Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Luke 14:18

But they all alike began to make excuses. The first one said to him, ‘I have bought a piece of land and I need to go out and look at it; please consider me excused.'
New American Standard

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Care;   Covetousness;   Excuses;   Feasts;   Gospel;   Jesus, the Christ;   Jesus Continued;   Kingdom of Heaven;   Opportunity;   Reproof;   Salvation;   Unbelief;   Worldliness;   Thompson Chain Reference - Absorption;   Bible Stories for Children;   Business;   Business Life;   Children;   Earnestness-Indifference;   Excuses;   Home;   Land;   Neglect;   Pleasant Sunday Afternoons;   Real Estate;   Religion;   Salvation;   Self-Justification-Self-Condemnation;   Stories for Children;   The Topic Concordance - Kingdom of God;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Care, Overmuch;   Entertainments;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Feasts;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Food;   Grace;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Christ, Christology;   Dead Sea Scrolls;   Gospel;   Grace;   Hospitality;   Kingdom of God;   Lord's Supper, the;   Wealth;   Work;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Call, Calling;   Family;   Luke, Gospel of;   Poor, Orphan, Widow;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kingdom of God;   Matthew, Gospel According to;   Parable;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Circumstantiality in the Parables;   Courtesy;   Discourse;   Dropsy;   Endurance;   Excuse;   Husbandman ;   Invitation;   Kindness (2);   Lazarus;   Luke, Gospel According to;   Marriage;   Pleasure;   Prophet;   Sacraments;   Unity (2);   Wealth (2);   Weights and Measures;   Worldliness (2);   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Election,;   Prophet, the;   Supper;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Jesus of Nazareth;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Consent;   Ground;   Jesus Christ (Part 2 of 2);   Maimed;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I have bought a piece of ground - Perhaps he had purchased it on condition that he found it as good as it had been represented to him.

I must needs go - I have necessity, or am obliged to go and see it; possibly pleading a contract or an agreement that he would go soon and examine it. However, we may learn from this that sinners sometimes plead that they are under a “necessity” to neglect the affairs of religion. The affairs of the world, they pretend, are so pressing that they cannot find time to attend to their souls. They have no time to pray, or read the Scriptures, or keep up the worship of God. In this way many lose their souls. God cannot regard such an excuse for neglecting religion with approbation. He commands us to seek “first” the kingdom of God and his righteousness, nor can he approve any excuse that people may make for not doing it.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/luke-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

And they all with one consent began to make excuse. The first said unto him, I have bought a field, and I must needs go out and see it; I pray thee have me excused. And another said, I have bought five yoke of oxen, and I go to prove them. I pray thee have me excused. And another said, I have married a wife and therefore I cannot come.

Boles insisted that "These are not flimsy and ridiculous excuses, as some have sought to make them, but the most important excuses that could be given."[28] But Summers called them "ridiculous and humorous."[29] As far as these excuses may be weighed as justifying the refusal of those bidden to attend the feast, they are worthless and therefore ridiculous; but from the standpoint of the carnal man, they did pertain to the things men of the world hold to be most important: real estate, business, and family relations.

There is evident a progressive unwillingness to attend in the excuses offered: (1) One pleads necessity; (2) the next pleads his will not to go; and (3) the third said flatly, "I cannot," but did not bother to ask any release from his obligation. In the case of this last, a marriage did exempt the bridegroom from the war (Deuteronomy 24:5; 20:7), but not from a feast it was his duty to attend. It has been often noted that there was really no compelling reason behind any of the excuses. Viewing land or proving oxen which had "already been purchased" cannot be looked upon as valid reasons for their refusal; and, in the case of the man with a bride, where was there ever a bride who would not have wished to attend a feast in the home of a rich man?

The three excuses have this in common, that "They all plead something that pertains to self, and all place the gratification of selfish desires above duty and obligation."[30]

In the aggregate, these three who made excuses stand for the Jews who rejected the invitation to receive the kingdom. There had come about, through ages, a deterioration of what the concept of the kingdom meant to the chosen people. Especially among the leaders, a malignant carnality had distorted their thoughts of what God's kingdom would be; and, for that reason, they insultingly rejected Christ.

[28] H. Leo Boles, op. cit., p. 288.

[29] Ray Summers, Commentary on Luke (Waco, Texas: Word Books, Publisher, 1974), p. 179.

[30] J. S. Lamar, op. cit., p. 195.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/luke-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And they all with one consent began to make excuse,.... Or, "they all together", as the Vulgate Latin version, באחת, "in one", or "at once": in Jeremiah 10:8 rendered "altogether"; and so the Ethiopic version, which adds, "with one voice": but their words and language were not the same: their excuses are differently expressed. Some render απο μιας, "from one hour": or the selfsame hour; immediately, directly, as soon as ever they were bidden, they began to frame excuses; they at once agreed, as by common consent, to excuse themselves from coming.

The first said unto him, I have bought a piece of ground, or a field, and I must needs go and see it: he ought to have seen it before he bought it; and however, it was a very improper time, at evening, at supper time, as this was, to go and see a piece of ground; and at least it might have been put off till next morning; so that it was a mere excuse indeed.

I pray thee have me excused: coming to the supper: these were the principal men among the Jews, the Pharisees and rulers among the people; who were rich and covetous, worldly men; seeking their own worldly advantage more than their spiritual and eternal welfare, or the interest of God and religion.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
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Gill, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/luke-14.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

4 And they all with b one [consent] began to make excuse. The first said unto him, I have bought a piece of ground, and I must needs go and see it: I pray thee have me excused.

(4) For the most part even those to whom God has revealed himself are so mad, that any help which they have received of God they willingly turn into obstructions and hindrances.

(b) On purpose, and a thing agreed upon before: for though they give different reasons why they cannot come, yet all of them agree in this, that they have their excuses so that they may not come to supper.

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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/luke-14.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

all began to make excuse — (Compare Matthew 22:5). Three excuses, given as specimens of the rest, answer to “the care of this world” (Luke 14:18), “the deceitfulness of riches” (Luke 14:19), and “the pleasures of this life” (Luke 14:20), which “choke the word” (Matthew 13:22 and Luke 8:14). Each differs from the other, and each has its own plausibility, but all come to the same result: “We have other things to attend to, more pressing just now.” Nobody is represented as saying, I will not come; nay, all the answers imply that but for certain things they would come, and when these are out of the way they will come. So it certainly is in the case intended, for the last words clearly imply that the refusers will one day become petitioners.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

John Lightfoot's Commentary on the Gospels

18. And they all with one consent began to make excuse. The first said unto him, I have bought a piece of ground, and I must needs to and see it: I pray thee have me excused.

[With one consent to make excuse.] A very ridiculous, as well as clownish and unmannerly excuse this, if it grew towards night; for it was supper-time. A very unseasonable time to go and see a piece of ground new bought, or to try a yoke of oxen. The substantive, therefore, that should answer to the adjective, I would not seek any otherwhere than as it is included in the word make excuse; so that the sense of it may be they began all for one cause to make excuse, i.e. for one and the same aversation they had to it.

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Lightfoot, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "John Lightfoot Commentary on the Gospels". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jlc/luke-14.html. 1675.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

With one consent (απο μιαςapo mias). Some feminine substantive like γνωμηςgnōmēs or πσυχηςpsuchēs has to be supplied. This precise idiom occurs nowhere else. It looked like a conspiracy for each one in his turn did the same thing.

To make excuse (παραιτεισταιparaiteisthai). This common Greek verb is used in various ways, to ask something from one (Mark 15:6), to deprecate or ask to avert (Hebrews 12:19), to refuse or decline (Acts 25:11), to shun or to avoid (2 Timothy 2:23), to beg pardon or to make excuses for not doing or to beg (Luke 14:18). All these ideas are variations of αιτεωaiteō to ask in the middle voice with παραpara in composition.

The first (ο πρωτοςho prōtos). In order of time. There are three of the “many” (“all”), whose excuses are given, each more flimsy than the other.

I must needs (εχω αναγκηνechō anagkēn). I have necessity. The land would still be there, a strange “necessity.”

Have me excused (εχε με παρηιτημενονeche me parēitēmenon). An unusual idiom somewhat like the English perfect with the auxiliary “have” and the modern Greek idiom with εχωechō but certainly not here a Greek periphrasis for παρηιτησοparēitēso This perfect passive participle is predicate and agrees with μεme See a like idiom in Mark 3:1; Luke 12:19 (Robertson, Grammar, pp. 902f.). The Latin had a similar idiom, habe me excusatum. Same language in Luke 14:19.

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The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
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Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/luke-14.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Make excuse ( παραιτεῖσθαι )

Also rendered in New Testament refuse, Hebrews 12:19, Hebrews 12:25, where both meanings occur. See also 2 Timothy 2:23, Rev. Our phrase, beg off, expresses the idea here.

I must needs ( ἔχω ἀνάγκην )

Lit., I have necessity: a strong expression.

Go ( ἐξελθεῖν )

Go out ( ἐξ ) from the city.

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Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/luke-14.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And they all with one consent began to make excuse. The first said unto him, I have bought a piece of ground, and I must needs go and see it: I pray thee have me excused.

They all began to make excuse — One of them pleads only his own will, I go: another, a pretended necessity, I must needs go: the third, impossibility, I cannot come: all of them want the holy hatred mentioned Luke 14:26. All of them perish by things in themselves lawful.

I must needs go — The most urgent worldly affairs frequently fall out just at the time when God makes the freest offers of salvation.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/luke-14.html. 1765.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

INNOCENT OCCUPATIONS

‘They all with one consent began to make excuse.’

Luke 14:18

To make excuse, to beg off. This was no sudden, unexpected summons, something making an unlooked-for demand upon time already blocked with legitimate engagements. It was the case of an invitation offered and accepted, where, therefore, the coming of the guests might be looked for as a matter of course. Yet they begged to be excused, the great supper had no special charms for them as compared with what they had otherwise in hand.

I. The matters for which they disregarded the summons were right and proper in themselves.—There was not a neglecting of plain duty for some evil indulgence, some definitely sinful pursuit. It was right and proper that men who had bought a field or five yoke of oxen should examine the quality of their purchase. If a man wished to marry a wife, there was no reason why he should not do so. That men should put their heart into their normal work is obviously right. ‘Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do,’ says the wise King, ‘do it with thy might.’ St. Paul bids the Romans not to be slothful in business, though he carefully qualifies his orders by adding the further command to be ‘fervent in spirit, serving the Lord.’ Obviously, too, the married state is at any rate permissible, not to say desirable, for men. Yet the giver of the supper was angry, and we feel that he was discourteously and unfairly treated.

II. Clearly there are occupations, which to name is to condemn.—If in work, be it manual or mental, or in amusement, for recreation of body or mind, we cannot ask the Saviour to look on and bless the work or the recreation, clearly neither the work nor the play is such as any Christian man or woman has any right to indulge in. Lawful recreation is a good thing, but think for a moment how much of what, by a ghastly misnomer, is now called pleasure would have to be swept away.

(a) For example, works of fiction, when the selection is wisely made, and where due regard is had to the time that can legitimately be given to recreation, have a very proper and wholesome function. Yet, to say nothing of excess of indulgence even in the best works of fiction, does not the press of the present day pour forth books, which presumably are read, which are a disgrace to our Christianity, not to say our civilisation?

(b) Or take a second instance: what of the craze for gambling that seems to eat like a cancer, where the interest of a game seems nought unless it has the excitement which comes from the risking of money, where, whoever wins, some one must lose? Clearly recreations such as these are outside the circle of possible blessing.

Now let us look at the other side.

(c) Honest hard work of the right kind should be an unmixed blessing, yet work may take aspects from which the Christian man shrinks back.

(d) Or, again, what more noble, intellectual pursuit than the study of the laws of God’s working in nature, if so be that the study of the laws brings us nearer to the Lawgiver? Yet there is knowledge which may not lawfully be come by.

III. To bring the matter to a practical issue for ourselves.—If we are to avoid putting ourselves in the position of the guests of the parable, to avoid the danger of making excuse, whether occasionally or all through life, then we must remember that there is a danger that even necessary and laudable work may obscure the sense of the higher duty. If God is in all our thoughts, in all our works, the danger does not assail, though it be ever nigh. The commonest occupation may be glorified if this thought be present; the noblest occupation may be vitiated if it be absent.

(a) Is the merchant in his counting-house, the tradesman in his shop, the student among his books, in some sort less the servant of God than when engaged in direct religious duties? Surely it would sometimes seem as if men thought so by the actions they appear to justify to themselves.

(b) Rightly viewed, a man’s riches, his influence, his talents, his learning, all is but a loan deposited with him by the Master to be used in that Master’s cause. Alas! how easy it is to forget this and half unconsciously to make excuse!

(c) Are we never in danger of allowing our public worship to become mechanical, of allowing our main thought on leaving church to be the beauty or faultiness of the singing, the eloquence or tediousness of the sermon?

We have to face more insidious dangers than denial of the faith, or defiant disregard of God’s laws. Many a one to whom defiance would be an appalling thought, does not find it an unnatural thing to make excuse. May He, may our Good Shepherd ever be so absolutely ruling in all our thoughts and actions that nought may obscure the perfect welcome we give to the Master’s invitation!

Rev. Dr. Sinker.

(SECOND OUTLINE)

EXCUSES

The necessity of serving Christ is acknowledged by most people, but they have formed their own standard of religion.

I. When a higher standard is urged upon them they make excuses for not accepting it.

(a) Consider, for instance, the attendance at the daily services of the Church. How many are there who could come to morning or evening prayer if they would! But now in this Christian land there are literally only ‘two or three gathered together’ whenever a church is opened for week-day prayer.

(b) Then, again, how many regular church-goers there are who always excuse themselves when they are invited to the Holy Communion. It is the chief Service of our Church. It is the Service which our Lord Himself instituted, and which no Christian in the early days of the Church ever thought of neglecting. But now it is completely ignored from year’s end to year’s end by the mass of those who have been baptized into Christ’s Church

(c) Then, again, take the case of the Offertory. How often may it be said, What a paltry number of copper coins and little bits of silver money has been given in God’s name by people who could perfectly well afford to give generously, if they only allowed their consciences to dictate the amount of their offerings! How often do they pray that they may be excused?

II. Now what are these excuses worth?—There can be but one answer to such a question as this. No real excuse has been found, or ever will be discovered, to justify professing Christians in adopting the world’s standard of religion. The excuses which are offered now by those who wish to enter heaven, on their own terms, are just the same pitiful pleas which were made by the invited guests spoken of in the parable.

(a) Some excuse themselves still on the plea of worldly occupations, and say that family cares leave them no time to think of personal holiness.

(b) Others excuse themselves on account of their love of pleasure, since they imagine that no one can enjoy life who tries to live as an earnest Christian.

(c) Then, again, the possession of this world’s goods is often a cause for these excuses. The rich man, in the parable, is represented as going to gratify his pride by walking about and gazing at the land which he had purchased, in preference to attending the supper.

(d) Even the love of relatives and friends may alienate the affections from God. Infatuated love for a godless husband, or for a worldly-minded wife, has often been taken advantage of by Satan to get a soul into his power.

If you wish to profit by the parable, examine yourselves and see what excuses you have been making for the neglect of any Christian duties which your consciences tell you ought to have been performed.

—Rev. W. S. Randall.

Illustrations

(1) ‘When the good missionary Bishop Otto was doing his best to spread the Gospel in Prussia, some centuries ago, he found that one of the most powerful influences against him was caused by some of the very people who had already professed Christianity. The inhabitants of Stettin, one of the most important towns in Pomerania, received the bishop with scorn. They refused to change their religion and give up idolatry; and to all the missionary said they only replied: “Are there not thieves and robbers among you Christians?” The inconsistent lives of their neighbours who were supposed to be Christians were an argument against which the good bishop had the greatest difficulty to contend. But this difficulty has been encountered in all parts of the world, and we should not be allowed to lose sight of the fact that the cause of the Gospel is still hindered, as much as it ever was, by the behaviour of many who call themselves Christians.’

(2) ‘An old Spanish proverb truly puts it—“The road of ‘by and by’ leads to the town of ‘Never.’”’

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Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/luke-14.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

18 And they all with one consent began to make excuse. The first said unto him, I have bought a piece of ground, and I must needs go and see it: I pray thee have me excused.

Ver. 18. I have bought, &c.] Licitis perimus omnes. It is ordained that all die. More die by food than by poison. Cavete, latet anguis in herba. Beware, a snake lies hidden in the food.What more lawful than a farm? what more honourable of all pleasures than marriage? But these men had not so much bought their farms, &c., as were sold to them: not so much married wives, as were married to them. Uxori nubere nolo meae, I refuse to be married to my wife. Martial.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/luke-14.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Luke 14:18

That God's call is often disobeyed is a matter of fact, of which our consciences cannot pretend to be ignorant. But the nature of the excuses given is well worthy of our consideration.

I. One of these excuses arises from a feeling that our common work is not a matter of religion; and that therefore it is not sinful to neglect it. Idleness and vice are considered as two distinct things; and it is very common to say, and to hear it said, of such a one that he is idle, but that he is perfectly free from vice. Idleness is not vicious, perhaps, but it is certainly sinful; and to strive against it is a religious duty, because it is highly offensive to God. This is so clearly shown in the Parable of the Ten Talents, in that of the Sower and the Seed, and even in the account of the Day of Judgment, given by our Lord in the twenty-fifth chapter of St. Matthew, that it cannot require a very long proof. In the description of the Day of Judgment, the sin for which the wicked are represented as turned into hell is only that they have done no good. It is not mentioned that they were vicious, in the common sense of the word; but they were sinful, inasmuch as they had not done what God commanded them to do.

II. Another excuse more nearly resembles the excuses made by the men in the parable: you do not attend to the call of God, because there is some other call which you like better. You complain, or rather you say to yourselves, that the work is very irksome to you, and you cannot see the use of it. It is likely enough that the work is irksome; for so corrupt is our nature that God's will is generally irksome to us, because He is good and we are evil. But is this such an excuse as God will allow for not doing what He has commanded us? Is it not here rather that we should learn to practise our Saviour's command, "Let a man deny himself, and take up his cross daily and follow Me"? What is denying ourselves, but doing what we do not like, because it is the will of our Master? What is to take up our cross daily, but to find and to bear daily some hindrance in ourselves or others, which besets and would close up our path of duty? Against idleness, no less than against other sins, the Christian has the only sure means of victory. The natural evil inclination, the weak and corrupt flesh, still finds duty painful; but the regenerate spirit, born again of the Spirit of God, and sharing in its Father's likeness, finds the will of its Father more pleasant than the flesh finds it painful; and so the will of God is done, and the man is redeemed from the bondage of sin and misery.

T. Arnold, Sermons, vol. ii., p. 93.


References: Luke 14:18.—Spurgeon, Sermons, vol. x., No. 578; E. Blencowe, Sermons to a Country Congregation, vol. ix., p. 198; R. D. B. Rawnsley, Village Sermons, 2nd series, p. 154. Luke 14:22.—J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 1874, p. 263; Homiletic Quarterly, vol. iii., p. 129.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/luke-14.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Luke 14:18. With one consent The phrase, Απο μιας is all that is in the original. It seems the most natural to supply the ellipsis by the word νομηςconsent, as our translators have done.

See commentary on Luke 14:16

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/luke-14.html. 1801-1803.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 14:18. ἤρξαντο, they began) Previously they had professed for their part to be in a state of expectation [waiting for the call to be given].— ἀπὸ μιᾶς) ‘Elliptical,’ says Camerarius, who adds, “ ἀπὸ μιᾶς, viz. γνώμης, with one consent or mind (with unanimity); or ἀπὸ μιᾶς παραιτήσεως (with one declining), i.e. they all alike began to decline the invitation. So almost similarly in Iliad βʼ, εἴγε ποτʼ ἔσγε μιάν βουλεύσομεν, namely, supplying βουλὴν, if ever we shall deliberate with unity of counsel among us: and so elsewhere, οὐχ ὁσιή, κταμένοισιν ἐτʼ ἀνδράσιν εὐχετάασθαι, namely, εὐχή, the vaunting is not pious wherewith one vaunts over the dead. And in Psalms 26, μιὰν ᾐτησάμην παρὰ τοῦ κυρίου, namely, αἴτησιν; and in Psalms 57, εὐθείας κρίνετε υἱοὶ τῶν ἀνθρώπων, namely, κρίσεις.” [— παραιτεῖσθαι, to make excuse) “To buy a piece of ground,” etc., are things not bad in themselves; but it is bad to be entangled and encumbered by such things, and to make as our pretext necessity in the case of earthly things combined with (alleged) impossibility (Luke 14:26, οὐ δύναμαι ἐλθεῖν, I cannot come) in the case of spiritual things.—V. g.— αὐτῷ, to Him) who had prepared the banquet.—V. g.]— ἄγρον, a field [piece of ground]) In this verse there is implied a farm, in the following verse, trafficking, merchandise. Comp. Matthew 22:5 [They went their ways, one to his farm, another to his merchandise]. The verb, ἠγόρασα, I have bought, repeated in both cases, Luke 14:18-19, implies eagerness to make gain, as is the usual feeling whilst the transaction is still recent. To a worldly man when he is made sensible of the Divine call, all vain things are new and sweet.—[ ἠγόρασα, I have bought) It is profitable to allege on the opposite side as a ground for denying the world, another and very different purchase of a field (the Gospel-field containing the pearl of great price), Matthew 13:44, another kind of plowing (the Gospel-plow), Luke 9:62, in fine, another espousal (viz. to Christ), 2 Corinthians 11:2.—V. g.]— ἔχω ἀνάγκην, I must needs, I feel it necessary) Often there meet together the most acceptable seasons of grace, and the most urgent calls of worldly business. This man makes as his pretext a feigned necessity: The second, a mere inclination after other things, Luke 14:19, πορευόμαι, I go; The third, Luke 14:20, a perverse allegation of impossibility, I cannot come. This last one declares expressly that he cannot; the two former declare that they will not, but use a courteous formula of apology. The holy hatred ( μισεῖ τὸν πατέρα αὐτοῦ) spoken of in Luke 14:26 [if they had felt it] could have healed them all of their excuses. However the variety in their modes of rejecting the invitation lay not so much in their state of mind [which was the same in all three] as in the objects on which their rejection of it rested, “the piece of land,” “the oxen,” “the wife.” Comp. Matt. l. c.— ἐρωτῶ, I beg, I pray, thee) A most unworthy and wretched prayer (request) whereby the kingdom of God is refused.

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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/luke-14.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

See Poole on "Luke 14:16

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Luke 14:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/luke-14.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

извиняться Во всех этих извинениях чувствуется неискренность. Никто не покупает имение, предварительно не посмотрев на него. И поскольку покупка уже была совершена, то не было никакой срочности. После пира земля все еще будет там. Точно также (ст. 19), никто не покупает волов, сперва не испытав их. Недавно женившийся человек (ст. 20) освобождался от путешествия по служебным делам или от службы в армии (Втор. 24:5), но не было никакой уважительной причины, чтобы новобрачные уклонялись от такого светского (уже принятого) приглашения.

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MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/luke-14.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

To make excuse; showing the unwillingness of men to accept the offers of salvation.

I must needs; literally, I have a necessity. This shows the manner in which necessity is sometimes used in the Bible to express a strong desire.

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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/luke-14.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

“And they all with one consent began to make excuse. The first said to him, ‘I have bought a field, and I find it necessary for me to go out and see it, I beg you, have me excused.’ ”

The excuses are to some extent patterned on the excuses offered to Israel’s fighting men before they went to war, (excuses which were probably not intended to be taken up as an examination of them demonstrates. See our commentary on Deuteronomy 20:5-7). There it was a house, a vineyard and a wife that gave the excuse. Here it is a piece of land (which could be a vineyard), a yoke of oxen and a wife. In Deuteronomy they were probably excuses offered in order to enable the men to refuse them, which would then nerve them for the fight and remind them of what they were fighting for. But there is no hint of warfare in this passage, apart possibly from the fight of faith. But they still excuse themselves.

We can take the excuses as either artificial or genuine. If the former they were typical of the excuses people make when faced up with the truth of the Gospel, if the latter they are evidence of ‘the cares of this world, the deceitfulness of riches and the desire for other things’ that make the word unfruitful (Mark 4:18-19). But either way they were a deep insult. Only the most urgent of catastrophes could excuse not responding to such a final invitation when it followed one already given and technically, if not actually, accepted.

One of those invited excused himself, making as his excuse the fact that the had bought a piece of land and needed to go out and examine it. But all would know that he could have done this at any time, and that the evening was not the best time for such a venture anyway. His need to see it suggests that his agent had bought it for him. He is deliberately depicted as wealthy. But the idea is either that he was just making an excuse, or that he was too taken up with his possessions to be willing to forsake them in order to go to the supper, that is, to enter into the Kingly Rule of God.

‘All with one consent.’ Apo mias probably signifies ‘unanimously’, although some have translated ‘all at once’, immediately’. But the point is clear. All took the same view.

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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/luke-14.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

18.They all—They seem to have been the gentry of the city, which we suppose to be Jerusalem. This they would seem to include the Pharisees, the present hearers of our Lord, and even the self-congratulating individual to whom the parable was addressed.

With one consent—Scarce a single individual of the hierarchy accepted the invitation of the Gospel. There have been a number of explanations of these three excuses. Some explain the piece of ground as referring to property possessed, the oxen as property getting, and the wife as sensual enjoyments. We might suggest that the land is dead materiality; that the oxen rise to animal life, and the wife to human and social life. It seems doubtful, however, whether our Lord meant any symbolical classification. The three simply mean that the attractions of this world overcome the attractions of that eating bread in the kingdom of God which this man was lauding.

Have me excused.There is a climax in the form of the excuse. The first feels himself under the necessity, needs, to refuse; the second will not affirm necessity, and would go, but begs to be excused. The third neither pleads necessity nor asks to be excused, but stays away of his will.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/luke-14.html. 1874-1909.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 14:18. And they all. The exceptions among the rulers and Pharisees were so few, that this feature of the parable might well be thus stated.

With one consent, or ‘accord.’ All in the same spirit, although the excuses are different as well as the manner in which they were made. All were prompted by worldliness, though in different forms.

To make excuse. They acknowledged the obligation to some extent.

I have bought a field, etc. This represents the man of business, occupied with his possessions, yet not uncourteous, but pleading necessity: I must needs go out and see it. Not that he had bought it without seeing it, but that it needed looking after, or it may refer to a chance for a bargain, which depended on his going out to see the land just then.

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Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/luke-14.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

Luke 14:18. (supply , , , or some such word implying with one mind, or at one time, or in the same manner, here only in Greek literature), with one Consent.— : not to refuse, but in courteous terms to excuse themselves.— , the first; of three, simply samples, by no means exhausting the list of possible excuses.— : a respectable excuse, by no means justifying absence, but excellently exemplifying preoccupation, the state of mind common to all. A man who has purchased a farm is for a while very much taken up with it and makes himself very busy about it; everything else for the moment secondary.— : no fewer than three Latinisms have been found in this sentence; this, the use of in the sense of rogo, and (Grotius). But parallels can be found in Greek authors for the first. Kypke cites an instance of the second from Josephus. The third, if not a Latinism (Meyer and J. Weiss say no, Schanz and Hahn yes), is at least exactly = excusatum me habeto.

 

 

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Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/luke-14.html. 1897-1910.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

with one consent = from (Greek. apo. App-104. iv) one [mind],

make excuse . beg off.

a piece of ground = a field.

must needs = have need to.

go = go out (i.e. from the city). Greek. exerchomai, as in verses: Luke 14:21, Luke 14:23.

and see = to see. App-133.

I pray. App-134.

have = consider me.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/luke-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And they all with one consent began to make excuse. The first said unto him, I have bought a piece of ground, and I must needs go and see it: I pray thee have me excused.

And they all with one consent began to make excuse. The first said unto him, I have bought a piece of ground, and I must needs go and see it: I pray thee have me excused.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/luke-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(18) They all with one consent . . .—The Greek phrase, as the italics show, is elliptical; but the English idiom expresses its meaning whether we take the omitted noun to be “voice,” or “consent” or “mind.”

To make excuse.—To beg off would, perhaps, be too colloquial, but it exactly expresses the force of the Greek verb.

I have bought a piece of ground.—The Greek noun implies a little more than the English—better, perhaps, a farm (see Notes on Mark 6:36); and the tense in each case is strictly one in which a man naturally speaks of the immediate past—“I bought but now.”

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/luke-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And they all with one consent began to make excuse. The first said unto him, I have bought a piece of ground, and I must needs go and see it: I pray thee have me excused.
all
20:4,5; Isaiah 28:12,13; 29:11,12; Jeremiah 5:4,5; 6:10,16,17; Matthew 22:5,6; John 1:11; 5:40; Acts 13:45,46; 18:5,6; 28:25-27
I have
8:14; 17:26-31; 18:24; Matthew 24:38,39; 1 Timothy 6:9,10; 2 Timothy 4:4,10; Hebrews 12:16; 1 John 2:15,16
Reciprocal: Genesis 25:34 - thus Esau;  Deuteronomy 20:7 - lest he die;  Proverbs 1:30 - GeneralMark 4:15 - these;  Mark 4:19 - the cares;  Luke 9:61 - but;  Acts 17:32 - We will

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Luke 14:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/luke-14.html.