purposes of God. Observe, it was God’s sovereign purpose, with which His creatures could not interfere, to choose Jerusalem--to choose, that is, the nation of Israel, as a nation honoured and privileged above all other nations. We may be sure of His willingness to save, because even His sovereignty is revealed so as to set forth in prominence this willingness.

2. What have we to do, then, with the messages of God? “How shall we escape, if we neglect so great salvation?”

3. What, then, have we to do with God’s salvation, but to regard it as set forth to us in connection with our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ? Observe, He speaks in the text as One who is able to save. He claims the attributes of Deity when He says, “How often would I have gathered thy children together!” The Man Christ Jesus, in the midst of His humiliation, speaks with the authority of God. But not only is He able to save, but willing. (W. Cadman, M. A.)

Choice may become habit

It is most necessary that the “instinct of migration” shall not be resisted, for such resistance means the loss of power to emigrate. In a recent article in a scientific paper upon the “Everglades of Florida,” we read that so enfeebled have the birds that there resort become through failure to use their wings in flight that now they find it almost impossible to rise when pressed hard by their enemies. Even so is it with human souls. The “will not” becomes the “cannot.” There is a process of deterioration that ends at last in death. Slaves of choice become slaves of habit. (W. W. Wells.)

The moorhen and her young

An angler, in Hampton Court Parle, disturbed a moorhen who had just hatched, and watched her anxiety and manoeuvres to draw away her young. She would go a short distance, utter a cry, return, and seemed to lead the way for her brood to follow. Having driven her away, that he might have a better opportunity of watching her young ones, she never ceased calling them: and they made towards her, skulking amongst the rushes till they came to the other side of the pond. They had only just left the shell, and had, probably, never heard the cry of their mother before.

Divine magnanimity

When Socrates was sentenced by the Athenian judges, the executioner wept as he handed him the fatal hemlock to drink. Christ knew the judges and rulers of Jerusalem would condemn Him to death, yet tie weeps over them. In the former case, the executioner weeps over the executed, here the case is reversed. Truly, Socrates displayed the character of a philosopher, but Jesus Christ that of a God.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Luke 13:34". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/luke-13.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, that killeth the prophets, and stoneth them that are sent unto her! how often would I have gathered thy children together, even as a hen gathereth her own brood under her wings, and ye would not! Behold, your house is left unto you desolate: and I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.

JESUS' LAMENT OVER JERUSALEM

There is a glimpse in this of the fact that Jesus made a number of trips into Jerusalem during his last circuit. Note the words, "how often would I have gathered thy children." This lament was delivered at least twice, and perhaps as many as three times, as indicated by the placement of it in the Gospels. Luke did not give the date of the lament nor the occasion when it was uttered.

How often ... Regarding these words, Geldenhuys said:

This is a reference to the fact (as expressly stated by John) that Jesus, especially during the last period of his public appearance, visited Jerusalem on more than one occasion. There is a tendency nowadays, even among the more liberal critics, to admit that the fourth Gospel was, after all, correct.[36]

As a hen gathereth her own brood ... The literature of all ages reveals nothing that compares with the tenderness and love of Jesus as manifested toward the Holy City. By so humble a metaphor, the Lord revealed his love and heartbreak over the rejection of his mission by the chosen people, a heartbreak not for himself, but for THEM.

And ye would not ... Deeply as Christ desired the redemption of Jerusalem, the sovereign will of humanity was nevertheless respected; and it was the will of Israel to reject her King.

Your house ... is a reference to the sacred temple, the pride of every Jew; but a change of status in that magnificent building appeared in these words. At first, the temple was God's house; but when it no longer served the ends God intended, it became "theirs." This shows that all religious things are God's only so long as the observance of God's will is connected with them. As Tinsley said, "The temple of the Jews has now become more theirs than God's."[37]

Desolate ... What a dreadful word! Once the holy Shekinah was there within the Holy of Holies; but after Christ was rejected, there was nothing within. Nor would the temple long survive Jesus' pronouncement against it. Within the generation it would fall forever.

Blessed is he that cometh ... etc. Some have seen in this verse, especially with reference to "until that day," a promise referring to "far future, to the day of the penitence of Israel."[38] However, despite the fact that "until" "could have" such meaning, there can be no certainty of it. It was apparently by design that the Holy Spirit uses a word which is, by definition, indefinite and ambiguous. Likewise, Paul in Romans 11:25 spoke of the hardening of Israel "until" the times of the Gentiles be fulfilled. See full discussion of this in my Commentary on Romans, Romans 11:25-26. The meaning is that God has not closed the door upon Israel; they have closed it upon themselves; nor shall God's favor be lavished upon them any more "until" they change, a change that is neither affirmed as certain nor denied as possible.

Christ closed his last public discourse with these same words. His use of them here seems to have been prompted by the lying warning of the Pharisees whose intent on his murder was crystal clear to the Son of God.

[36] Norval Geldenhuys, op. cit., p. 384.

[37] E. J. Tinsley, op. cit., p. 150.

[38] H. D. M. Spence, op. cit., p. 7.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-13.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets,.... These words, with what follow, as they stand in Matthew 23:37 were delivered by Christ, when he was in the temple at Jerusalem; but here they were spoken by him when in Galilee, in Herod's jurisdiction; so that it appears, that the same words were spoken by Christ at different times, in different places, and to different persons: unless it can be thought, that Luke transcribed them from Matthew, and inserts them here, on occasion of Christ's having mentioned the perishing of a prophet in Jerusalem; where many had been killed and put to death, in one way or another, and particularly in the following:

and stonest them that are sent unto thee; as Zechariah, 2 Chronicles 24:20

how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather her brood under her wings, and ye would not? and therefore ought not to have been condemned as a false prophet by their sanhedrim, as he suggests he should be, and as he afterwards was; See Gill on Matthew 23:37.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-13.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen [doth gather] her l brood under [her] wings, and ye would not!

(l) Literally, "the nest": now the brood of chickens is the nest.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-13.html. 1599-1645.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem (Ιερουσαλημ ΙερουσαλημIerousalēm επισυναχαιIerousalēm). In Matthew 23:37. Jesus utters a similar lament over Jerusalem. The connection suits both there and here, but Plummer considers it “rather a violent hypothesis” to suppose that Jesus spoke these words twice. It is possible, of course, though not like Luke‘s usual method, that he put the words here because of the mention of Jerusalem. In itself it is not easy to see why Jesus could not have made the lament both here and in Jerusalem. The language of the apostrophe is almost identical in both places (Luke 13:34.; Matthew 23:37-39). For details see on Matthew. In Luke we have επισυναγαγεινepisunaxai (late first aorist active infinitive) and in Matthew επισυναγωepisunagagein (second aorist active infinitive), both from ποσακις ητελησαepisunagō a double compound of late Greek (Polybius). Both have “How often would I” (ον τροπονposakis ēthelēsa). How often did I wish. Clearly showing that Jesus made repeated visits to Jerusalem as we know otherwise only from John‘s Gospel.

Even as (νοσσιανhon tropon). Accusative of general reference and in Matthew 23:37 also. Incorporation of antecedent into the relative clause.

Brood (νοσσιαnossian) is in Luke while Matthew has chickens (νεοσσιαnossia), both late forms for the older ερημοςneossia The adjective desolate (erēmos) is wanting in Luke 13:35 and is doubtful in Matthew 23:39.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-13.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Would I have gathered ( ἠθέλησα ἐπισυνάξαι )

Lit., “I desired to gather.” See on will kill, Luke 13:31.

Hen

See on Matthew 23:37.

Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-13.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather her brood under her wings, and ye would not!

How often would I have gathered thy children together — Three solemn visits he had made to Jerusalem since his baptism for this very purpose. Matthew 23:37.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-13.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, that killeth the prophets, and stoneth them that are sent unto her1! how often would I have gathered thy children together2, even as a hen [gathereth] her own brood under her wings, and ye would not!

  1. O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, that killeth the prophets, and stoneth them that are sent unto her! etc. Jesus repeated these words again as recorded in Matthew 23:37-39.

  2. How often would I have gathered thy children together. Inhabitants of Jerusalem. See Luke 19:44.

  3. Even as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings, and ye would not! With such beautiful imagery does Jesus set forth his tender love for the people of that city which he knew would soon compass his death.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-13.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

34 O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather her brood under her wings, and ye would not!

Ver. 34. See Matthew 23:37.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-13.html. 1865-1868.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Our Lord concludes this chapter with a compassionate lamentation over Jerusalem, the place where he was to suffer. His ingemination, or doubling of the word, O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, shows the vehemency of his affection towards them, and the sincerity of his desires for their salvation.

Observe, 1. The kindness and compassion of Christ to the Jews in general, and Jerusalem in particular, set forth by a lively metaphor and similitude, namely, that of a hen gathering her chickens under her wings. As the hen does tenderly cherish, and carefully hide and cover her young from the eye of the destroyer; so would Christ have shrouded and sheltered this people from all those birds of prey, and particularly from the Roman eagle, by whose talons they were at last destoyed.

Again, as the hen continues her call to her young ones from morning to night, and holds out her wings for shelter to them all the day long, so did Christ wait for this people's repentance and conversion; for it was more than forty years after they had killed his prophets, and murdered himself, before they met with a final overthrow.

Observe, 2. The amazing obstinacy and willfulness of this people in rejecting the grace and favor, the kindness and condescension, of the Lord Jesus Christ: I would have gathered you, but ye would not.

Observe, 3. The fatal issue of this obstinacy: Behold your house is left unto you desolate; is left, that is, certainly and suddenly will be left desolate (the present tense being put for the paulo post futurum), which denotes the certainty and proximity of this people's ruin.

Learn, 1. That the ruin and destruction of sinners is wholly chargeable upon themselves, that is, on their own willfuness and impenitency, on their own obstinacy and obduracy. I would have gathered you, says Christ, but ye would not.

Learn, 2. How deplorably and inexcusably they will perish, who perish by their own willfulness and obduracy under the gospel.

Learn, 3. That there is no desire like unto God's desire of a people's repentance, no longing like unto God's longing for a people's salvation: O Jerusalem, how oft would I have gathered thee! When shall it once be?

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-13.html. 1700-1703.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 13:34. ἰερουσαλὴμ, Jerusalem) It is not without cause that His discourse is turned to this city; the Pharisees had an intimate tie of connection with it: see Luke 13:31 : and it was in the same city that Herod was about to assail Jesus [ch. Luke 23:11].— πόσακις, how often) Luke 13:7. He had come thither thrice since His baptism: [John 2:23; John 5:1; John 7:10.—Harm., l. c.]— νοσσίαν, her young brood) A collective noun.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-13.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 34-35. See Poole on "Matthew 23:37". See Poole on "Matthew 23:38". See Poole on "Matthew 23:39". These five last verses afford us much for our instruction.

1. We may from them learn the craft of the enemies of the gospel, as well as their malice; they are lions, and will, like lions, tear rand rend when they see an opportunity; but when they see it convenient, then they put on the fox’s skin, doing the same thing by subtlety, which they durst not attempt to effect by cruelty.

2. Their malice is as much perspicuous; who but the children of the devil could have found in their hearts to have desired Christ to go out of their country, who did nothing there but innocently and diligently preach the gospel, deliver people from grievous diseases, and the power of Satan, who miserably possessed and tormented them?

3. When the most malicious enemies of God’s people have done what they can, they shall finish their course, and work the time God hath set them.

4. When they have perfected their work, they shall be perfected. Death is but the perfecting of the saints, as it was the perfecting of Christ.

5. Men shall die, as at the time, so at the place, which God hath set.

6. God sending of his ministers faithfully to reveal his will to people, is a declaration of his willingness to gather them under the wings of his special favour and protection.

7. The perverse wills of men are those things which hinder men and women from being gathered.

8. Temporal judgments, and that of the severest nature, will first or last follow men’s contempt of the offers of grace and salvation.

9. Those that do contemn the means of grace shalt not see them long. —Ye shall not see me.

10. The proudest scorners and contemners of Christ and his grace shall one day wash that one would or might come unto them in the name of the Lord, and do but now contemn what hereafter they would be glad they might enjoy.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 13:34". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-13.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Иерусалим! Иерусалим! В этих словах – огромная нежность, какую можно представить только в образе наседки с цыплятами. Это излияние Божьего сострадания предвещает Его плач о городе, когда Он приблизится к нему в последний раз (19:41). Ясно, что эти чувства – глубокие и искренние (см. пояснение к Мф. 9:36).

хотел Я... и вы не захотели Неоднократные выражения Христом печали о положении Иерусалима не умаляют истинности Его абсолютной верховной власти над всем, что происходит. Не следует использовать истину о Божьем владычестве для уничижения искренности Его сострадания. См. пояснение к Мф. 23:37.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-13.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The persevering wickedness of sinners greatly grieved the Lord Jesus Christ. He would gladly have received them, and given them his salvation; but they refused to accept it, and thus became the guilty authors of their own destruction.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-13.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which kills the prophets, and stones those who are sent to her! How often would I have gathered your children together, even as a hen gathers her own brood under her wings, and you would not!”

He then turns His grieving attention to Jerusalem. He may well have said something like this each time He visited it (compare Matthew 23:37), for Jerusalem, the supposed holy city, represented all that He had come to die for. And it probably almost broke His heart. He saw it as the supreme murderer of prophets. Compare 2 Chronicles 24:20-21; Jeremiah 26:20-23. See also 1 Kings 18:4; 1 Kings 18:13; 1 Kings 19:10; Nehemiah 9:26 for murdered prophets not slain in Jerusalem, for in symbol Jerusalem stands for the whole of Israel.

Jesus then declares that His longing had been to take Jerusalem and its people under His wings, like a mother bird does her chickens, gathering them together to Himself. Compare for the idea Psalms 36:7; Psalms 57:1; Psalms 61:4; Psalms 63:7; Psalms 91:4. Thus He was here taking to Himself the prerogative of God. But He points out that they had rejected Him. They had refused to respond. (The Rabbis would later talk about proselytes coming under the wings of the Shekinah, which confirms that this is a totally Jewish picture, for they would not have copied Jesus).

‘How often.’ This seems to confirm a number of visits to Jerusalem, more even than Luke hints at. It confirms what we find in John.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-13.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

34.O Jerusalem—Jesus reiterated the same apostrophe, in fuller terms, at a later moment, in Jerusalem itself, as his closing sentence before his retirement to the sacrifice of himself for the sins of the world. See notes on Matthew 23:37-39, and cut on opposite page.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-13.html. 1874-1909.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Jerusalem, Jerusalem. Figure of speech Epizeuxis (App-6). See note on Genesis 22:11. Repeated on the second day before the Passover (Matthew 23:37). See App-156.

killest the prophets. See Luke 11:47; Luke 20:14; Luke 23:34. Compare Isaiah 1:21.

would I have gathered = I desired to gather. Compare Luke 13:36

children. App-108.

hen. Specially contrasted with "fox", Luke 13:32. Compare Matthew 23:37.

under. Greek. hupo. App-104.

ye would not = ye did not desire it.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather her brood under her wings, and ye would not!

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather her brood under her wings, and ye would not!

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-13.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather her brood under her wings, and ye would not!
Jerusalem
19:41,42; Matthew 23:37-39
killest
2 Chronicles 24:21,22; 36:15,16; Nehemiah 9:26; Jeremiah 2:30; 26:23; Lamentations 4:13; Matthew 21:35,36; 22:6; Acts 7:52,59; 8:1; Revelation 11:8
how
Deuteronomy 5:29; 32:29; Psalms 81:10,13; Isaiah 48:17-19; 50:2
thy
19:44; 23:28; Psalms 149:2; Lamentations 1:16; Joel 2:23; Galatians 4:25,26
as
Deuteronomy 32:11,12; Ruth 2:12; Psalms 17:8; 36:7; 57:1; 91:4
and ye
15:28; Nehemiah 9:30; Psalms 81:11; Proverbs 1:24-30; Isaiah 30:15; Jeremiah 6:16; 7:23,24; Jeremiah 35:14; 44:4-6; Hosea 11:2,7; Zechariah 1:4; Matthew 22:3; Acts 3:14,15
Reciprocal: Deuteronomy 33:27 - refuge;  2 Kings 21:9 - they hearkened;  2 Kings 21:16 - Manasseh;  Ezra 4:12 - bad city;  Psalm 9:9 - The Lord;  Psalm 46:1 - refuge;  Song of Solomon 1:5 - O ye;  Isaiah 1:21 - become;  Isaiah 27:5 - let him;  Isaiah 44:1 - now;  Isaiah 65:2 - spread;  Jeremiah 11:21 - thou;  Jeremiah 32:31 - this city;  Jeremiah 35:15 - ye have;  Jeremiah 35:17 - because;  Ezekiel 3:7 - Israel will;  Ezekiel 12:3 - it may;  Ezekiel 23:37 - and blood;  Ezekiel 24:9 - Woe;  Hosea 7:1 - I would;  Zechariah 7:13 - as;  Matthew 5:12 - for so;  Mark 12:3 - they;  Luke 7:30 - rejected;  Luke 20:10 - beat;  Luke 24:47 - beginning;  John 5:34 - that;  John 7:34 - GeneralActs 6:14 - that;  Romans 10:1 - my heart's;  1 Thessalonians 2:15 - killed;  Hebrews 11:37 - stoned;  James 5:10 - for

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-13.html.

Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible

Luke 13:34 f. Lament over Jerusalem.—Matthew 23:37-39*. where the setting is more suitable. Lk. omits "desolate." For the saying cf. 2 Esdras 1:30-33, and also the LXX of Isaiah 16:1 f., a passage which was Messianically interpreted, and has the word "desolate" and a reference to scattered birds. It is more likely that Luke 13:35 is a prediction of the Parousia than a mere statement (on one of several visits to Jerusalem) that the citizens will not see Jesus again until He comes as a pilgrim to the Passover and hears the usual greeting accorded to pilgrims.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Peake, Arthur. "Commentary on Luke 13:34". "Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pfc/luke-13.html. 1919.