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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:12

And He also went on to say to the one who had invited Him, "When you give a luncheon or a dinner, do not invite your friends or your brothers or your relatives or rich neighbors, otherwise they may also invite you in return and that will be your repayment.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Call not thy friends, etc. - Our Lord certainly does not mean that a man should not entertain at particular times, his friends, etc.; but what he inculcates here is charity to the poor; and what he condemns is those entertainments which are given to the rich, either to flatter them, or to procure a similar return; because the money that is thus criminally laid out properly belongs to the poor.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/luke-14.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Call not thy friends … - This is not to be understood as commanding us not to entertain “at all” our relatives and friends; but we are to remember the “design” with which our Lord spoke. He intended, doubtless, to reprove those who sought the society of the wealthy, and particularly rich relatives, and those who claimed to be intimate with the great and honorable, and who, to show their intimacy, were in the habit of “seeking” their society, and making for them expensive entertainments. He meant, also, to commend charity shown to the poor. The passage means, therefore, call “not only” your friends, but call also the poor, etc. Compare Exodus 16:8; 1 Samuel 15:22; Jeremiah 7:22-23; Matthew 9:13.

Thy kinsmen - Thy relations.

A recompense - Lest they feel themselves bound to treat you with the same kindness, and, in so doing, neither you nor they will show any kind spirit, or any disposition to do good beyond what is repaid.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-14.html. 1870.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

And he said to him also that had bidden him, When thou makest dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, nor thy kinsmen, nor rich neighbors; lest haply they also bid thee again and a recompense be made thee.

Geldenhuys said this means "One should not invite such persons EXCLUSIVELY."[16] Adam Clark wrote:

Our Lord certainly does not mean that a man should not entertain at particular times his friends, etc.; but what he indicates here is charity to the poor.[17]

Spence thought that "Jesus did not mean to forbid our entertaining those whom we love. He means, simply, `In view of the life to come, thou canst do better still'."[18] Lamar believed that:

Jesus does not mean here to prohibit the invitation and entertainment of those who might be able to reciprocate the courtesy; but to condemn (1) the motive with which it is some times done, and (2) the exclusiveness growing out of such motive, which limits the invitation of this class.[19]

All of the above softening of the impact of this passage would appear to be valid! However, there is far too much of the same thing that Jesus condemned in the hospitality one sees today; and, in not a few churches, there are little cliques engaged almost exclusively in entertaining themselves; and that, we are certain, is wrong.

John Wesley, also, like practically all commentators on this passage, diminished the impact of it in this manner: "That is, I do not bid thee call thy friends or thy neighbors. Our Lord leaves those offices of humanity and courtesy as they were, and teaches a higher duty."[20]

We may not be too certain, however, that the commentators have fully understood what Jesus meant here. Perhaps Jesus was outlining here just what true righteousness and genuine hospitality actually are; and if that is the case, one confronts here a righteousness that is above all human achievement of it. This is what man SHOULD do, regardless of the fact that all men find themselves unable, absolutely, to live up to this ethic, thus making the passage similar to the command, "Be ye therefore perfect, even as your heavenly Father is perfect" (Matthew 5:48).

[16] Norval Geldenhuys, op. cit., p. 391.

[17] Adam Clarke, op. cit., p. 452.

[18] H. D. M. Spence, Pulpit Commentary (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1962), Vol. 16, Luke II, p. 24.

[19] J. S. Lamar, op. cit., p. 193.

[20] John Wesley, Notes on the New Testament (Naperville, Illinois: Alec. R. Allenson, Inc., 1950), p. 257.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then said he also to him that bad him,.... As he had given advice and instructions to the guests, so he likewise thought fit to give some to the master of the house, that had given both him and them an invitation to the present meal; observing, very likely, that his guests consisted of such persons as are hereafter described.

When thou makest a dinner, or a supper; any entertainment for other persons, at what time of the day soever, whether sooner or later, at noon, or at night, on sabbath days, or others:

call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, neither thy kinsmen, nor thy rich neighbours: that is, do not invite thy rich friends, rich brethren, and rich kinsmen, as well as not rich neighbours: not that our Lord's meaning is, that such should not be invited at all; which would be to destroy friendship and sociable conversation among persons in such a relation, and of such rank and fortune: but his sense is, that not these only should be invited, to the neglect of poor friends, poor brethren, poor kinsmen, and poor neighbours; and who, comparatively speaking, should rather be invited than the former, as being what would be more serviceable to them, and of a greater advantage in the issue to the master of the feast himself.

Lest they also bid thee again; and thee only, and not the poor, to as grand an entertainment, which is commonly done:

and a recompense be made thee: one feasting bout for another, so that there will be no obligation on either side; and this will be all the advantage that will be gained; the return is made here, and there will be no reward hereafter.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

3 Then said he also to him that bade him, When thou makest a dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, neither thy kinsmen, nor [thy] rich neighbours; lest they also bid thee again, and a recompence be made thee.

(3) Against those who spend their goods either for the glory of man or for hope of recompence, whereas Christian charity considers only the glory of God, and the profit of our neighbour.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-14.html. 1599-1645.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

A dinner or a supper (αριστον η δειπνονariston ē deipnon). More exactly, a breakfast or a dinner with distinction between them as already shown. This is a parable for the host as one had just been given for the guests, though Luke does not term this a parable.

Call not (μη πωνειmē phōnei). ΜηMē and the present imperative active, prohibiting the habit of inviting only friends. It is the exclusive invitation of such guests that Jesus condemns. There is a striking parallel to this in Plato‘s Phaedrus 233.

Recompense (ανταποδομαantapodoma). In the form of a return invitation. Like αντιanti in “bid thee again” (αντικαλεσωσινantikalesōsin).


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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright © Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Dinner - supper

See on Matthew 22:4. Supper ( δειπνον ) is the principal meal at evening, and corresponding to the modern late dinner.

Call not thy friends, etc

A striking parallel occurs in Plato's “Phaedrus233. “And, in general, when you make a feast, invite not your friend, but the beggar and the empty soul, for they will love you, and attend you, and come about your doors, and will be the best pleased, and the most grateful, and will invoke blessings on your head.”


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Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then said he also to him that bade him, When thou makest a dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, neither thy kinsmen, nor thy rich neighbours; lest they also bid thee again, and a recompence be made thee.

Call not thy friends — That is, I do not bid thee call thy friends or thy neighbours. Our Lord leaves these offices of humanity and courtesy as they were, and teaches a higher duty. But is it not implied herein, that we should be sparing in entertaining those that need it not, in order to assist those that do need, with all that is saved from those needless entertainments? Lest a recompense be made - This fear is as much unknown to the world, as even the fear of riches.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-14.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

And he said to him also that had bidden him, When thou makest a dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, nor thy kinsmen, nor rich neighbors1; lest haply they also bid thee again, and a recompense be made thee2.
    Luke 14:12,13

  1. When thou makest a dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, nor thy kinsmen, nor rich neighbors. According to the Oriental mode of speech Jesus here emphatically commands one course of action by prohibiting a contrary course.

  2. Lest haply they also bid thee again, and a recompense be made thee. But his prohibition is not to be construed strictly. He does not forbid the exercise of social hospitality, but discountenances that interested form of it which seeks a return.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/luke-14.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

12.When thou makest a dinner. Those who think that this is an absolute condemnation of entertainments given by relatives and friends to each other, take away a part of civility from among men. It were not only unfeeling, but barbarous, to exclude relatives from the hospitable table, and to class them only with strangers. Christ did not intend to dissuade us from every thing courteous, but merely to show, that acts of civility, which are customary among men, are no proof whatever of charity. To perform any act, in the hope of a reward, to rich men, from whom we expect a similar return, is not generosity, but a system of commercial exchange; and, in like manner, kind offices, rendered from mercenary views, are of no account in the sight of God, and do not deserve to be ascribed to charity. If I entertain at supper my relatives or rich friends, the act of civility ought not in itself to be condemned, but, as a proof of charity, it will have no value whatever; for we frequently see that persons who are extremely selfish grudge no expense or luxury in treating their friends. What then? You may spread a table for the rich, but, at the same time, you must not neglect the poor; you may feast with your friends and relatives, but you must not shut out strangers, if they shall happen to be poor, and if you shall have the means of relieving their wants. In a word, the meaning of the passage is, that those who are kind to relatives and friends, but are niggardly towards the poor, are entitled to no commend-ation; because they do not exercise charity, but consult only their own gain or ambition.

Christ addresses, in a particular manner, the person who had invited him; because he perceived that he was too much addicted to pomp and luxury, and was so desirous to obtain the applause and favor of the rich, that he cared very little about the poor. Accordingly, in the person of one man, this reproof is directed against all those who spend their wealth in ambitious display, or who bargain for mutual compensation, but leave nothing over for the poor, as if they were afraid that whatever is gratuitously bestowed would be lost.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/luke-14.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

12 Then said he also to him that bade him, When thou makest a dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, neither thy kinsmen, nor thy rich neighbours; lest they also bid thee again, and a recompence be made thee.

Ver. 12. Nor thy rich neighbour] Laudent te esurientium viscera, non ructantium opulenta convivia, saith Jerome. Bishop Hooper had his board of beggars, who were daily served by four at a mess, with wholesome meats, before himself sat down to dinner. (Acts and Mon.)


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 14:12. When thou makest a dinner, &c.— "By no means confine thy hospitality to thy rich relations, acquaintance and neighbours, or to them chiefly, lest the whole of thy reward be an invitation from them to a like entertainment;" for that the text here, as in some other instances, impliesthe addition of the particle only, appears from this, that our Lord cannot be supposed to exclude entirely from the entertainments of the rich, all those who are not objects of charity; or to forbid every sort of expence, which has not the poor for its immediate object. His going to entertainments frequently, as well as his suffering himself to be anointed with precious ointments, shews plainly that the obligations we are under of being charitable to the poor, does not hinder us from doing honour to those whom we esteem, though it should be attended with some expence. It is very apparent that the word rich refers not merely to neighbours, but also to the kindred, and other persons who are mentioned with them. For if these were in low circumstances, their being related to them was an argument why they should be regarded, rather than neglected. It is probable, that our Lord observed in the Pharisees a habit of making magnificent feasts, and of treating the great as well as their equals out of pride, ambition, and ostentation; which might render this advice peculiarly proper, especially if he who now gave the entertainment was, as many of his brethren certainly were, very deficient in works of charity.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-14.html. 1801-1803.

Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

Observe here, that it is not an absolute denial of calling brethren and kinsfolk, and rich neighbors: but Christ forbids the bidding of them alone, and requires that the poor be refreshed at or from our table: for when the rich feast one another, and let the poor fast and pine; this is very sinful.

Accordingly our Saviour, observing how the Pharisee that bade him to dinner, invited only the rich, overlooking and neglecting the poor, he exhorts him and the company, that whenever they make entertainments for the time to come, they should not only invite their rich neighbors, and friends. Who can and will invite them again; but remember the poor.

Here note,

1. That civil courtesies, and hospitable entertainments of kindred and friends, for maintaining and preserving love and concord, is not only lawful, but an expedient and necessary duty; Use hospitality one to another (says St. Peter) without grudging.

2. That though it be not unlawful to invite and feast the rich, yet it is most acceptable to God when we feed and refresh the poor: When thou makest a feast call rather the poor, and thou shalt be blessed. We must prefer the duties of Christian charity before the acts of common civility: blessed are those feast makers, who make the bowels of the hungry to bless them.

3. That God often times rewards our liberality to the poor very signally in this life; but if it be deferred, we shall not fail to receive it at the resurrection of the just: The poor cannot recompense thee, but thou shalt be recompensed at the resurrection of the just.


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Bibliography
Burkitt, William. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/luke-14.html. 1700-1703.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:12. [ τῷ κεκληκότι, to him that had bidden Him) This Pharisee was not one of the worst stamp; see Luke 14:14.—V. g.]— ἄριστον δεῖπνον, a dinner [rather the morning meal, or breakfast], or a supper [rather a dinner]) More usually there is made the simple mention of supper: therefore the meal at this time may have been the early meal [ ἄριστον, prandium, breakfast or luncheon]. See Luke 5:1; Luke 5:25.— μὴ φώνει τοὺς φίλους, do not give an invitation to thy friends) that is to say, I do not tell thee to invite thy friends, etc. Jesus leaves as it were in their own place [as generally recognised] invitations which arise out of a natural or social tie of connection. He Himself enjoins [besides] a better class of invitations. He does not altogether abolish the offices of friendly courtesy.— πλουσίους, [when they happen to be] rich) This epithet is to be joined to τοὺς φίλουςἀδελφοὺςσυγγενεῖςγείτονας, those of thy friends, brethren, relatives, neighbours who may be rich, but who are often neglected when they are poor: But the epithet chiefly belongs to γείτονας, neighbours; to which four classes of those well-off in the world, there are opposed as many classes of those who are not so in Luke 14:13,— μήποτεἀνταπόδομα, lest—a recompense) This kind of fear is unknown to the world, as is also fear of riches [Give me neither poverty nor riches], Proverbs 30:8. This is the foundation of true liberality, and αὐταρκεία, independent contentedness. Who is there that would wish that all his acts in this life should be recompensed according to their desert? [And yet there are not wanting persons, who wish that everything whatever, which they give or lend, should be most quickly, abundantly, and with accumulated interest, repaid to them: nay they even hunt after both peculiar privileges and undeserved opportunities which for crushing many others, with such great eagerness, that one might suppose that there was no resurrection at hand or recompense of men’s deed, nay, indeed, as if nothing is to be taken away (wrested) from those, who practically deny their faith in things future by their unbridled panting after things present. At what a fearful cost do these things present stand to not a few persons, with whom they are turned into a matter of plunder and rapacity! Happy is he, who is not loath to wait (for his good things). Do not be unduly chagrined, if at any time it will happen that in some case you fail (are disappointed) in the world. But beware of judging rather harshly of others, whom, whether you will or not, you cannot but perceive to have precedency given to them above yourself.—V. g.]— καὶ γενήσεται) Concerning this construction, μήποτε καὶ αὐτοί σε ἀντικαλέσωσι [Subj.], καὶ γενήσεταί [Indic.], σοι ἀνταπόδομα, the exact counterpart to which occurs in Luke 14:9 [where see note], a judgment may be formed from the note on Mark 3:27, which see. From not observing this, many have altered γενήσεται to γένηται.(144)


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Bibliography
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Ver. 12-14. Many things are delivered in Scripture in the form of an absolute and universal prohibition, which must not be so understood, amongst which this is one instance. None must think that our Saviour doth here absolutely or universally forbid our invitations of our brethren, or kinsmen, or rich neighbours, or friends, to dinners or suppers with us; there was nothing more ordinarily practised amongst the Jews; Christ himself was at divers meals: but Christ by this teacheth us,

1. That this is no act of charity; it is indeed a lawful act of humanity and civility, and of a good tendency sometimes to procure amity and friendship amongst neighbours and friends, but no such act of charity as they could expect a heavenly reward for.

2. That such feastings ought not to be upheld in prejudice to our duty in relieving the poor, that is, they ought not to be maintained in such excesses and immoderate degrees, as by them we shall disable ourselves from that relief of the poor, which God requireth of us, as our duty, with respect to the estate with which he hath blessed us.

3. That we may most reasonably expect a recompence from heaven for such good works as we do, for which we are not recompensed on earth.

4. That God’s recompences of us, for doing our duty in obedience to his commands, are often deferred until the resurrection of the just, but then they will not fail obedient souls.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:12". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

12. μὴ φώνει τοὺς φίλους σου. In this, as many of our Lord’s utterances, we must take into account [1] the idioms of Oriental speech; [2] the rules of common sense, which teach us to distinguish between the letter and the spirit. It is obvious that our Lord did not mean to forbid the common hospitalities between kinsmen and equals, but only, as the context shews, [1] to discourage a mere interested hospitality intended to secure a return; and [2] to assert that unselfish generosity is superior to the common civilities of friendliness. The “not” therefore means, as often elsewhere in Scripture, “not only, but also,” or “not so much … as,” as in Proverbs 8:10; John 6:27; 1 Corinthians 1:17; 1 Corinthians 15:10; 1 Timothy 2:9, &c. In other words, “not” sometimes denies “not absolutely but conditionally (Galatians 5:21) and comparatively (1 Corinthians 1:17).” See Matthew 9:13; Jeremiah 7:22; Joel 2:13; Hebrews 8:11. In Hellenistic Greek φωνεῖν is used for καλεῖν.

μήποτε καὶ αὐτοὶ κ.τ.λ. Lest perchance they too. “This,” says Bengel, “is a fear not known to the world.” The turn of the sentence is, in fact, what a Greek would have described as a happy παρὰ προσδοκίαν. It teaches by surprise.

καὶ γένηται ἀνταπόδομά σοι. In a similar case Martial says, “You are asking for gifts, Sextus, not for friends.”


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Bibliography
"Commentary on Luke 14:12". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/luke-14.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

How to give feasts for a divine reward, Luke 14:12-14.

12. To him that bade him—We could almost suppose that our Lord meant to compliment the man who had furnished the feast for

him. A recompense—And then thou wilt be cheated of thy recompense from God. Our Lord here is giving no lesson against the interchange of hospitalities among friends. He does not deny that they have their healthful social influence among men. The repayments of the social debts of life, performed in the right spirit, have the blessing of God upon them. He would be evidently condemning himself in attending them, if he wore rebuking the inviters. But the bent of his lesson is this: As the feast of interchange has its return from thy fellow, so the feast of benevolence has its return from God.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘And he said to him also who had invited him, “When you make a dinner or a supper, do not call friends, nor your brothers, nor your kinsmen, nor rich neighbours, in case they also invite you in return, and a recompense be made to you.” ’

The passage begins with Jesus suggesting to His host, the ruler who was a Pharisee (Luke 14:1), that when next time he makes a supper or dinner he should not invite those who will return his invitation and thus recompense him for what he has done. For there is no goodness in that. It is simply a part of the social round. It may earn him a reputation as being a good host, but it will earn no plaudits from God.

Jesus is not, of course, discouraging family gatherings. He is rather using them to get over His point that the poor and needy should not be overlooked, and that what we do for them counts even more than what we do in this way for our families. We must remember that He had Himself attended many such gatherings (Martha and Mary had not invited the poor and the maimed, the lame and the blind - Luke 10:38-42). Jesus would have encouraged all kinds of relationships if they were leading to the betterment of men and women. But He desired especially that they would not forget the poor.


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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-14.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:12. To him also that had bidden him. These remarks imply that the host on this occasion had invited the chief persons of the place, and that he expected to receive some return from them. It was probably in a town in Perea, neither a large city nor a rural district, but just of that intermediate kind, where questions of position are deemed so important. The whole account is exceedingly apt and true to life.

Call not thy friends. ‘Call,’ here means more than ‘invite,’ it implies a loud calling, an ostentatious invitation, so that the whole town knows of the entertainment. The word will bear pondering wherever people sound a trumpet before their feasts. This is not a positive prohibition of entertaining one’s friends and neighbors. Such intercourse is taken for granted. What is forbidden is the thought that this is hospitality, or in itself praiseworthy.

A recompense be made thee. Feasts, etc., are largely mere matters of business, not of kindness. Taken in connection with Luke 14:14, this implies that everything of that kind, however allowable, has no high moral quality, results in no reward in the future world.—All expenses for entertainments, for which we expect a return, are expenses for self and not for others. If such entertainments prevent real charity (Luke 14:13) they are forbidden.


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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 14:12. φωνεῖν used for καλεῖν in Hellenistic Greek (Farrar, C. G. T.), denoting formal ceremonious invitation as on a great occasion (Hahn).— τοὺς φίλους, etc.: four classes likely to be asked on ordinary social grounds are named—personal intimates, brethren, relations (these two form one category), and rich neighbours. The epithet πλουσίους belongs to the last class alone. Friends and relatives are called because they are such. Mere neighbours are called only because they are rich, or, more generally, socially important.— μήποτε, lest, presenting return invitations ( ἀντικαλεῖν, here only in N.T.) as an object of dread, a fear unknown to the world. (Hic metus mundo ignotus, Bengel.)


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-14.html. 1897-1910.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

does not here forbid the invitation of friends and relatives, since that would be acting directly contrary to his own maxims and spirit, which breathe nothing but charity and union. He merely wishes to purify our motives in the disposal of our charity, by insinuating that there is more merit in giving to the indigent, from whom we can expect no remuneration. (Calmet) --- It is only an effect of avarice, to be liberal to those who will repay us, says St. Ambrose. It is our duty as acknowledged even by heathens (Cicero de Off. lib. i.) to assist those who stand most in need of it; but our practice says the same author, is to be most obsequious to those from whom we expect most, though they want our services the least. St. Ambrose, Ven. Bede, and St. John Chrysostom are of the same opinion.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/luke-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

also to him = to him also. The host.

dinner . . . supper. See note on Matthew 22:4.

call. Greek. phoneo. Compare 19. 15.

nor. Figure of speech Paradiastole (App-6), for emphasis.

neither . . . nor. Greek mede, compound of me. App-105.

bid . . . again. Greek. antikaleo. Occurs only here.

be made thee = take place, when such an one asks for gifts, not friends.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then said he also to him that bade him, When thou makest a dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, neither thy kinsmen, nor thy rich neighbours; lest they also bid thee again, and a recompence be made thee.

Then said he also to him that bade him, When thou makest a dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, neither thy kinsmen, nor thy rich neighbours; lest they also bid thee again, and a recompense be made thee - a fear the world is not afflicted with. Jesus certainly did not mean us to dispense with the duties of ordinary fellowship. But since there was no exercise of principle involved in it, except of reciprocity, and selfishness itself would suffice to prompt it, His object was to inculcate, over and above everything of this kind, such attentions to the helpless and provision for them as, from their inability to make any return, would manifest their own disinterestedness, and, like every other exercise of high religious principle, meet with a corresponding gracious recompense.


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(12) A dinner or a supper.—The two words were used respectively for the morning and the evening meal—the former, like the Continental déjeûner, being taken commonly a little before noon, the latter, about sunset.

Thy friends, nor thy brethren.—The words were clearly chosen as including the classes of guests who were then present. Our Lord saw in that Sabbath feast nothing but an ostentatious hospitality, calculating on a return in kind. It might not be wrong in itself, but it could take no place, as the Pharisee clearly thought it would do, in the list of good works by which he sought to win God’s favour. The very fact that it met with its reward on earth excluded it, almost ipso facto, from the reward of the resurrection of the just.


Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then said he also to him that bade him, When thou makest a dinner or a supper, call not thy friends, nor thy brethren, neither thy kinsmen, nor thy rich neighbours; lest they also bid thee again, and a recompence be made thee.
when
1:53; Proverbs 14:20; 22:16; James 2:1-6
and a
6:32-36; Zechariah 7:5-7; Matthew 5:46; 6:1-4,16-18

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:12". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.


Lectionary Calendar
Friday, August 17th, 2018
the Week of Proper 14 / Ordinary 19
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