Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 13:35

Behold, your house is left to you desolate; and I say to you, you will not see Me until the time comes when you say, ‘ Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord !'"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Israel, Prophecies Concerning;   Jerusalem;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Quotations and Allusions;   The Topic Concordance - Blessings;  
Dictionaries:
Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Amen;   Grief, Grieving;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Baptism;   Esau;   Hosanna;   Temple;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Christ, Christology;   Luke, Gospel of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Matthew, Gospel According to;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Benediction;   Blessing (2);   Death of Christ;   Desolation;   Discourse;   Foresight;   Impotence;   Lord's Supper. (I.);   Praise (2);   Quotations (2);   Trinity (2);   Winter ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Christ, Offices of;   Eschatology of the New Testament;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Parousia;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Your house - Ὁ οικος, the temple - called here your house, not my house - I acknowledge it no longer; I have abandoned it, and will dwell in it no more for ever. So he said, 2 Chronicles 36:17, when he delivered the temple into the hands of the Chaldeans - the house of Your sanctuary. A similar form of speech is found, Exodus 32:7, where the Lord said to Moses, Thy people, etc., to intimate that he acknowledged them no longer for his followers. See the notes on Matthew 23:21, Matthew 23:38. But some think that our Lord means, not the temple, but the whole commonwealth of the Jews.

The principal subjects it this chapter may be found considered at large, on the parallel places in Matthew and Mark, to which the reader is referred. As to the account of the woman with the spirit of infirmity, which is not mentioned by any other of the evangelists, see it largely illustrated in the notes on Luke 13:11; (note), etc.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-13.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Behold, your house is left unto you desolate,.... That is, would be in a little time, both city and temple; See Gill on Matthew 23:38.

and verily I say unto you; affirm in the strongest manner:

ye shall not see me; the Arabic version adds, "from henceforth", and so some copies, as in Matthew 23:39 and so the Ethiopic version, "from this time"; that he spoke these words, whether in Galilee, or in the temple:

until the time come; or "until he shall come", meaning himself, and his second coming:

when ye shall say, blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; not they themselves in person, but their posterity, who will be converted in the latter day: and shall acknowledge the Messiah, the blessed of the Lord, who will come in his name, to judge the world in righteousness: or else the meaning is, that when Christ shall come a second time, and every eye shall see him, these Jews, among the rest, shall behold him, whom they have pierced, and mourn; and wish themselves among those, that shall receive him with joyful acclamations; and however, will be obliged to own him as the Messiah, and to confess that he comes in the name, and with the authority of the Lord, and that he is blessed for evermore.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-13.html. 1999.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

35. Behold, your house is left unto you desolate: and verily I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until the time come when ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.

[Ye shall not see me, until the time come when ye shall say, Blessed is he, &c.] There was a time (I confess) when I apprehended no difficulty at all in these words; but now (which may seem a paradox) my old eyes see better than my younger ones did; and by how much the more I look into this passage, by so much the more obscure it appears to me.

I. What sense must that be taken in, Ye shall not see me? when as after he had said this, (at least as the words are placed in our evangelist), they saw him conversant amongst them for the space of three months and more: particularly and in a singular manner, in that august triumph, when riding upon an ass he had the acclamations of the people in these very words, "Blessed is he that cometh," &c. One might therefore think, that the words have some respect to this very time and action; but that in St. Matthew these words are repeated by our Saviour after this triumph was over.

Christ is now at Jerusalem, at the feast of Dedication; at least that feast was not far off; for we find him going to it, verse 22: so that this exposition of the words looks fair enough; "Ye see me now, but henceforward ye shall see me no more, until ye shall say, 'Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord'"; which very thing was said in that triumph of his. But what shall we say then to that of St. Matthew, that these very words are recited sometime after he had received these acclamations from the people? I would hardly believe with the learned Heinsius, that the words in St. Matthew are not set in their proper place, but the series of the history is transposed: I would rather think our Saviour meant not an ocular seeing him, but spoke it in a spiritual and borrowed sense; viz. in the sense wherein the Jews were wont to use the word seeing, when they spake of "seeing the Messiah, the days of the Messiah, and the consolation of Israel"; that is, of partaking and enjoying the comforts and advantages of the Messiah, and of those days of his. So that our Saviour's meaning may seem to be this; "Ye shall, from henceforward, enjoy no benefit from me the Messiah, till ye shall say, 'Blessed is he that cometh,'" &c.: for it is worthy our inquiry, whether Christ ever after these words of his, did endeavour so to gather the children of Jerusalem together, that the city might not be destroyed, and the whole nation cast off. He did indeed endeavour to gather the remnant according to the election of grace, but did he ever after this labour that the place and nation might be preserved? As to these, it is argument enough that he had given them wholly over in his own mind, in that here, and in St. Matthew, he did in such precise terms denounce the ruin of Jerusalem, immediately before he uttered these words. I had rather, therefore, than admit any immethodicalness in St. Matthew, expound the passage to this sense; "From henceforward, ye shall never see the consolations of Messiah, nor have me any ways propitious amongst you, endeavouring at all the preservation of your city or nation from ruin, till ye shall say, 'Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.'"

II. But then here ariseth as great a difficulty about the word till; that is, whether it concludes that in time they will say and acknowledge it; or whether it excludes and denies that they ever shall. For who knows not how different and even contrary a force there is in this word until? "Occupy till I come": here it concludes that he will come again. "This iniquity shall not be forgiven you till you die": there their forgiveness is excluded for ever. And indeed the expression in this place looks so perfectly two ways, that he that believes the conversion of the Jewish nation as a thing must come to pass, may turn it to his side; he that believes the contrary, to his.

[Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.] Although a more intimate weighing of these words will not very much help in determining the force of this word until in this place, yet will it probably afford us some light into the whole clause.

The words are taken out of Psalm 118:26, and were sung in the Great Hallel. So that I will beg the reader's leave to digress a little in search of this usage, especially as to those words that are now in hand.

I. The Great Hallel was the recitation of Psalms 113-118 upon every feast, in every family or brotherhood. The hymn that our Saviour with his apostles sung at the close of the Passover was the latter part of this Hallel.

II. Every one, indeed, was of right bound to repeat it entirely in his own person. But seeing it was not every one's lot to be so learned or expedite as that came to, there was one to recite it in the stead of all the rest, and they after him made some responsals. This went for a maxim amongst them, if he hear, it is as if he responded. If he hear, though he do not answer, he performs his duty: the meaning is, if any be so unskillful that he can neither recite himself, nor answer after another that doth recite, let him but hear attentively, and he doth as much as is required from him.

III. There was a twofold way of responding according to the difference of persons reciting. If an elder, or master of a family, or one that could fitly represent the whole congregation, should recite or lead in singing; then the rest repeat no other words after him except the first clause of every Psalm; and as to all the remainder, they answered verse by verse Hallelujah. For the action of him that represented them, and led up in singing, availed for those that were represented, especially they having testified their consent by answering Hallelujah. He was a dunce, indeed, that could not answer so far amongst the rest.

IV. But if there wanted such an elder so well skilled in reading or reciting, that it became necessary for a servant or woman, or some more skilful boy, to lead, then let us hear what they did in that case: "If a servant, or woman, or boy should lead in singing, every one in the congregation recites those very words which he had said: if a more ancient person or one of greater note, do sing or read, they answer after him 'Hallelujah.' Now the reason why the words recited by a servant, woman, or boy should be repeated after him verbatim, was this, because such a one was unfit to represent a congregation, and his action could not avail for the rest: so that it behoved every person to recite singly for himself, that he might perform his duty."

V. When they came to the words now in hand, blessed be he that cometh in the name of the Lord, if it be a boy or a servant that is the praecentor, he saith, Blessed be he that cometh; and the rest answer, In the name of the Lord. And this is that for which I have so long ventured upon the reader's patience, that he may observe what is done differently from the rest when this clause is recited. It is cut in two, which is not done in others. And the first words are not repeated after the praecentor, as they are in other clauses. And whether this custom obtained only in families where servants or boys led in singing, we may judge from this following passage:

"They asked R. Chaijam Bar Ba, 'How doth it appear, that he who heareth and doth not answer performs his duty?' 'From this, saith he, That we see the greatest Rabbins standing in the synagogue, and they say, Blessed be he that cometh, and they answer, In the name of the Lord: and they both perform their duty.'" Midras Tillin leaves these last words wholly out. For so that hath it: "The men of Jerusalem say from within, Save us now, O Lord, we beseech thee. The men of Judea say from without, Prosper us now, Lord, we beseech thee. The men of Jerusalem say from within, Blessed be he that cometh: and the men of Judea say from without, We have blessed you out of the house of the Lord."

I will not confidently assert that these men had any ill design when they thus mangled this famous clause; but surely there is at least some ground of suspicion that they hardly refer the words to the right object. R. Solomon assuredly doth not. For, "So it ought to be said (saith he) to those that bring their firstfruits, and go up to the feasts."

1. To come is oftentimes the same with them as to teach; "If any one shall come in his own name, him ye will receive": i.e. If any one shall teach. And so it is frequently in the Jerusalem Talmud, concerning this or the other Rabbins, he came, and when he cometh. Which if it be not to be understood of such a one teaching, I confess I am at a loss what it should mean else.

2. Those doctors did not come and teach in the name of the Lord, but either in their own name, or in the name of some father of the traditions. Hence nothing more familiar with them, than "R. N. in the name of R. N. saith": as every leaf, I may say almost every line of their writings witnesses. If, therefore, by cutting short this clause, they would be appropriating to themselves the blessing of the people, whom they had taught to say, Blessed be he that cometh, letting that slip, or omitting what follows, In the name of the Lord; they do indeed like themselves, cunningly lying at catch, and hunting after fame and vainglory.

Let the reader judge, whether Christ might not look this way in these words. However, I shall not scruple to determine, that they shall never see the Messiah, as to any advantage to themselves, till they have renounced the doctrines of coming in their own name, or in the name of the Fathers of the Traditions, embracing his doctrine, who is come in the name of the Lord.

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-13.html. 1675.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Behold, your house is left unto you desolate: and verily I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until the time come when ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.

Your house is left to you desolate — Is now irrecoverably consigned to desolation and destruction: And verily I say to you, after a very short space, ye shall not see me till the time come, when taught by your calamities, ye shall be ready and disposed to say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord. It does not imply, that they should then see Jesus at all; but only that they would earnestly wish for the Messiah, and in their extremity be ready to entertain any who should assume that character.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-13.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

Behold, your house1 is left unto you [desolate]2: and I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord3.

  1. Behold, your house. The temple.

  2. Is left unto you [desolate]. He was about to withdraw from the temple, which for centuries to come was to be visited by no heavenly messenger whatever.

  3. And I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord. It is hardly possible that these words can refer to the triumphal entry for their fulfillment (Matthew 21:9). The use of them on that occasion may have had no reference to his prediction. They undoubtedly refer to the Parousia, or second coming of the Lord in his glory, before which time the Jews must turn and believe (Romans 11:25-27). Not until they were thus prepared would they again see him without whom they were now rejecting.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.
Bibliographical Information
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "The Fourfold Gospel". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-13.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

These words might have been considered as a prediction of the events related in Matthew 21:7-9, were it not that Matthew records the words as spoken after that time. (Matthew 23:37,39.) As it is, there is a difficulty in regard to their interpretation.

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Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/luke-13.html. 1878.

Scofield's Reference Notes

until (See Scofield "Matthew 23:39").

Lord Jehovah. Psalms 118:26.

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Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Luke 13:35". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/luke-13.html. 1917.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE DESOLATE HOUSE

‘Behold, your house is left unto you desolate.’

Luke 13:35

There is no such mournful passage in all history as this. The danger is that we think of old Jerusalem, a city now practically extinct, a city that flourished nineteen hundred years ago. This is Jerusalem, and me are the rejecting inhabitants.

I. Christ rejected.—We every day reject overtures of love, and turn our backs on doors that open to give us hospitality and rest. Every day we insult Deity; every day we put our fingers in our ears and shut out the most charming music; every day we desire the night to come in order that we may do the deed of darkness. That is the mystery of experience that makes all the realities of revelation possible to our faith.

II. Christ’s tenderness. ‘Behold, your house is left unto you desolate.’ Your house is ‘desolate.’ It was not shouted, it was not uttered in denunciation; there was no accent of threatening in the tone. The pathos of the word is its power. We do amiss to think that Jesus Christ pronounced His woes as if they were resentments or angry threatenings. They were full of tears; they would have been nothing but for their pathos.

III. Choose ye!—Still is the cry, ‘Choose ye this day whom ye will serve.’ But if we reject Christ once and again, and three times and seven times; if we keep Him standing knocking at the door and never reply, we must not wonder if, when after a long time we open the door to see if He is still there, we find He is gone. ‘Your house is left unto you desolate.’ You do not know how much your house owes now to the very knock you never answer. Christ cannot even be outside the door without a blessing being about the house. His very presence is a benediction; His very touch is a security. So long as He is found there outside, wet with dew, all night choking His voice into a moan, your house is not without a comfort. The accidental blessings, the blessings which come through Christ’s presence and ministry, you can never calculate. But when He is gone, when He no longer knocks at your door, then ‘your house is left unto you desolate.’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-13.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

35 Behold, your house is left unto you desolate: and verily I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until the time come when ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.

Ver. 35. See Matthew 23:38-39.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-13.html. 1865-1868.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

Reader! let us both, as we contemplate the Lord's visitations on those Galileans and men of Siloam, gather improvement from what Jesus hath said, and solemnly remember, that without faith and repentance, which are both the gifts of God, and arising from the Lord's regenerating the heart, we shall all likewise perish. And, Reader! in the barren fig-tree, growing without fruit within the pale of God's vineyard, the Church, let us behold the awful state of all those who have a name to live, but yet are virtually dead before God. Oh! the blessedness of being found trees of the Lord's planting, made fat and fruitful by his blessing!

Precious Lord Jesus! do thou graciously come into our synagogues, thy Churches, on thine own day, and every day in thine ordinances! Oh! how many of thine, like this daughter of Abraham, are bound in the Adam-nature of sin by Satan! And wilt thou not, dear Lord! call them all to thee? lay thine Almighty hand upon them, and make them whole? All thy redeemed will glorify thee for all the gracious manifestations of thy love. And do thou, dearest Lord! give thy people to see thy unremitting watchfulness and care over them. All the tenderness and solicitude of the hen cannot describe the boundless love of Jesus, in gathering his little ones to him, and covering them with his wings, while thy faithfulness and truth become their shield and buckler. And oh! thou gracious, God of our salvation, cause us to note down, in the strongest characters, thy distinguishing grace! While nations and individuals, like Jerusalem of old, became Gospel despisers, and perish, and refuse to have thee to reign over them, do thou, Lord! strongly impress the wonderous truth upon the hearts of all thy redeemed, that it is all of grace wherein they differ, and that to thy grace they may cheerfully ascribe all the glory.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/luke-13.html. 1828.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 13:35. ἰδοὺ ἀφίεται ὑμῖν οἶκος ὑμῶν) Many have added ἔρημος from Matthew.(137) In Luke the Saviour is represented as having said these words in Galilee: nor did He subsequently afford the people of Jerusalem the opportunity of seeing Him, until, after the resurrection of Lazarus, at His own royal entry, they said, Blessed is He who cometh in the name of the Lord.(138) Therefore, from the time of this declaration and prelude up to the time of that entry of His, He left their house to them,(139) though not yet however ‘desolate’ [therefore the ἔρη΄ον here is spurious]. But in Matthew, after His royal entry, going out from the temple for the last time, He solemnly declared their house to be left desolate.(140) [We have been permitted to observe the same nice distinction in the words respectively used, between Luke 11:49, and Matthew 23:34 : see the notes on both passages.—Harm., p. 407.]— λέγω δὲ ὑμῖν, but I say unto you) He speaks sternly, and yet mercifully, as we have just now remarked. Nay, even in Matthew 23:39, the ἀμὴν, verily, is wanting, by the insertion of which in Luke some have intensified the sternness of His denunciation.(141) The particle, δὲ, but, opposes to one another the present desolation of their abandoned house, and their acclamations so soon about to follow.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-13.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 13:34"

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 13:35". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-13.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

Это повествование Луки определенно приходится на более ранний момент в служении Христа, чем аналогичное описание в Мф. 23:37-39 события, происшедшего в храме в последние дни Христа в Иерусалиме. Тем не менее форма выражения двух плачей фактически идентична. Здесь Христос пророчески произносит такое же самое откровение, которое позже Он объявит как окончательный приговор.

благословен Цитата из Пс. 117:26.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-13.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“Behold, your house is left to you desolate, and I say to you, ‘You shall not see me, until you shall say, Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.’ ”

And the result of her rejection of Him could only result in the desolation of her house, either of the Temple or of the city (linguistic considerations might suggest ‘the city’, that is, the people of the city, for it bears a pronominal suffix making it personal to the people). A desolated and forsaken people of Jerusalem would one day bear witness to their failure to receive Him (compare chapter Luke 21:20-24).

And now He was leaving them and they would not see Him again until they greeted Him with the words from Psalms 118:26, “Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord.” This may be referring to:

1). To the future visit on which they welcomed Him on His entry into Jerusalem with similar words to these (Luke 19:38). Although if so it would be sarcastic and cynical. But that is unlikely. Pilgrims were welcomed at every Passover with the same words. None would see that as momentous. Yet the momentous first half of the sentence requires an equally momentous second half.

2). It may be suggesting that the total desolation of every Jew as a result of what would happen to Jerusalem would only be remedied for those who turned from it to recognise their true Messiah, to ‘see Him’ and to acknowledge Him. Then their house would no longer be desolate for they would see that in His rising again they had a new Temple (John 2:19-21) of which they could become a part (Ephesians 2:11-22).

3). Or it may be His way of pointing out that although Jerusalem may be desolated, it will yet be renewed, so that some of its inhabitants (Jewish, Arab and other Christians who live in Jerusalem) will welcome Him when He comes in His Messianic glory, as He has promised.

4). Most likely it may be declaring prophetically that one day Jerusalem would reluctantly have to admit what He is, in spite of their unbelief. Jerusalem might fail, but it would have to finally admit that the Messiah that it had rejected had not failed, because they would see Him coming in judgment and in glory (Revelation 1:7).

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-13.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

35.Your house is left—Our Lord speaks as from a future standpoint; namely, his departure by death at the crucifixion. The word desolate is here spurious; but is used in the later utterance of the apostrophe as the sign of utter giving over of the city to its fate.

Not see me—In the later utterance Jesus adds ye shall not see me henceforth; as the standpoint of his abandonment, was then already assumed. That sad abandonment still continues, for the vail is still on Israel’s heart. But though Jerusalem be desolate and Israel scattered, His unseen person is still on Zion, and His unseen feet still stand on Olivet. His ever preserving care perpetuates the race in its vicissitudes, waiting for the day when devoted Israel shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of Jesus the Lord. Through what ages his spirit shall thereafter watch over restored and millennial Israel until He shall appear to gather his elect into his kingdom, we cannot say. For in the dim perspective of prophecy distant events and ages are reduced in size; time is almost dropped from the account, and events far asunder are visually made to touch. See notes on Matthew 24:14-29. See, also, Supplementary Note on Matthew 25. But when at the consummation of the time he shall appear, every eye shall see him; the guilty shall look upon him whom they have pierced, and mourn; and the true Jerusalem shall say, Blessed is he that COMETH.

 

 

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-13.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 13:35. The word translated ‘desolate’ is omitted by the best authorities, but ‘forsaken’ may be supplied to bring out the entire sense of the rest of the clause.

And I say, etc. Matthew: ‘for.’ There the reason is given, since the Lord was then finally leaving the temple; here the reference is more prophetic. ‘Henceforth,’ which in Matthew marks the beginning of the desolation at that moment, is not found here. These little things show that this was spoken at an earlier time. Some belittle the prediction by referring it to our Lord’s triumphal entry just before the Passover, when the people cried, Blessed, etc. The disciples may have misunderstood this prediction, and thought it fulfilled on that occasion, but in fact Jerusalem did not say this, but said ‘Who is this?’ (Matthew 21:10), and objected (chap. Luke 19:34). It is far more natural to suppose that already our Lord mourned over the impending fate of the holy city.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-13.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

your house = the Temple. It had been Jehovah"s house. Compare John 2:16. Now it was no longer owned as His. Compare Luke 19:46.

desolate. Every place is "desolate" where Christ is not.

verily. See note on Matthew 5:18.

not = by no means. Greek. ou me. App-105. until. Greek. heos an all the texts omit "an", but it does not alter the conditional sense, which is in the verb).

Blessed. Figure of speech Benedictio, as in Luke 1:42; Luke 19:38; not Beatitude, as in Luke 12:37, Luke 12:38, Luke 12:43, or Luke 14:14, Luke 14:15. Quoted from Psalms 118:26. Referring to the final and national repentance of Israel, which might have been then (Acts 3:18-20)near, but Acts 28:25-28 is yet future, while all blessedness has been postponed.

He That cometh = the coming One.

LORD = Jehovah. App-4and App-98.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-13.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Behold, your house is left unto you desolate: and verily I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until the time come when ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.

Behold, your house is left unto you desolate: and verily I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until the time come when ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord. How naturally this melting Lamentation would be wrung from Christ's heart after the words just uttered, let the devout and intelligent reader judge. And yet there are critics of some weight who regard it as but a repetition by the Third Evangelist of the Lamentation uttered considerably later, on His final departure from the Temple, and recorded in its proper place by Matthew (Matthew 23:37-39). For the exposition, see the notes at Matthew 23:37-39, with Remarks at the close of that section.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-13.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Behold, your house is left unto you desolate: and verily I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until the time come when ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.
your
21:5,6,24; Leviticus 26:31,32; Psalms 69:25; Isaiah 1:7,8; 5:5,6; 64:10,11; Daniel 9:26,27; Micah 3:12; Zechariah 11:1,2; 14:2; Acts 6:13,14
Ye shall not
Hosea 3:4,5; John 7:34-36; 8:22-24; 12:35,36; 14:19-23
Blessed
19:38-40; Psalms 118:26; Isaiah 40:9-11; 52:7; Zechariah 12:10; Matthew 21:9; Mark 11:9; Mark 11:10; John 12:13; Romans 10:9-15; 2 Corinthians 3:15-18 Reciprocal: Jeremiah 35:15 - ye have;  Jeremiah 35:17 - because;  Ezekiel 24:9 - Woe;  Zechariah 7:13 - as;  Matthew 5:18 - verily;  Matthew 23:38 - GeneralLuke 17:22 - when;  Luke 19:44 - thy children

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 13:35". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-13.html.